Tag Archives: Elizabeth Gower

“Dipping in the Kool Aid” highlights collaborations between contemporary artists & inmates of Bali prisons

Rodney Glick "Pixel Buddha" image courtesy of apexart Gallery New York                                           Pixel Buddha – Rodney Glick

 

What is the value of human life?

How does our society appraise personal endeavour, imagination and creativity when the priority of doctors and medical staff in hospitals is the preservation of life? Governments and penal systems assess prisoners as having little to contribute to community, some electing to terminate the lives of ‘serious offenders’ through capital punishment. Why is it acceptable for governments to execute people, while murder is illegal?

The exhibition “Dipping in the Kool Aid” relates to aspects of prisons and the incarceration system, and opened at Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud 4 March. It features the artworks of prisoners, artworks produced from workshops given by contemporary artists in Bali prisons, and independently produced works by some of the invited established and emerging Indonesian and Australian artists.

malaikat copy                                       King Kong’s Land – Malaikat

The works selected from a range of workshops, predominantly in the Klungkung Jail, East Bali, and the Bangli Jail, include installations, paintings, drawings and photographs, along with a painting by a member of the controversial Bali Nine inmates, Renae Lawrence.

“A function of prisons practically everywhere in the world ensures inmates are social outsiders, largely invisible to most citizens,” said Australian artist Mary Lou Pavlovic who organized and curated the exhibition. “Our central concern is to bring aspects of prison life to public view.”

The idea of the exhibition emerged from an art program Pavlovic helped establish with inmates at the Bangli Jail, Central Bali soon after the second round of prisoner executions were ordered by the President of the Republic of Indonesia Joko Widodo in 2015. “Our aim is to cherish and preserve life, the driving motivator for this entire project.”

Mary Lou Pavlovic and prison inmates Mary Lou Pavlovic with input from April, Exyl, Hendra, and Kadek,collaborative installation "Suspended Sentiments" Image courtesy of "Dipping in theSuspended Sentiments – Mary Lou Pavlovic and women inmates from the Klungkung and Bangli jails.

In April 2017 Pavlovic’s proposal written in response to the open call Apex Franchise Exhibition, sponsored by the apexart Gallery New York, offering funded exhibition opportunities, won. More than two hundred international art expert jurors had voted for her proposal to curate an exhibition in Bali about artists and prisoners collaborations arising from prison workshops. A non-profit arts organization in Lower Manhattan, apexart is funded in part by the Andy Warhol Foundation, and offers opportunities to independent curators and emerging and established artists, and challenges ideas about art, its practice, and its curation.

Highlights of “Dipping in the Kool Aid”, in which the cell formation is a theme of the exhibition’s presentation to emphasize the living space – life behind bars within a prison cell, include, the tiny, delicate folded paper birds “Terapi Origami/Orizuru” by Ridwan Fatkhurodin a.k.a. Kriyip on display, yet also given as symbolic gifts to attendees during the opening ceremony, Kenyut Djunaidi’s collaborative etched mirror self-portraits “Kamu Adalah Aku, (You are Me)” and Australian Rodney Glick’s humorously militarized carved wooden icon “Pixel Buddha”. Elizabeth Gower’s “365 Rotations” adds an ethereal element to the show. Multiple circular collages Gower and inmates forged from discarded packaging and advertising material form a constellation of wonderful geometric patterns.

"Angki Purbandono "Out Of the Box" Image courtesy of apexart                                Out of the Box – Angki Purbandono

Popular Indonesian artist Angki Purbandono presents an installation of photographs “Out of the Box” revealing his experience of ‘doing time’. Incarcerated for one year in Yogyakarta during 2013 for smoking marijuana, refusing to accept his imprisonment, Angki declared instead that he was undertaking an artist’s residency, and taught a guard how to take photographs. He also established the Prison Art Programs, a group of inmates and ex-inmates who exhibit art inside and outside the jail; some members are included here.

Three meters by three and a half meters wide, luminescent and sparkling with life “Suspended Sentiments”, features over 1700 individual cells with flowers, leaves, nuts, berries, butterflies, bugs and Christmas decorations embedded within epoxy resin. Pavlovic’s wall installation, the outcome of workshops for women in Klungkung and Bangli Jails is beguiling in beauty and simplicity, yet rich in emotion.

31052365_10155177701881916_4372840048123445248_n                                   Forgiveness #2 – Mangu Putra

“Physical power is defeated by wisdom,” said renowned Balinese painter Agung Mangu Putra of his composition, “Forgiveness 2”. Inspired by an iconic image, originally popularized by Indonesia’s founding father, President Sukarno, who was photographed bowing to his mother, the state symbolically begs the pardon of not only a mother, but of a citizen, instead of the usual power dynamic in which citizens bow before the state. Mangu’s Putra’s painting reveals a state official – a soldier – bowing and begging forgiveness of his mother, who has taken away his gun.

“American jail slang for entering uninvited into a conversation, the phrase “Dipping in the Kool Aid” pays tribute to the discrete Javanese tradition of Pasemon,” Pavlovic said. Reflecting on Indonesia’s revolutionary era of political art that began under the authoritarian President Suharto’s New Order regime (1966-1998), artists and journalists used an indirect form of satire to criticize the government. Pasemon is elegant because it touches the conscience,” she continued. “Correcting without embarrassing authority.”

30706637_10155177599011916_7359454426228064256_n                Terapi Origami/Orizuru  –  Ridwan Fatkhurodin a.k.a. Kriyip

“Values expressed in this exhibition contrast with aspects of the government’s treatment of prisoners recently in Indonesia. Pasemon has created a space for us in which our political positions are clarified without scratching the wound.”

