Tag Archives: Agung Mangu Putra

Previewing Larasati Jakarta Auction: Pictures of Indonesia 12 May 2019

Lot 627 "Boats at Kusamba" - Affandi Image Courtesy of Larasati                                         Boats at Kusamba – Affandi

 

Sixty-two items of fine art go under the hammer from 2:30 pm Sunday 12 May in the upcoming Pictures of Indonesia auction conducted by Larasati auctioneers at the CSIS Center, Tanah Abang, Central Jakarta.

The sale offers good buying opportunities for beginner and mid level collectors, as well as the seasoned connoisseurs, with lots available in a vast array of media including works in ink on paper, an etching, a charcoal sketch on paper, pastels on paper, watercolours on paper, oil pastel on canvas, oil and acrylic paint paintings on canvas, and sculptures. Genres of art to be auctioned comprise of Indonesian and Balinese modern paintings, contemporary paintings and sculptures, and Balinese modern traditional paintings, including works from the renowned Batuan School of painting – some are pre-war works.

Lot 662 "Mengintip" - I GAK Murniashi Image Courtesy of Larasati                                      Mengintip – I Gak Murniashi

 

Some of the well-known artists whose work appear in the sale are the Indonesian modern master Affandi (1907-1990), Ida Bagus Made Togog (1913-1989) from the Balinese village of Batuan, the famed Dutch colourist of Bali Arie Smit (1919-2016), talented Dutchman Willem Gerard Hofker (1902-1981), Balinese modern master Nyoman Gunarsa (1944-2017), Nashar (1928-1994), the overlooked painter of abstract and abstraction compositions, and the Balinese painter of the unconventional Dewa Putu Mokoh (1935-2010).

For those new to collecting fine art committed research, along with getting advice is essential, while internet databases are a good source of information, especially on prices of recently auctioned works. Auctions are transparent, providing benchmark prices that serve as a guide to how much collectors should be paying. Themed sections of work define the sale, beginning with Indo European featuring lots by noted Dutch artists, and an Indonesian artist, who painted pre-1960’s in the archipelago. While four compositions depict Indonesian coastal, village and city living, Lot 61 Geiderse Kade Amsterdam by Willem Gerard Hofker is a small etching of a canal scenario in Amsterdam that has an estimated price of between Rp. 4 – 6 million.

Lot 649 "A God and many animals in a Forest" - I Griem Image Courtesy of Larasati                              A God and many animals in a Forest – I Griem

 

For new buyers wishing to build their collection, the following works, if purchased within their estimated prices, offer very good buying. Lot 607 Balinese Woman, 1995, is an oil canvas painting by the overlooked American artist and long-term Bali expatriate Symon that has an estimated price of between Rp. 5 – 7 million. Lot 650 Village Life in Bali, is a colourful acrylic on paper scenario of village activity by noted Batuan painter Ida Bagus Putu Padma that has wan estimated value of between Rp. 6 – 8 million.

Two works are from the Pre War Balinese Art & Batuan Style section in the original Batuan ‘Black & White’ style achieved with ink on paper and reflecting some of the philosophies of the critically acclaimed genre. It must be noted that the years 1930 – 1945 are considered the golden years of Balinese painting. Lot 647 A Fight in a Village by Dewa Made Koendel, is a sketch in grey and black ink on paper, 34 x 31cm with an estimated price of Rp. 13 – 18 million, and Lot 649 A God and many animals in a Forest, circa 1936, by I Griem comes with good provenance and has an estimated value of between Rp. 13 – 18 million.

Lot 620 "Pemantasan Barong" - Wayan Meja Image Courtesy of Larasati                                Pementasan Barong – Nyoman Meja

 

The following lots offer good buying as potential investments if prepared to buy and hold the works for at least 10 – 15 years. Lot 630 Setan Mbesan, 2000-2001 by an icon of Indonesian art Nasirun, is a dramatic and colourful 92 x 147cm work with an estimated price of between Rp. 30 – 40 million. Lot 637 Dilarang Melintas #1, 2010 is an oil paint and pastel depiction of a child from the economically marginalised Balinese village of Songan by Bali’s most important painter Gusti Agung Mangu Putra. The work, which comes with an estimated price of between Rp 70 – 100 million, was exhibited in his landmark 2010 exhibition “Teater Rakyat” (People Theatre), at Galeri Nasional Indonesia, Jakarta.

Lot 656 Baruna Hotel Garden and New Queen Bali Restaurant, 2009 is by Dutch painter Paul Husner and comes with an estimated value of between Rp 70 – 90 million, Lot 662 Mengintip, 2002 with an estimated price of between Rp. 20 – 30 million is by Indonesia’s most significant female artist I Gusti Kadek Murniashi (1966-2006), from Bali, whose work was highly unconventional, erotic and violent, while emphasizing an array of women’s issues.

Lot 637 "Dilarang Melintas #1" - Agung Mangu Putra Image Courtesy of Larasati                              Dilarang Melintas #1 – Agung Mangu Putra

 

Highlights of the sale, and of special interest to the connoisseurs are these following three paintings. A beautiful and incredibly detailed composition of the drama and activity of a Balinese Barong dance, Lot 620 Pementasan Barong, 1999 by Nyoman Meja has an estimated price of between Rp. 300 – 350 million. Surprise and delight fill the faces of the children in the foreground, while the background reveals a vibrant wind swept scenario. Pulsating with energy in Affandi’s signature expressionistic style, Lot 627 Boats at Kusamba, 1980, is a 98 x 128cm oil on canvas composition of fishing boats on the beach in East Bali that has an estimated price of between Rp. 1,000 – 1,300 million. This is a rare work revealing the rigor of Affandi’s power late in his career.

Having previously studied modern art in New York Ahmad Sadali (1924-1987) became a leading avant-garde artist in the Indonesian post-war art and developed a distinctive style of his art in abstract patterns that are blended with the themes of spirituality and mysticism of Islam. Lot 644 Bidang dengan Bongkah Emas, 1986 has an estimated price of between Rp. 650 – 850 million, and was purchased by the current owner directly from Sadali.

