Indonesian artist Ichwan Noor’s Abu Dhabi F1 exposé

Noor's works received large local and international media exposure. Image courtesy I. NoorInternational media shooting in front of Noor’s Beetle Sphere at the 2017 Formula One Etihad Airways Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, held at the Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi, 23-26 November, 2017.

 

Reaching out to new audiences, across diverse sectors of the society to attract greater appreciation and acceptance of art is an ongoing process for artists, and the art industry. In recent years the Indonesian contemporary art world has held successful events merging with the fashion and design worlds, gaining increased exposure and popularity for the leading brands, including fairs, galleries and the artists themselves.

Yogyakarta based artist Ichwan Noor, recently, had a unique opportunity to capture the attention of a perhaps an unlikely sector of the public – the international Formula One racing industry and F1 fans. He exhibited three of his sculptures at the 2017 Formula One Etihad Airways Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, held at the Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi, 23-26 November.

Upon invitation from the Yas Marina Circuit Noor exhibited three of his iconic works, inspired by the motor vehicle, in Art@Yas, a side program conducted at the main grandstand during the Middle East’s biggest international event. The final race of the 2017 calendar attracted a crowd of over 60,000 people. Noor’s creations enthralled the local and international audience, many of whom were amazed to see the classic, arguably the most recognizable four-wheeler on the planet, breathtakingly transformed.

Ichwan Noor's three works at Art@Yas, Yas Marina Circuit, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates - Image I. Noor                         Noor’s works at the Yas Marina Circuit

Caste in aluminum, featuring original auto parts of the VW beetle, 180cm in diameter, Beetle Sphere, colored black, and Beetle Sphere, colored grey are a continuation of an on going series the artist began in 2011. First exhibited internationally at Art Basel Hong Kong 2013, the works feature the 1953 Volkswagen Beetle reconfigured in a variety of new shapes, including cubes and spheres. The Beetle Sphere features in the collections of several major national and private institutions in Indonesia, Australia (National Gallery of  Victoria), Germany, China, Turkey, U.S.A., Sweden and India. Noor’s third work, Got Wood, 2017, 495 x 180 x 150 cm, is a to scale replica of a F1 racing car constructed from scraps of mahogany and teak wood.

According to Noor’s artist statement, “The idea behind my sculptures emerged from a insight towards objects that are products of a ‘transportation culture’, which induce signs of spiritual emotion – to behold a vehicle is to have a ‘magical’ or supernatural identity. By combining the techniques of manipulation and substitution, the sculptures form tends towards a realistic distortion allowing fresh interpretations about the object, and a shift in observation creating associative meanings.”

“The VW is familiar to almost everybody across the globe, no matter their age or social status. I see the VW Beetle as one of the most successful designs,” said the artist who graduated from the School of Visual Art at the Indonesia Institute of the Arts (ISI), Yogyakarta, and is a Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Yogyakarta.

F1 fans enjoy Noor's "Got Wood" a wooden replica of a F1 racing car            F1 fans enjoy Noor’s “Got Wood” a wooden replica of a F1 racing car

The works creation process involves Noor first making a polyurethane mould of a genuine Beetle carving a spherical polyurethane replica of the vehicle’s body and then casting it in aluminum. A separate spherical interior is produced and fitted to the cast exterior. The sculpture is then painted, fitted with acrylic windows and genuine trim pieces including lights, wheels and tyres.

Got Wood, (also called boyhood, manliness, or manhood) the artist said, “represents a set of traits, mannerisms, and characteristics associated with boys and men. Speed is an captivating symbol for some men who have great courage, while being a symbol of masculinity for strength, competition, courage and adventure.”

“As we all know, the Indonesian art infrastructure is still fragile so I try to take advantage of existing global infrastructure. With a limited local and world art markets it is important that artists interact with people beyond the artworld and exhibit in public spaces outside of the current gallery and museum system in order to make breakthroughts into new markets and art colections,” said the artist who was born in Jakarta in 1964, and is renowned for his large-scale sculptures of hybrid human, animal and technological forms, working with bronze, stainless steel, aluminum, various used materials and resin.

IMG_20171123_154306

The Middle East is no longer foreign to modern art with a lot of modern art being purchaseded by collectors from the region. In the world of contemporary art collections, however, collectors from this region are still lagging behind collectors from Asia. “For me the most important thing is to create a new art map outside of the map that is understood by Indonesian artists. Professionalism, of course, within the globalized art world is a necessity.”

“There is a serious and massive effort from the UAE to participate in the flow of the contemporary art world, which is directly related to their strategy that to raise the prestige of their country. This certainly will create many opportunities for Indonesian artists,” Noor adds, and suggests, “ artists should take the littlest of opportunities of getting involved in the global art infrastructure, and anything goes is a most appropriate expression for contemporary art works that we can take on the positive side.”

