Tag Archives: Putu Kusama

Keliki Kawan Miniature Painting Exhibition: Werdi Jan Kerti Artist’s Assoc.

I Putu Adi - "Sejarah Perdaban Cina in Bali"                              Sejarah Perdaban Cina di Bali – I Putu Adi

More 60 images of the reknown Balinese modern traditional style of the Keliki School of Miniature Painting went on display, 18 April at Ubud’s Museum Puri Lukisan. The Keliki Kawan Exhibition 2017, by the Werdi Jana Kerti Artist’s Association, continues until 3 June at Ubud’s centrally located, historical museum.

Last in line in the chronology of genres of modern traditional painting, coming after the mid 1960’s Young Artist’s Style, the Keliki paintings depict on paper the plethora of Balinese imagery in the tiniest of frameworks. The art of creating miniature images, however, has a long history, having been passed down over generations and dating back as far as the 9th century.

I Made Jongko - "Panen" 2016                                              Panen –  Made Jongko

Derived from the decorated manuscripts, processed on dried leaves and known as the lontars, the information is contained on pages measuring 30cm wide by 5cm high. Still in use today, the books reveal knowledge as diverse as holy scriptures, prominent rituals, family lineages, laws, medicine, arts, architecture, calendars, literature, and even the rules for cock-fighting. A sharp writing instrument is used to score the small text and drawings.

The Keliki School of Miniature Painting began in the early 1970’s in the Keliki Kawan village, 20 minutes north of Ubud. The village nowadays is home to more than 300 artists, in a tradition where the master pupil relationship, often father and son/s, plays an essential role. Two artists, I Ketut Sana (b.1952) and I Made Astawa (b.1953) are responsible for the development of this style that over time evolved to encompass a community of artists, and helping to supplement the incomes of poor farmers through the sale of works.

Gusti Putu Sudana "Pulau Bali" 2016                                   Pulau Bali – Gusti Putu Sudana

Both Sana and Astawa were students of the grandson of Bali’s most important modern artist and architect, Gusti Nyoman Lempad (c1865-1978), while also learning from masters of another respected genre, the Batuan School. Inspired by Lempad’s line techniques and the crowded Batuan ‘signature’ style, they reduced their compositions down in size, and the Keliki miniature style was born.

In 2011 the Werdi Jana Kerti Artists Association of the Keliki Kawan village was formed in an effort to maintain and preserve the genre. Since 2013 they have exhibited annually at Museum Puri Lukisan, the exhibition being a highlight on the Ubud art calendar. The collective currently has 75 members, of which 58 participate in the current show, aged from 14-70 years, including 11 women, while 23 of the artists are under 30 years.

Gusti Putu Lasyantika "Panen" 2016 12x12cm                                    Panen – Gusti Putu Lasyantika

Panen, 2016, by Gusti Putu Lasyantika is a fine example of the miniature style. His painting fuses two compositions into one. The outer image, set on a black background, is of colorful native birds peering in on the inner scenario, while contrasting with, and framing it. The inner focal landscape, constructed in receding layers to emphasize depth of field, shows farmers harvesting rice fields. In the distance Bali’s iconic volcanic landscape is visible with the sun’s soft golden rays illuminating the afternoon sky. What’s remarkable about Lasyantika’s painting, which involved hours of painstaking attention to detail, is that all of this imagery is captured within the reduced dimensions of only 12 x 12 centimeters!

During the past decade the onslaught of modernization that has become incompatible with traditional norms, has become a popular theme among traditional painters. Deforestation and relentless urban development are depicted in Illegal Logging, 2016 by Putu Kusuma. In the foreground heavy machinery and men with chain saws destroy the landscape. In the background the city’s high-rise skyline encroaches. The focal point is the sacred Balinese tree as the foundation of the natural eco system – the tree of life.