Lot 644 "Bidang dengan Bongkah Emas" - Ahmad Sadali Image Coutesy of Larasati                            Bidang dengan Bongkah Emas – Ahmad Sadali

 

Lots 638 – 642 are oil on canvas works by the Javanese painter, classical dancer and contemporary dance choreographer from Yogyakarta, Bagong Kussudiardjo (1928-2004). Lot 639 Semar, 1995 by Kussudiardjo has an estimated price of between Rp. 35 – 45 million. Other interesting Balinese paintings in the sale are Lot 615 Aktifitas di Sawah, by Ketut Gelgel, Lot 614 Di Ladang , by Ketut Kebut, Lot 619 Pementasan Calonarang, by Wayan Djudjul (1942-2008) estimated price between Rp 35 – 45 million. Other popular Indonesian artists included in the sale are Kijono, Rusli, Widyat, Jehan and Yudi Sulistyo.

Potential buyers bidding over the phone, absentee bidders or real-time Internet bidders who are unable to attend the previews days or auction are advised to contact Larasati and enquire about the colour reproduction accuracy of the images contained within the online catalogue to ensure that what they wish to purchase can be realistically appraised. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue description does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections, therefore condition reports of the works, outlining the paintings current state and whether it has repairs or over painting, are available upon request.

Lot 647 "A Fight in a Village" Dewa Made Koendel Image Courtesy of Larasati                       A fight in a village – Dewa Made Koendel

 

Provenance, the historical data of the works previous owner/s is also important and is provided. An information guide including before the auction, during the auction and after the auction details, including conditions of business, the bidding process, payment, storage and insurance, and shipping of the work is also available. A buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer of each lot at rate of 22% of the hammer price of the lot.

Open to the public at CSIS Jakarta in Tanah Abang, the auction starts at 2:30 pm Sunday 12 May, while viewing begins from 10:30 am Saturday 11 May. The online catalogue, complete with a guide for prospective buyers is available at: www.larasati.com

Lot 619 "Pementasan Calonarang" - Wayan Djudjul Image Courtesy of Larasati                             Pementasan Barong –  Wayan Djudjul

 

Viewing:
Saturday, 11 May 2019, 10.30 am – 7.30 pm
Sunday,  12 May 2019, 10.30 am – 2 pm

Auction:
Sunday, 12 May 2019, starting at 2.30 pm

Venue:
CSIS Jakarta
Gedung Pakarti Center
Jl. Tanah Abang 3 No.23
Tanah Abang, Jakarta Pusat, Indonesia

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Courtesy of Larasati

 

 

Previewing Larasati’s Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art Auction, Bali, August 2018

dewa putu mokoh "iringan pengantin" image courtesy of larasati                     “Iringan Pengantin” – Dewa Putu Mokoh 

 

Each year Larasati Auctioneer’s, Indonesia’s oldest fine art auction house, present two auctions in Ubud highlighting Balinese traditional art. Upcoming Sunday 26 August is seventy-four items for sale in the Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art Auction. Open to the public, viewing begins 11am Friday 24 August at the Larasati Art Space at Tebesaya Gallery, Ubud, Bali.

The sale is led by a collection of Mr & Mrs Charles Powell, USA, and three beautiful traditional paintings by Wayan Radjin from the 1970’s. The sale presents works by old masters of traditional genres, some unique and rare paintings, works with investment potential, and an array of compositions that allow good entry opportunities into the market for new collectors.

wayan radjin "ramayana membebaskan dewi sita" image courtesy of larasati               “Ramayana Membebaskan Dewi Sita”- Wayan Radjin

 

Catering for a range of tastes works on offer include ink, and watercolour on paper, Indonesian modern art, Balinese modern and contemporary paintings and works in traditional styles, along with a wood carving. Distinguished Balinese artists featured are Ida Bagus Made Poleng, Ida Bagus Made Widja, Gusti Ketut Kobot and Nyoman Gunarsa. For new buyers wishing to enter the market, estimated prices in this sale begin at IDR 500,000 (USD $35). Auctions offer buying opportunities at prices much cheaper than purchasing works directly from the artist studio, or galleries.

These works by respected old masters will be of interest to the connoisseurs of Balinese art. Tjokorda Oka Gambir (1902-1975) is one of the founders of the Ubud School of Painting, lot# 549 Mythological Scene in Kamasan Style is a large 248 x 132cm work in natural colour on cloth with an estimated price of between IDR 65 – 80 million, while lot #550 Garuda & Wisnu is by one of the esteemed masters of the influential Pitamaha Artists Association from Ubud (1936-1945), Gusti Ketut Kobot (1917-1999) with an estimated price of between IDR 95 – 110 million.

dewa ketut rungun "burung burung bangau" image courtesy of larasati                   “Burung – Burung Bangau” – Dewa Ketut Rungun

 

Lot #574 Taris Bali is a superbly balanced composition of traditionally attired Balinese warrior emerging from the forest performing the unique warrior dance by Ida Bagus Made Poleng (1915 – 1999) who is regarded as one of the finest Balinese painters of the past century. This work bears the stamped identification that guarantees authenticity from the Ida Bagus Made Foundation, and has an estimated price of between IDR 165 – 190 million.

The following are rare pieces lot #544, Sarasvati is an early work by the respected Batuan painter Wayan Taweng (1922 – 2004) who trained under Nyoman Ngendon (1906 – 1946) with an estimated price of between IDR 10 – 15,000,000 million. Wayan Radjin (b.1945) is the son of the celebrated Batuan artist I Djata, considered the founding father of the Batuan School. Lot #527 Ramayana Membebaskan Dewi Sita by Radjin is a beautiful acrylic on canvas composition with an estimated price of between IDR 28 – 38 million. Most of Radjin’s works are on paper, and rarely does such a quality work come onto the market.

gusti ketut kobot "garuda wisnu" image courtesy of larasati                          “Garuda Wisnu” – Gusti Ketut Kobot

 

Lot # 572 Iringan Pengatin is a unique work because it is a crowded composition by the renowned painter of the unconventional, Dewa Putu Mokoh (1913 – 2010), and has an estimated price of between IDR 7 – 10 million, while lot #521 Ibu dan Anak, featuring a composition of a mother and child is too an unusual work by Dewa Ketut Rungun (1922-1986), who is noted for his bird compositions. It has an estimated price of between IDR 15 – 20 million.