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Courtesy: IchwanNoor

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Upcoming exhibition highlights the collaborations between contemporary artists and inmates of Bali prison

Inmates involved in art workshops at Klungkung jail. - Image Mary Lou Pavlovic              Inmates participating in art making workshop at Klungkung jail.

 

In early April this year Australian contemporary artist, Mary Lou Pavlovic, was advised by the apexart gallery New York that the proposal she’d written in response to their open call Apex Franchise Exhibition, offering four funded exhibition opportunities, had been successful. Pavlovic ranked third out of almost four hundred proposals from sixty-one countries. Over two hundred international art expert jurors had voted for her proposal to curate an exhibition in Bali about artists and prisoners collaborations arising from prison workshops.

Apexart is a non-profit arts organization in Lower Manhattan, NYC, funded in part by the Andy Warhol Foundation, that offers opportunities to independent curators and emerging and established artists, and challenges ideas about art, its practice, and its curation.

“I received an email advising me to contact the apexart Director, Steven Rand, who said he had good news,” Pavlovic said.   “So I thought I’d better call Apex and tell them of a hoax someone was running about them. Then, when I called, to my surprise, they confirmed that I had been selected, and that it wasn’t a hoax at all!”

From 2012-16, when in Bali, Pavlovic had been a regular visitor to inmates inside Balinese jails where she had witnessed the humanitarian benefits of art programs. “Prisoner’s lives are placed on hold and their space confined to the parameters of a prison. I realized, although prisoners couldn’t physically move very far, they could travel great distances with their imaginations by participating in arts activities,” said the artist who lives and works between Bali, and Mittagong, Australia, and completed a PhD at Monash University, Melbourne.

Inmates artworks - flowers and berries set in resin.Image Mary Lou Pavlovicjpg

“Inmates could also learn valuable skills and undertake enjoyable activities to relieve the daily monotony of prison life.”

Pavlovic was also aware that practically universally a function of modern prisons is to hide prisoners away from the rest of society. An exhibition involving prisoners and artists, she thought, would help to break down this barrier. It would allow the public an opportunity to reflect on their own perceptions of prisoners and prisons, along with the prisoners the opportunity to be seen in the role of artistic producers, rather than solely as criminals, and of little value to society.

The upcoming exhibition, organized and curated by Pavlovic, Dipping in the Kool Aid, (American jail slang for entering uninvited into a conversation) will be held at the Tony Raka Art Gallery, in Ubud, Bali, in 4 – 31 March 2018. The show will feature the artworks of prisoners, artworks produced from workshops given by contemporary artists in the Bali prisons, and independently produced studio works by some of the invited artists relating to aspects of prison and the incarceration system.

Pavlovic is interested in taking the exhibition beyond a community type art show in which members of a social group are asked to express themselves through art, and the therapeutic benefits of that process becomes the exhibition theme. “Exhibitions displaying prisoners artworks are common, but I think that if our project’s aim was only to display prisoner’s artworks, regardless of their artistic capabilities, then professional artists may not need to be involved at all,” she said.

Inmates at Klungkung jail art making. Image courtesy M.L. Pavlovic                                    Inmates at Klungkung jail art making

“There are so many highly capable creative people in jails, and so I thought that a more interesting and challenging way to address the exhibition, than a straightforward community art show, would be through a type of artistic laboratory in which the artists and prisoners skills are equally valued.”

With these ideas in mind, Pavlovic invited foreign international artists and Indonesian artists to give a range of workshops predominantly in the Klungkung Prison, East Bali. The workshops began in August, continuing on until March 2018 prior to the exhibition. East Javanese artist Djunaidi Kenyut conducts workshops inviting inmates to etch their own portraits onto postcard size mirrors. The prisoners become active agents in shaping his idea, and the overall work. The outcomes are ghostly etchings with viewers reflected in them.

“In the Klungkung prison there are about 100 inmates of which there is one person who is very enthusiastic to participate in the workshops, and there are others who like to join in. But I am very happy to witness their passion to know and learn to try new activities such as drawing,” Kenyut said.

Pavlovic provides lectures for women inmates involving embedding living things, like flowers leaves and berries in resin, to preserve life. At the prisoner’s request the group have incorporated butterflies, yet as the program continues the prisoners will incorporate items into their works that are important to them, such as family photos.

Other workshops conducted include East Javanese artist Imam Sucahyo who is posting drawings to inmates requesting their input, and Australian contemporary sculptor Rodney Glick, who has invited prisoners to his cafe, Seniman, at the Tony Raka Art Gallery, for work experience and to learn about art.