I Gusti Putu Sudarma "Bandara Harapan" 2017 38x27cm                            Bandara Harapan – Gusti Putu Sudarma

Gusti Putu Sudarma’s Bandara Harapan, 2016, 38 x 27 cm, acrylic on paper, is also aligned with the fore mentioned theme, yet his imagery is mostly unconventional. In a scene reminiscent of Dutchman Hieronymus Bosch (c.1450 -1516), in his style that was the forerunner to the 1920’s surrealism movement, the artist depicts a composition of two opposing worlds.

The foreground is filled with colorful circus characters, both real and imagined, with an array of unusual objects, some small, while others are monumental. Various other abstract structures and forms, along with figures appearing as observers, make up the relevant visual information. A few, seemingly insignificant, traditional parasols are the only recognizable Balinese icons.

I Putu Adi -Dewi Drupadi Dilecechi Oleh Kurawa" 2015                           Dewi Drupadi Dilecechi Oleh Kurawa – Putu Adi

Rendered faintly in the distance is the Bali of yesteryear, in a lush mountainous landscape dotted with Hindu temples. In top the right side a sits a small figure raised upon a pillar in meditation, while in the top left corner two brown figures appear, one holds a flag in an apparent gesture of surrender, the other in apparent raptures of grief.

This is a fascinating and clever composition worthy of focused attention. Do Sudarma’s metaphoric symbols represent his idea of a dystopian Bali?

I Putu Kusuma - "Illegal Logging" 2016                              Illegal Logging – Putu Kusuma

 

Keliki Kawan Exhibition 2017

Open daily 9am – 5pm

Museum Puri Lukisan, Ubud

Jalan Raya, Ubud, Bali

www.museumpurilukisan.com

Words & Images: Richard Horstman

 

 

 

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Larasati Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art Auction: Bali 21 August

made-sutama-the-dream-image-richard-horstman                                “The Dream” 2015 –  Made Sutama (b. 1977 Keliki)

Eighty works of fine art went under the hammer before an enthusiastic floor of bidders at Ubud’s ARMA museum 21 August Larasati Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art auction. The attractive array of paintings in Balinese traditional styles and Indonesian modern and contemporary genres offered good buying opportunities in prices ranges suitable for new collectors and connoisseurs alike.

From the beginning of 2016 real time bidding has been available through the Larasati website, opening the auction to a global audience. The auction featured spirited bidding both on the floor and via telephone, and purchases online. Most of the works sold within their estimate prices while for new collectors purchases were available starting from Rp. 3.5 million.

20160820_181740                                      “Aksi Badut and Topeng” – Ketut Sadia (b. 1966 Batuan)

Ida Bagus Putu Sena (b. 1966 Tebesaya, Ubud) is a remarkable talent, his characteristic style while being extraordinarily detailed, features dark and moody compositions. Lot #523 “Shadow Puppet Show” 2009, estimated price between Rp. 75 – 90 million, was hammered down for Rp. 95 million. (all works incur a 22% buyers premium on top of the auctioneers selling price). Lot #530 “Petani’ 2003 by Ketut Kasta (b. Peliatan 1945), a beautiful figurative work in muted pinkish hues, serene in its simplicity was estimated between Rp. 25 – 30 million and sold for Rp. 40 million.

Iconic Dutch painter Arie Smit (1916-2016) died in March at home in Ubud, only days short of reaching the golden age of one hundred years old. Responsible for the development of the “Young Artists” style of Balinese traditional art in the early 1960’s, since his passing prices for his some works at Hong Kong auctions have noticeably increased.

putu-deaw-bedil-suasana-pasar-image-richard-horstman                                    “Suasana Pasar” –  Dewa Putu Bedil (1921-1999)

Of the three lots available, Lot #546 “A Girl Leaving the Temple” estimated between Rp. 65 – 75 million, sold for Rp 65 million, Lot #547 “The Forest“ estimated between Rp. 95 -120 million sold for Rp. 85 million, while #548 “Boy” 1988 estimated price between Rp. 270 – 320 million, however failed to sell.