Opportunities for good investments are lot #513 a. Di Malam Ini and b. Aku dan Dia Bermain, two paintings by Indonesia’s most important woman artist I Gusti Ayu Kadek Murniashi (1966 – 2006), with a combined estimated price of between IDR 18 – 25 million, and lot #520 Bali Life by Ketut Gelgel, which has an estimated price of between IDR 95 – 110 million.

i gusti ayu kadek murniashi "di malam ini" image courtesy of larasati                  “Di Malam Ini” – I Gusti Ayu Kadek Murniashi (Murni)

 

New collectors have opportunities to enter the market with lot #507 Hierarkie by Susilo Budi Purwanto, Berburu Kuda, lot# 512 by Made Wiradana, and two abstract oil paintings, lot #540 Kampung Nelayan Kusamba and lot #541 Gunungan Semar by noted Javanese painter Bagong Kussudiardjo (1928-2004), and the beautiful flowing flora and fauna forms within Burung Burung Bangau, lot #573 by Dewa Ketut Rungun. Emerging Balinese artist Ngakan Putu Agus Arta Wijaya is a young artist worth keeping an eye on, with excellent technical skills, good ideas and a distinctive style, lot# 508 Upgrade comes with an estimated price of between IDR 7.5 – 9 million.

Other popular artists within the sale are renowned Dutch colourist Arie Smit, Otto Djaja, Mochtar Apin, Jehan, Ida Bagus Nyoman Rai, Nyoman Dewa Jati, Dewa Putu Bedil and Agung Mangu Putra.

For buyers seeking to invest it is important to have a strategy, with the view of buying and holding for at least 10-15 years, and to invest early in an artist before everyone is getting on to the market. Look for works that are rare and unique – uniqueness referring to the quality and how often the artist makes such image or composition. A painting’s provenance is important for the established taste and also for authenticity, with the more prominent the previous owners, the better. This also includes the works history of exhibitions and inclusion in books or catalogues.

ida bagus made poleng "taris bali" image courtesy of larasati                           “Taris Bali” – Ida Bagus Made Poleng

 

Potential buyers bidding over the phone, or via real-time Internet bidding who are unable to attend the previews days or auction are advised to contact Larasati and enquire about the colour reproduction accuracy of the images contained within the online catalogue to ensure that what they wish to purchase can be realistically appraised. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue description does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections, therefore condition reports of the works, outlining the paintings current state and whether it has repairs or over painting, are available upon request.

Provenance, the historical data of the works previous owner/s is also important and is provided. An information guide including before the auction, during the auction and after the auction details, including conditions of business, the bidding process, payment, storage and insurance, and shipping of the work is also available. A buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer of each lot at rate of 22% of the hammer price of the lot.

The online catalogue, complete with a guide for prospective buyers is available at: www.larasati.com

Larasati Bali Art Space at Tebesaya Gallery

Jalan Jatayu, Banjar Tebesaya, Peliatan,

Ubud, Gianyar Bali, Indonesia

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Courtesy: Larasati

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bali Art Scene 2016: The Final Six Months Overview

15878100_120300001416662373_1113857188_oBudi Agung Kuswara with patient from Rumah Berdaya, a community based psycho-social rehabilitation center utilizing art as a tool for creative solutions.

 

The concluding six months of events on the 2016 Bali art calendar were exceptionally busy; the following are some of the highlights of the closing half of the year:

In late May contemporary artist Budi Agung Kuswara, co-founder of Ketemu Project Space, began his special art project in Denpasar, co facilitated by a professional psychiatrist at “Rumah Berdaya”, a community based psycho-social rehabilitation center utilizing art as a tool for creative solutions. The project continued throughout the year providing activities for people with schizophrenia to encourage social interactions through art making, productivity and independence while expressing their ideas and thinking.

Skizofriends Art Movement will be an ongoing program following on from the success of Budi and colleague’s lobbying of the Denpasar Government to become supporters. In 2017 it will become a part of the Denpasar City Department Health Care Program, while Skizofriends Art Movement was involved in activities at the Denpasar Festival 2016 28-31 December at Lapangan Puputan, Denpasar.   Budi must be congratulated on this initiative aimed at empowering individuals and building community through engaging the public through the potent creative forces of art.

made-valasaraValasara’s Konstruksi semesta, semesta yang teralienasi menpertanyakan kediriannya dalam ekspresi tunggal.

Made Valasara made a conspicuous presence during ArtJog 9’s Universal Influence 27 May opening at the Jogja National Museum in Yogyakarta, Central Java. Being the only Bali based Balinese artist invited to exhibit his work was both an honour and an excellent opportunity for exposure to large national and international audiences. Valasara’s installation, konstruksi semesta, semesta yang teralienasi menpertanyakan kediriannya dalam ekspresi tunggal, a series of 25 individual works of various sizes, overall dimensions of 230 x 520cm stood out for its originality.

Adopting the canvas as a standalone medium, along with sewing techniques, he layers and fills the canvas to create 3 dimensional embossed and debossed compositions. His small white figures, presented behind glass revealed his evolving technique with the innovation of his debossed works. Valasara’s attention to narrative development too, revealed an engaging Balinese narrative.

widyantara-i-gede-late-hero-115-x-81-cm-acrylic-on-canvas-2015Gede Widyantara’s Last Hero 2016 which may be viewed upside down to reveal a demonic face.

Traces Under the Surface: Batuan Painting Exhibition, 3 June -31 July at TiTian Art Space, Ubud explored artistic lineage that evolved in the renowned village of traditional painting, Batuan. The exhibition focussed upon the teacher/student relationship following on from Nyoman Ngendon (1906-1946), a multi talented artist and innovator who experimented with perspectives, creating “unreal” 3 dimensionality within the early rigid framework of the Batuan paintings. Ngendon’s great distinction was that he believed in sharing his techniques, while persuading his students to break with traditions and become art innovators themselves.