30741219_10155177702336916_1128266463887491072_n              365 Rotations  –  Elizabeth Gower with inmates from Bangli Jail

30703717_10155176985641916_986154805040775168_o               View of “Dipping in the Kool Aid” at the Tony Raka Art Gallery

 

30708338_10155177599166916_6226232579398303744_n        After Hit n Run  –  Herman Yosef Dhyas Aries Utomo (a.k.a. Komeng)

 

Dipping in the Kool Aid”

Open to the public daily 10am – 5pm,

4 – 31 March 2018

Tony Raka Art Gallery,

JI.Raya Mas No. 86 Mas, Ubud, Bali.

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: apexart Gallery New York, Mary Lou Pavlovic & Bima Basudewa

Upcoming exhibition highlights the collaborations between contemporary artists and inmates of Bali prison

Inmates involved in art workshops at Klungkung jail. - Image Mary Lou Pavlovic              Inmates participating in art making workshop at Klungkung jail.

 

In early April this year Australian contemporary artist, Mary Lou Pavlovic, was advised by the apexart gallery New York that the proposal she’d written in response to their open call Apex Franchise Exhibition, offering four funded exhibition opportunities, had been successful. Pavlovic ranked third out of almost four hundred proposals from sixty-one countries. Over two hundred international art expert jurors had voted for her proposal to curate an exhibition in Bali about artists and prisoners collaborations arising from prison workshops.

Apexart is a non-profit arts organization in Lower Manhattan, NYC, funded in part by the Andy Warhol Foundation, that offers opportunities to independent curators and emerging and established artists, and challenges ideas about art, its practice, and its curation.

“I received an email advising me to contact the apexart Director, Steven Rand, who said he had good news,” Pavlovic said.   “So I thought I’d better call Apex and tell them of a hoax someone was running about them. Then, when I called, to my surprise, they confirmed that I had been selected, and that it wasn’t a hoax at all!”

From 2012-16, when in Bali, Pavlovic had been a regular visitor to inmates inside Balinese jails where she had witnessed the humanitarian benefits of art programs. “Prisoner’s lives are placed on hold and their space confined to the parameters of a prison. I realized, although prisoners couldn’t physically move very far, they could travel great distances with their imaginations by participating in arts activities,” said the artist who lives and works between Bali, and Mittagong, Australia, and completed a PhD at Monash University, Melbourne.

Inmates artworks - flowers and berries set in resin.Image Mary Lou Pavlovicjpg

“Inmates could also learn valuable skills and undertake enjoyable activities to relieve the daily monotony of prison life.”

Pavlovic was also aware that practically universally a function of modern prisons is to hide prisoners away from the rest of society. An exhibition involving prisoners and artists, she thought, would help to break down this barrier. It would allow the public an opportunity to reflect on their own perceptions of prisoners and prisons, along with the prisoners the opportunity to be seen in the role of artistic producers, rather than solely as criminals, and of little value to society.

The upcoming exhibition, organized and curated by Pavlovic, Dipping in the Kool Aid, (American jail slang for entering uninvited into a conversation) will be held at the Tony Raka Art Gallery, in Ubud, Bali, in 4 – 31 March 2018. The show will feature the artworks of prisoners, artworks produced from workshops given by contemporary artists in the Bali prisons, and independently produced studio works by some of the invited artists relating to aspects of prison and the incarceration system.

Pavlovic is interested in taking the exhibition beyond a community type art show in which members of a social group are asked to express themselves through art, and the therapeutic benefits of that process becomes the exhibition theme. “Exhibitions displaying prisoners artworks are common, but I think that if our project’s aim was only to display prisoner’s artworks, regardless of their artistic capabilities, then professional artists may not need to be involved at all,” she said.

Inmates at Klungkung jail art making. Image courtesy M.L. Pavlovic                                    Inmates at Klungkung jail art making

“There are so many highly capable creative people in jails, and so I thought that a more interesting and challenging way to address the exhibition, than a straightforward community art show, would be through a type of artistic laboratory in which the artists and prisoners skills are equally valued.”

With these ideas in mind, Pavlovic invited foreign international artists and Indonesian artists to give a range of workshops predominantly in the Klungkung Prison, East Bali. The workshops began in August, continuing on until March 2018 prior to the exhibition. East Javanese artist Djunaidi Kenyut conducts workshops inviting inmates to etch their own portraits onto postcard size mirrors. The prisoners become active agents in shaping his idea, and the overall work. The outcomes are ghostly etchings with viewers reflected in them.

“In the Klungkung prison there are about 100 inmates of which there is one person who is very enthusiastic to participate in the workshops, and there are others who like to join in. But I am very happy to witness their passion to know and learn to try new activities such as drawing,” Kenyut said.

Pavlovic provides lectures for women inmates involving embedding living things, like flowers leaves and berries in resin, to preserve life. At the prisoner’s request the group have incorporated butterflies, yet as the program continues the prisoners will incorporate items into their works that are important to them, such as family photos.

Other workshops conducted include East Javanese artist Imam Sucahyo who is posting drawings to inmates requesting their input, and Australian contemporary sculptor Rodney Glick, who has invited prisoners to his cafe, Seniman, at the Tony Raka Art Gallery, for work experience and to learn about art.

IMG_20170922_112054

Glick said, the Seniman coffee ethos is to create happiness. “What better way for people who crave freedom than to work a little and enjoy a coffee on the outside!” Other artists included in the upcoming exhibition are internationally renowned Indonesian artists Agung Mangu Putra and Angki Purbandono, along with the Prison Art Program founding members, and Elizabeth Gower, Alannah Russack and Pavlovic.

 

Dipping in the Kool Aid

Upcoming 3 – 21 March 2018

Tony Raka Art Gallery, Mas, Ubud

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Mary Lou Pavlovic