Works of painstaking miniature detail characterize the Keliki School of Balinese traditional art. Three excellent paintings were available by up and coming artists who represent the future of this genre. Lot #519 “The Dream” 2015 by Made Sutama (b. 1977 Keliki) is a colorful fantastic composition, estimated price between Rp. 10 – 12 million sold for Rp. 9.5 million. Lot # 520 “The Death of Kumbakarna” 2014 by Putu Kusama (b.1986 Keliki) with an estimated of Rp. 12 – 15 million sold for Rp. 17 million via the internet, and Lot # 550 “Festivity at Temple” by Made Ocen (b. 1974 Keliki) undervalued with an estimate price between Rp. 10 – 12 million and sold for Rp. 9 million. Each of these works offered excellent buying for the seasoned collectors along with those with mid range budgets for good long-term investments.

a-a-gede-anom-sukawati-mengarak-jero-gede-image-by-richard-horstman            “Mengarak Jero Gede” 2003  –  A.A. Gede Anom Sukawati (b. Ubud 1966)

A rare old work by the renowned Batuan painter Wayan Bendi Lot # 555 “Tourists in the 1950’s” estimated price between Rp.15 – 20 million sold for Rp. 14 million. Lot # 505 “Aksi Badut and Topeng” by another outstanding Batuan painter Ketut Sadia with an estimated price between Rp. 16 -20 million sold for Rp. 16 million offering good value buying for this innovative composition. Considered an “outsider artist” Putu Dewa Mokoh (Pengosekan 1936-2010) is a painter of unusual, often quirky and humorous compositions. Lot # 502 “Berenang di Laut” estimated price between Rp. 18 – 22 million sold for Rp.16 million, while Lot #558 “Hunting in the Forest” estimated price between Rp. 28 – 35 was hammered down for Rp. 30 million.

ketut-kasta-petani-2003-image-richard-horstman                                       “Petani’ 2003 –  Ketut Kasta (b. Peliatan 1945)

The Pitamaha artist’s collective played a decisive role in the development of Balinese modern traditional art from 1936-1945 and two works by deceased masters of the collective were available. Lot# 567 by Gusti Ketut Kobot (1917-1999) “Garuda Whisnu” was undervalued for its size of 105 x 75 cm, estimated price between Rp. 90 – 110 million and selling for Rp.85 million. While Lot #568 by Ida Bagus Made Togog (Batuan 1913 – 1989) “Story of Dukuh Siladri” a shimmering work of exceptional quality and condition, estimated price between Rp. 270 – 350 million, sold for Rp. 350 million.

Lot # 569 “Suasana Pasar” Dewa Putu Bedil (1921-1999) is a extraordinary work of balance and beauty, being undervalued at the estimate between Rp. 75 – 90 million, it sold for Rp. 95 million. Of the contemporary works available sought names such as Jumaldi Afli, Ugo Untoro and Dede Eri Supria attracted only marginal attention, yet offered good buying opportunities for new collectors wishing to purchase works by big name artists.

arie-smit-a-girl-leaving-the-temple-photo-by-richard-horstman                               “A Girl Leaving the Temple” – Arie Smit (1916-2016)

The most prized work of the afternoon was the final item, was Lot # 580 “Mengarak Jero Gede” 2003 by A.A. Gede Anom Sukawati (b. Ubud 1966) arguably Bali’s finest living traditional painter. His 75 x 135 cm acrylic on canvas composition, a stunning dance scene of detail and vibrancy, estimated price between Rp. 160 – 190 million, realized determined bidding selling for a world record price for the artist at Rp. 345 million, inclusive of the 22% buyer’s premium.

Words & Images: Richard Horstman

20160820_182538             “Story of Dukuh Siladri” – Ida Bagus Made Togog (Batuan 1913 – 1989)

20160820_181951                   “Berenang di Laut” – Dewa Putu Mokoh ((Pengosekan 1936-2010)