Traces Under the Surface featured the lineage of Wayan Taweng (1922-2004) who learned to paint primarily from Ngendon, beginning at the age of eight, and later teaching his sons Ketut Sadia (b.1966), Wayan Diana (b.1977) and Made Griyawan (b.1979), along with others. Paintings by the fore mentioned Balinese artists, and Taweng’s grandson Gede Widyantara (b.1984) proved to be some of the finest examples of the Batuan genre and its process of innovation. Widyantara’s talent, that belies his age, reveals that the future of Batuan painting will indeed by exciting.

imhatthai-suwwathanasilp-murnis-temple-mixed-media-human-hair-thread-wood-glue-31-x-18-x-10-cm-image-courtesy-of-ketemu-project-spaceSleeping Murni by Thai artist Imhathai Suwatthanaslip, made with Murni’s hair.

A unique, palpable buzz welcomed the opening of Merayakan Murni (Celebrating Murni) 16 July at Sudakara Art Space, Sanur. The project, which gathered local and regional artists to create works in response to the legacy of the iconic female Balinese artist I GAK Murniasih (1966-2006) “Murni” proved to be one of the most anticipated Bali art events of recent history. Some of the highlights were works by artists Illa from Singapore, renowned Dutch “Indonesian” artist Mella Jaarsma, Imhathai Suwatthanaslip from Thailand, along with Punia Atmaja and Citra Sasmita from Bali.

Murni was an artist of rare quality, unequalled in Indonesia at least. Along with such reverence comes great emotional attachment to the artist by her many friends and admirers, the exhibition therefore was not without critics. Some critics stated the Sudakara venue was too small and the exhibition included too many international artists, and as a consequence failed grant enough space in order for Murni’s ouvre to be fully appreciated by the audience, many of which had yet to be exposed to her work.

Others thought the exhibition overly ambitious, attempting to achieve too much, too soon, while the film about Murni could have represented a more positive theme. Event organizers Ketemu Project Space, along with their young and energetic team proved, however that their presence on the Bali art scene is indeed exciting, with enormous, yet to be realized potential.

20160703_112528                            At The Point of View#4 – Radwin Nurlatif

At The Point of View opened Friday 1 July at Santrian Gallery Sanur, with Radwin Nurlatif presenting one of the most outstanding photography exhibitions of 2016. Curated by Rifky Effendy, the exhibition captivated not only for its high standards of technical quality and presentation of superbly beautiful aesthetic and conceptual images (giclée prints on Hahnemühle photo rag ultra smooth 305 gsm), yet in the simplicity of some of the digital images that wonderfully contrasted women with nature, or women in surreal compositions.

kemal-ezedine-2016-asj-image-richard-horstmanKemal Ezedine was represented by Edwin’s Gallery Jakarta at Art Stage Jakarta 2016

The presence of Balinese artists at Indonesia’s two international art fairs held in Jakarta, Art Stage Jakarta 5-7 August & Bazaar Art Jakarta 2016 25-28 August help to consolidate Bali’s growing presence on the Indonesian art world, which during recent years has tended to be dominated by artists from Java and West Sumatra. While Art Stage, among its hundreds of exhibitors featured only three Indonesian Bali based artists, Agung Mangu Putra, Made Valasara and Kemal Ezedine (along with Ashley Bickerton), Bazaar Art Jakarta, on the other hand featured the work of 13 artists.

From the traditional genre was Nyoman Meja (b. 1950, Ubud), others artists present were Nyoman Gunarsa, Made Wianta, Nyoman Erawan, Agung Mangu Putra, Gede Mahendra Yasa, Wayan Kun Adnyana, Teja Astawa, Kemal Ezedine, Ketut Moniarta, Tang Adiawan, Putu Wirantawan, Wayan Mandiyasa and Ketut Sumadi. Erawan’s installation at the Mon Décor Art One booth provided a strong contrast to what was on display at the fair, while being deeply engaging.

mangu-putra-pura-puncak-mangu-2016-oil-on-canvas-200x300cm                Pura Puncak Mangu 2016 – Agung Mangu Putra

Paskal Gallery’s acute eye for display, allowing attendees from a distance to be captured by the alluring and mysterious qualities of the 190 x 290 cm oil on canvas composition Pura Puncak Mangu, by Agung Mangu Putra confirmed why he is regarded as one of Indonesia’s most respected painters. His scene of a group of Balinese people praying at the remote mountain top temple in Buleleng was one of the highlights of Bazaar Art. The Neo Pitamaha collective made a strong presence at Bazaar Art with works exhibited by four artists and Jakarta’s Edwin’s Gallery confirmed their confidence in Kemal Ezedine by dedicating their entire booth at both fairs to the Ubud resident artist.

Sanur based Swedish painter Richard Winkler, also present at both fairs represented by Zola Zulu Gallery of Bandung, also enjoyed strong sales with his eye-catching and technically brilliant ‘utopian Bali’ compositions. Sotheby’s presented contemporary works by Mangu Putra and Mahendra Yasa in the preview of their Hong Kong Autumn Sale, while Sidharta Auctioneers presented Gunarsa and Meja, and ISA Art Advisory presented modern works by Arie Smit (1919-2016) and Adrian Le Mayeur (1880-1958).

ida-bagus-made-nadera-fajar-mengjingsing-1949                   Ida Bagus Made Nadera – Fadjar Mengjingsing 1945

A landmark event in the history of Indonesian modern art, held from 2 – 30 August at Jakarta’s National Gallery of Indonesia was 17/71, Goresan Juang Kemerdekaan (Brushstrokes of the Independence Struggle). Presenting 28 paintings from the collection (over 3000 works) assembled by Indonesia’s founding father President Sukarno the exhibition was opened on August 17th, on the 71st anniversary of the proclamation of independence by the Indonesian President Joko Widodo.

Ida Bagus Made Nadera’s (1912-1988) beautiful 188 x 300 cm modern traditional composition Fadjar Mengjingsing made a special presence, along with works by Walter Spies and Rudolf Bonnet in an exhibition featuring scenes of the independence struggle by Indonesian maestros such as Affandi, Sudjojono and Srihadi alongside pictures of iconic Indonesia.

20160827_191628                                                  Arie Smit (1916-2016)

During the 27 August seminar at Ubud’s Neka Art Museum, a gathering of over 100 members of the Balinese art community, and distinguished guests Suteja Neka and Agung Rai, and paid homage to the legacy of the Dutch post-modern colourist Arie Smit (1916-2016). The iconic painter, who left a distinguished mark in the history of art in the region, passed away 23 March, only days short of his 100th birthday.

Renowned for his vibrant landscape paintings and scenes of Balinese village life Smit is a much-loved artist; his work forms part of collections in Indonesia, and throughout the world.

He started teaching painting to young boys in the village of Penestanan in 1960, beginning the “Young Artists Style”, while at its height there were more than 300 practitioners. He helped transform the village, and prosper economically, being both an art teacher and a father figure to the village. Smit’s passing is a monumental loss to the canon of Southeast Asian art, while the Young Artist Style is one of the most exciting developments in Balinese art in the later half of the 20th Century.

made-wianta-receives-the-award-from-bali-governor-mangu-pastikaMade Wianta receives the Bali Mandara Parama Nugraha 2016 Award from the Governor Mangku Pastika.

A special 30 August ceremony at Taman Budaya Cultural Center Denpasar by the Bali Government honoured local figures who have made important contributions to Bali. An icon of Bali contemporary art, internationally renowned, Made Wianta (b. 1949, Tabanan) received the Bali Mandara Parama Nugraha 2016 Award from the Governor Mangku Pastika in highest appreciation of promoting Bali through contemporary art.

14642015_1359257894086482_2982552466485278854_n

Often overshadowed by the southern regencies of Gianyar, Badung and Tabanan, Buleleng is not only home to a unique Balinese art history (Van Der Tuuk in 1845 and his commissioning of Balinese artists work for his research into the first dictionary of the Balinese language), yet a community of talented artists. Exhibitions by artists from Buleleng are held annually in the southern regencies, and on 22 October Qilin – Membaca Social Budaya Warga Pecinan Kota Singaraja (Socio-cultural readings of Singaraja’s Chinatown Residents) opened at Neka Art Museum in Ubud, and continued for one month.

Based upon curatorial research led by Hardiman, from the Art Department of UNDISKHA University in Singaraja, along with his young team of Made Susanta Dwitanaya, Dewa Gede Purwita, Ketut Wisana Ariyanto and Gede Panca Gautama, into the culture of the Chinese Tionghoa community, the group exhibition delved into spiritual and religious practises, artefacts and there traces, stories from their literature, and portraits of figures from the community. Of the many highlights were the eight collective works, including Spreading Qilin, an installation of terracotta Chinese dragon characters.

20161023_161947A Brutal Contrast of Concrete and Kamasan Painting combined street art along with paintings from selected emerging local talent from Batuan, Ubud, Tabanan and Denpasar.

Cahyendra Putra and the Neo Pitamaha Invite You To: A Brutal Contrast of Concrete and Kamasan Painting opened 23 October will be recorded in the annals of Balinese art history. The outsider exhibition, which in many ways was noteworthy, was underpinned by a long-awaited and fresh approach to presenting art in Ubud, outside of the conventional gallery, art space and museum format.

This collaborative project, organized by Kemal Ezedine, features street art by artists from Bali & Jakarta, along with paintings from selected emerging local talent from Batuan, Ubud, Tabanan and Denpasar. Set within the gutted interior of a building, twenty young artists revealed their interpretation of the famous Bali 1930’s Pita Maha artist’s association in dynamic contemporary art that challenges the establishment. Highlights included works by Wayan Budiarta, Wayan Aris Sumanta and street artists Ego, Saf, Ola, and Slinart.

20160817_111722                                      Bali LandscapesWillem Kerseboom

Bali Landscapes by Dutch painter Willem Kerseboom opened at TiTian Art Space, Ubud 28 October (continuing until late January 2017). Kerseboom, who shares his time between Holland/Belgium and his home North Bali presented acrylic landscape compositions of a rare quality. His imaginary, abstract snapshots, are deeply engaging, while being a fine creative contribution to the long line of Dutch artists who have been inspired by Bali.

jiri-kudrna-light-plane-photography                             Light Plain Photographs – Jiri Kudrna

Ubud based Swiss engineer and software developer Jiri Kudrna, a pioneer in experimental photography has made major contributions to the development of contemporary photography. Kudrna’s contributions to Age of Photography #2, open 15 – 28 November at the National Gallery of Indonesia, Jakarta were from his inventions that created Light Plain Photographs (LPP), and his three interactive installations, Space – Time Variations.

 LPP’s are fantastic images using a plain of light and a camera to record photographs with unique optic effects – a fusion of the four-time space dimensions – while the subject is housed within a dark room and participates within their own unique photographic procedure. Kudrna’s Space – Time Variations were very popular with exhibition audience who created over 1800 pictures in four days, and were also able to upload the images onto social media platforms.

Power Playing works by Arum & Ida Adi.jpg                      Power Playing – Images by Arum & Ida Adi at Lingkara

Lingkara Photography Community of Denpasar is an alternative platform for contemporary photographers in Bali. Over recent years Lingkara have presented a range of quality collaborative exhibitions and events. Driven by a small core group of dedicated artists Lingkara not only strive to support the collective, yet seek out professional opportunities by engaging with and representing artists via product development and management.

Power Playing opened 20 November presenting mostly large-scale works by Candra Mpu Glimblond, Christina Arum, Ida Adi, Ismail Ilmi, Rudi Waisnawa and S.R. Awy. While the artists individual techniques involved varying processes, such as re printing images, painting, collage with the help of additional tools, mirrors, candles and magnifying tools to make impressions, the final large-scale results which were applied to the walls were a single photograph without digital enhancement. Lingkara are making important contributions to the development of contemporary photography in Bali and Power Playing was a very strong collective showing, while Arum’s technically labor intensive work was one of the highlights.

mangu-putra-2016-puputan-badung-the-fall-of-badung-kingdom-2-oil-on-canvas-370-x-150-cm         Puputan Badung 1906 (The Fall of Badung Kingdom # 1) – Agung Mangu Putra

Agung Mangu Putra: Between History and the Quotidian ran from 25 November – 12 December at Singapore’s Gajah Gallery. Mangu Putra continues his research into critical Dutch colonial events that shaped Indonesian and Balinese history. Highlights were Puputan Badung 1906 (The Fall of Badung Kingdom # 1& 2) 2016 & 2014, compositions pieced together from archival accounts and images into enormous paintings up 370 x 1590 cm in size. The works reveal the story of the Dutch colonial army’s confrontation with the Kingdom of Badung in Kesiman, Denpasar in 1906 that resulted in the tragic puputan event (act of ritual suicide).

Mangu Putra’s investigation into these events are important because these events occurred during a crucial era of the nation’s history and theses events without more historical examination may become historical myths.

20170103_170338                     Ashley Bickerton‘s sculptures at Follow the White Cube

The Pop-Up gallery concept is new to Ubud, Bali and was successfully adopted by Honold Fine Art twice in 2016. Follow the White Cube opened 26 November at Italian artist Filippo Sciascia’s studio in Nyuh Kuning. The exhibition featured work by artists Jumaldi Alfi, Marco Cassani, Ashley Bickerton, Fendry Ekel, Bepi Ghiotti, Yusra Mantunus, Narcisse Tordior and Filippo Sciascia.

Set within a ‘white cube’ display areas that lent well to strong, yet conventional viewing experience, the works ranged from paintings through to sculpture, installation and video art presented exciting contrasts. While the spontaneity of the Pop-Up concept is a fresh and much-needed addition to the Ubud art scene.

doors-of-perception-made-aswino-aji                              Doors of Perception 2016 – Made Aji Aswino

CROSSING: Beyond Baliseering presented some of the finest emerging contemporary artist from Bali at Forty-Five Downstairs Gallery, Melbourne, Australia, open 6 December. Reflecting upon Bali’s visual and social culture while exploring themes of personal life experiences, environmental, social and political issues in the contemporary society, the exhibition showcased paintings, photography, sculptures, and large-scale installations.

In the most important international group showing of Balinese contemporary art outside of Indonesia that featured Art of Whatever, Made Aji Aswino, Budi Agung Kuswara, Citra Sasmita, Kemal Ezedine, Made ‘Dalbo’ Suarimbawa, Natisa Jones, Slinat, Made Valasara, Wayan Upadana and Yoesoef Olla, highlights included Aswino Aji’s monumental two-sided wood craving installation, Doors of Perception 2016, 250 x 300 x 80 cm, a representation of a candi (traditional Balinese temple entry), along with works by‘Dalbo’ Suarimbawa, Upadana, Slinart and Citra Sasmita.

5-kasper-x-nedsone-teges-ubud                                 Lukas Kasper& Nedsone at work during Way Up

Bali’s ever evolving street art movement is increasingly discovering new sights to enliven along the streets of urban Denpasar and within the villages of the Badung and Gianyar Regencies. Way UpStreet Art Collaboration Project initiated by Cata Odata, Allcapsstore and Lukas Kasper began in November 2016 and will continue through until the end of January 2017.

The project was born through the meeting of Cata Odata and Australian artist Lukas Kasper beginning with the idea to contribute vibrantly to Ubud’s street areas and to collaborate with nine street artists from Bali on 20 walls. Local artists include Nedsone, Kmis3, Lezart, Slinat, Yapstwo, Sleeck, and 1escv. The event included the Way Up online map on the website and the 17 December Spray Jam workshop, and Kelas Belajar sharing session 18 December at Cata Odat, and the #UbudScavengerHunt. 17 December through 11 January which will include a prize to the winner.

http://way-up.cataodata.com/follow-the-map.html

putu-wirantawan-2016                  Contemporary Art from Bali – Installation by Putu Wirantawan 2016

Contemporary Art from Bali opened 15 December at LAF (Langgeng Art Foundation) Yogyakarta, and continues through until 31 January 2017. Curated by Rifky Effendy and Gede Mahendra Yasa the show featured some of the finest contemporary artists currently working in Bali, foreigners, Indonesians and Balinese: Ketut Susena, Ketut Samadi, Made Aswino Aji, Teja Astawa, Natisa Jones, Wayan Mandiyasa, Ketut Suwidiarta, Putu Wirantawan, Ashley Bickerton, Marco Cassani, Filippo Sciascia, Ketut Moniarta, Kemal Ezedine, Wayan Upadana, Made Valasara and Rodney Glick.

Overshadowed by the traditional art scene, and often overlooked within the context of the Indonesian art world contemporary art and the art infrastructure is on the rise in Bali. Making an important statement within the context of Indonesian contemporary art, in the Javanese cultural and creative heartland with its ever-evolving art infrastructure and eco system, this exhibition is the most important collective showing of contemporary art from Bali held in Indonesia in 2016.

20161230_175209                        Inside of Being  – Installation by Pande Ketut Taman 2016

The 30 December opening at the Tony Raka Art Gallery punctuated the end of 2016 and friendship and creative achievement by four Balinese contemporary artists, alumni of the Indonesian Art Insititue SI Yogyakarta. Inside of Being highlighted the talents of Putu Sutawijaya, Made Sumadiyasa, Made Mahendra Mangku & Pande Ketut Taman, artists who have shared friendships for over 30 years, while at the same time during their individual careers making significant contributions to the development of Balinese art. The exhibition, which includes paintings, both small and large-scale, and installations will continue through until 30 January, including an Artist’s Talk from 3pm 5 January at Tony Raka Art Gallery.

Such a report would not be fully complete without highlighting the stoic efforts of Warih Witsatsana and his small army of dedicated assistants at the Bentara Budaya Bali Cultural Center. Their consistent weekly programs throughout the year are a shining light in the support and development of Bali’s thriving creative culture.

With an emphasis upon education via lectures, discussions, presentations and hands on workshops, especially for the younger generations, Bentara Budaya’s one of a kind model is an inspiration to other aspiring art and cultural facilities on the island. 2016’s broad range of events, including numerous collaborations with international artists, institutes, and organizations highlights their open platform to global cultural expressions, while underlining Bali’s internationally renowned welcoming attitude to foreign cultures and creative expressions.

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Richard Horstman & various photographers

 

 

 

 

Mangu Putra: Between History and the Quotidian

mangu-putra-2016-puputan-badung-the-fall-of-badung-kingdom-2-oil-on-canvas-370-x-150-cm                     Puputan Badung #2, 2016 (The Fall of the Badung Kingdom)

After a wait of six years Bali’s most important painter Agung Mangu Putra has followed on from Teater Rakyat (People Theater), his landmark 2010 exhibition at Galeri Nasional Indonesia, Jakarta.

Mangu Putra: Between History and the Quotidian opened at Singapore’s Gajah Gallery 25 November, featuring nine paintings made between 2013 – 2016. Renowned for his technical abilities, and his commitment to environmental, social and historical themes that trigger deep sentiments, Mangu Putra’s hyper realism style communicates important narratives that ignite potent emotions.

mangu-putra-2015-puputan-badung-the-fall-of-badung-kingdom-1906-oil-on-canvas-190x390-cm                    Puptan Badung #1, 2015 (The Fall of the Kingdom of Badung)

Spiritual Landscapes, Mangu Putra’s 2005 solo exhibition in Gajah Gallery was an offering of gratitude to the landscape of his homeland, and his Balinese Hindu culture, paying homage via dramatic monochrome compositions that reflect his deep sense of spirituality. In Teater Rakyat (People Theater) Mangu Putra’s critical social commentary came to the fore. He focused upon the marginalized within the Balinese society, people from the economically destitute regions of Bali, female gender politics, the forgotten Independence War veterans who bravely confronted the KNIL Dutch forces between 1945-49.

In Between History and the Quotidian Mangu Putra continues his research and discovery into critical Dutch colonial events that shaped Indonesian and Balinese history. Puputan Badung 1906 (The Fall of Badung Kingdom # 1, 2 &3) 2016, 2016 & 2014 have been “pieced together” from archival accounts and images sourced from the internet into enormous compositions ranging in size up 190 x 390 cm. Telling the story of the Dutch colonial army’s confrontation with the Kingdom of Badung in Kesiman, Denpasar in 1906 that resulted in the tragic puputan event (act of ritual suicide).

mangu-putra-2015-puputan-badung-the-fall-of-badung-kingdom-3-oil-on-linen-200-x-154-cm                         Puptan Badung #3, 2014 (The Fall of the Kingdom of Badung)

Jim Supangkat in the exhibition catalogue writes, “Mangu Putra never translates exact copies of those photographs into his works, instead he sometimes manipulates several photos and incorporates them into his paintings.”

The painting tells the story of the Dutch colonial army’s confrontation with the Kingdom of Badung in Kesiman, Denpasar in 1906, that resulted in the tragic puputan event (act of ritual suicide) when the Balinese rulers chose to fight to the death rather than surrender.

The Fall of Badung Kingdom # 2, 2016 reveals senior officials of the Dutch army seated behind the body of the Raja of Badung, I Gusti Ngurah Made Agung, in a post puputan pose, a reconstruction of possible events. Mangu Putra positions the Raja’s throne next to his prostrate body as a symbolic gesture.

mangu-putra-2016-adu-jago-1947-oil-on-linen-200-x-200-cm                                        Adu Jago, 2016 (Cock Fight)

“Mangu Putra does not reproduce reality as with other realistic paintings, but paints his account of the light’s reflection,” said Supangkat of Mangu Putra’s technique.

“The resulting image is a textured realistic painting, with apparent contrasting effects caused by the beam of light on the painted surface. The aesthetic qualities present in his works – lines, textures, contrast effects – as a result permeate a narrative filled story on his canvases.”

mangu-putra-2016-dalam-pengawasan-kolonial-200-x-200-cm-oil-on-linen           Dalam Pengawasan Kolonial, 2016 (Under Colonial Supervision)

“Mangu Putra, like many of Bali’s modern and contemporary artists, was trained in Yogyakarta at Indonesia’s premier art school, ISI, the Institute Seni Indonesia,” states Professor of Southeast Asian History Adrian Vickers in the exhibition catalogue.

“Unlike many others who emerged through painting, Mangu Putra was trained in graphic arts and design, and his original career was in advertising. The sensibilities he developed in presenting the mundane to the world meant that he is attuned to the effect power of images. He turned to problems of how such images should be made to work in the world in a more critical fashion.”

In Eksekusi Letda Reta (Execution of Letda Reta), 2014, Mangu Putra depicts the execution of his uncle I Gusti Agung Alit Reta, who along with his father both fought in the Independence War, Alit Reta being captured and later executed by the Dutch. In the painting he appropriates the style of Francisco Goya’s The Third of May (1814) – which depicts a death sentence served on a rebel farmer by a Spanish firing squad. Here Mangu Putra imagines the moment of his uncle’s execution as one of defiance.

mangu-putra-2014-eksekusi-letda-reta-oil-on-canvas-190-x-290-cm                            Eksekusi Letda Reta (Execution of Letda Reta), 2014

Adu Jago (Cock Fight) 2016 reveals a scene where Dutch troops and Balinese are watching a cock-fight. One roaster yells to the other: “Are you ready to surrender?” The other responds: “I am not going to retreat.” According to Supangkat the universal message in this painting, along with Eksekusi Letda Reta is that the concept of authority is a threat that has never subsided, though the power behind that authority may always change.

In Transit? 2016 Mangu Putra reveals an extremely interesting, yet little known story within the history of the Dutch East Indies of a Germany aircraft, with swastika emblems, that flew from Brandenberg, Germany to Medan, Sumatra, Batavia, Surabaya and landed in Buleleng, Bali 7 January 1938.

“Photographs contain layers of narratives, and within these there are always hidden meanings that I am driven to delve into,” said Mangu Putra.

mangu-putra-2016-transit-oil-on-canvas-390x190-cm                                              Transit? 2016

“Mangu Putra is not a historian, yet his intuition is sharp in detecting these milestones in history. He feels that these phenomenal milestones are substantial to further the research on the connection between Indonesian and world history, writes Supangkat in summing up his essay titled “Identity Politics” in the exhibition catalogue, and later continues,

“Indonesian history still requires the pursuit of historical examination, so that history doesn’t become a myth of the present,”

Both Mangu Putra’s investigation along with Jim Supangkat’s accompanying essay are important documentations of a crucial era of the nation’s history and collectively combine into one of the most important Indonesian contemporary art exhibitions in recent history.

mangu-putra-2016-menjelang-merdeka-acrylic-on-linen-70x80cm                       Menjelang Merdeka, 2016 (Towards Freedom)

Mangu Putra: Between History and the Quotidian

25 November – 11 December 2016.

Gajah Gallery Singapore

 

Words: Richard Horstman

 

ABAD FOTOGRAFI: the Age of Photography #2

yasu-suzuka_resized                Tapestry of Buddhist Monks Hands – Installation by Yasu Suzuka

The origins of the ABAD FOTOGRAFI – The Age of Photography exhibition that opened at the National Gallery of Indonesia in Jakarta 15 November may be traced back to 2013, and the artistic and cultural heartland of Bali, Ubud.

A small group of senior photographers from Jakarta traveled to Bali to do some shooting assignments and met up with expat photographers from various countries who reside in Bali. This spontaneous meet-up developed into serious discussion and eventually expanded, involving more photographers, both local and international.

Inspired by developments and the diversity in the world of photography, the idea of organizing a joint exhibition came about to show this diversity; an exhibition featuring photography of the most conventional, to the most progressive works.

sjaiful-boen                ‘Pemahaman Nenek Luh…!!!’– Installation by Sjaiful Boen

The Age of Photography – Intentions and Transparency in Photographs opened 12 December 2013 at the Tony Raka Art Gallery in Ubud, presenting the work of leading Indonesian and expatriate professional and amateur photographers. Senior Indonesian curator Jim Supangkat brought together 29 photographers from Indonesia, America, Japan, Australia and Europe in an exhibition full of contrasts and delights.

One of the highlights was by Swiss born engineer and software developer Jiri Kudrna, a pioneer in experimental photography. Kudrna’s photo machine created fantastic images – a fusion of the four time space dimensions – housed within a dark room in the gallery and allowed observers to participate within his unique procedure.

“The picture take process is a complex choreography between the photographer, model and machine with often almost unpredictable results. Randomness is a desired and calculated part of the process,” Kudrna said.

james-wilkins                                                  Conflict – James Wilkins

Given the current revolution in digital smartphone technology that includes cameras as a functional component photography is now been accessed by the masses. While most are obsessed with self-empowerment via “selfies” and posting the images onto social media platforms, many too are exploring the greater creative and practical potentials of photography. As a consequence the opening of The Age of Photography #2 in Jakarta attracted an enormous crowd, along with much media attention.

The exhibition featured a huge array of diversity by a group of twenty local and international photographers. Works are printed on stone, acrylic glass, cloth and bamboo, cyanotypes, pinhole shots, analog processed pictures, hi-res landscapes, along with abstract images difficult to identify as photographs. While being more experimental than the first exhibition in 2013 some of the highlights of The Age of Photography #2 include American photographer, artist and designer based in New York and Bali James Wilkins’ two technically perfect, huge abstracts of body armor.

Conflict is a complex, layered consideration of both the interpersonal, micro aspects of psychology and being, and the macro themes of conflict throughout the history of time,” Wilkins said.

kun-tanubrata                                  Images by Kun Tanubrata

Popular with the local media, Indonesian photographer Sjaiful Boen exhibited two political,  controversial, and censored installations, ‘Pemahaman Nenek Luh…!!!’ & “As Your Grandmother’s Understanding…!!!’ featuring Jakarta’s currently besieged Governor Ahok. Boen’s interactive installations talk to the audience.

Renowned Japanese photographer Yasu Suzuka (b.1947) contributes an impressive installation Tapestry of Buddhist Monks Hands, featuring textiles with large black and white dye printed images of praying monk hands, hung in unison. His installation resonates with a potent contemplative aura while being a message for world peace. At the center of the ‘Praying Hands’ work there is a pinhole photograph showing the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Dome in Japan.

Prominent Balinese painter Agung Mangu Putra works shine with the simplicity and genius. De Ja Vu #5, a black and white image printed on paper captures a twisted cloth seemingly captured floating in mid air, set against gloomy skies and an ocean seascape. “Photography is a medium that allows me to express ideas and thoughts that I cannot achieve using conventional mediums,” Mangu Putra said.

jiri-kudrna-1                                 Light Plane Photographs by Jiri Kudrna

Indonesian photographer Hermandari Kartowisastra (b.1943) presents two beautiful black and white minimal landscape images printed on aluminum silver brush, Ekuilibrium 1 & 2. Presenting the works side-by-side she splits the images in the middle with the horizon line contrasting light and dark skies upon empty, surreal landscapes. Kun Tanubrata (b.1947) exhibits four beautiful works printed on rattan mats, Aku Bertanya is both elegant yet haunting in its simplicity and comes complete within the exhibition catalog with a complementing poetic verse.

Again Jiri Kudrna’s work was a highlight of the exhibition, presenting six Light Plane Photographs (LPP) created with his experimental machines, half printed on acrylic glass and the remainder printed on brushed aluminum. His three interactive installations, Space – Time Variations were very popular, the audience creating over 1800 pictures in four days.

jiri-kudrna-3                         Space – Time Variations Installation by Jiri Kudrna

“The most satisfactory thing for me is to watch the Indonesian kids experimenting with my installations, being creative and having fun,” Kudrna said.   LPP is a technique invented by Kudrna uses a plane of light and a camera to record photographs with unique optic effects.

ABAD FOTOGRAFI – The Age of Photography

Continues through unti 28 November at the National Gallery of Indonesia.

More images may be accessed on Facebook.com/abadfotografi &

@abadfotografi on Twitter

r-haryanto                                               Images by R. Haryanto

Words: Richard Horstman