IMG_20170922_112054

Glick said, the Seniman coffee ethos is to create happiness. “What better way for people who crave freedom than to work a little and enjoy a coffee on the outside!” Other artists included in the upcoming exhibition are internationally renowned Indonesian artists Agung Mangu Putra and Angki Purbandono, along with the Prison Art Program founding members, and Elizabeth Gower, Alannah Russack and Pavlovic.

 

Dipping in the Kool Aid

Upcoming 3 – 21 March 2018

Tony Raka Art Gallery, Mas, Ubud

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Mary Lou Pavlovic

 

 

 

Bruce Carpenter: presenting Indonesian art & culture to the world

BruceC-2a                                                          Bruce Carpenter

 

A lust for life and adventure, along with a generous dose of savvy have propelled New York City born and bred Bruce W. Carpenter around the planet.

The son of a young American soldier who returned from WWII with an upper class English bride, Carpenter found himself torn between the idealism and glory of old Britain and the cosmopolitan metropolis of his birth. In the end, the creative cauldron that was NYC in the 60s & 70s would be the winner.

“I found my sanctuary in the great museums and then seminal art scene of the “City” where I was introduced to the Underground Art Scene and the Beat Poets. This would lead on to the first happenings, the precursor of installations, in Soho lofts, Andy Warhol’s Factory, experimental theatre and film,” says Carpenter, who eventually channelled his creativity into filmmaking. Carpenter was also an eyewitness and full-blown inductee into the Woodstock Generation, having attended the concert, and the Age of Aquarius. He played in a Blues band and was a member of several theatre groups.

Lempad_cvr_300dpiLempad of Bali: the illuminating lineCarpenter, Darling, Hinzler, McGowan, Vickers, Widagdo

The election of Richard Nixon and the resurgence of the conservative right, along with the death of a brother who served during the Vietnam War, precipitated a leap across the Atlantic Ocean to the city of Amsterdam where idyllic hippie dreams were still raging on. After experiencing one long and miserable Northern European winter, Carpenter succumbed to exotic tales of the mystic East recited by a new breed of young travellers.

In 1974 he sold his camera and bought a one-way ticket to Bangkok. During the next 18 months he would explore the east crisscrossing the Malay Peninsula and Indonesia starting in Sumatra. Together with the Swiss artist-photographer, Charles Junod, they would scout out wild destinations and create surreal installations that they photographed. These would tour Europe in an exhibition of surreal photography sponsored by the Canon Gallery.

When Carpenter arrived on the island paradise of Bali, Kuta was no more than a small village set in coconut groves adjacent to the beach. “There was a handful of homestays with a cast of international bohemian suffers and roaming hippies as the guests,” he recounts. The two most dangerous moving objects were falling coconuts and the deer-like Balinese cow.

sovarrubias-sketchesMiguel Covarrubias Sketches: Bali – Shanghai – Adriana Williams & Bruce W Carpenter

For the next decade Carpenter led a nomadic lifestyle with regular visits to Bali. In the early 1980s, after meeting Dr. Stanley Kripper, he began organizing cultural tours under the auspices of the Institute of Noetic Sciences in Sausalito. These specialized in visits to traditional healers and religious figures and would end with a book on traditional Balinese healing co-authored with Krippner and Dr. Denny Thong the head of Bali’s mental hospital in Bangli.

In 1985 Carpenter settled in Ubud and began working on a series of research and art projects usually tied with the art, history and culture of Indonesia. As his reputation grew he was invited to author and co-author a growing number of books. In 1993 he gained wide attention as the author of Willem G. Hofker, Painter of Bali (1993), the first major book on an expatriate artist on Bali. Several other books on expatriate artists soon followed including the acclaimed, W.O.J. Nieuwenkamp, the First European Artist in Bali (1997).

“Often in life, its not what you know, but who you know,” says Carpenter. Through a serious of discussions with key figures in the hotel industry in Bali Carpenter was to be granted a wonderful opportunity after he convinced the management of the Four Seasons Resort in Jimbaran that luxury hotels were the natural heirs of the mantle once held by the royal palaces as patrons of the arts. The result was the opening of the Ganesha Gallery, the first dedicated art gallery on the premises of a hotel in 1992. This was hailed as an excellent cultural bridge between the guests and Indonesian modern and traditional art.

9789814068154-us          Emilio Ambron: An Italian Artist in Bali – Bruce W. Carpenter

Initially the resort attracted wealthy and sophisticated international clientele and with the charismatic Carpenter as the figurehead of Ganesha and his sharp eye for art, the timing was perfect and it became an immediate success.

For a 15-year period the gallery held 12 exhibitions a year, an unheard of phenomenon in Indonesian art, confirming it as the fine art gallery in Bali. In its heyday well-heeled guests and local collectors purchased quantities of art, however over the years as the profile of the guests changed, along with events such as the Gulf War, 9/11 and the Bali bombings, and its market gradually faded. This experience for Carpenter gifted him with enormous experience and knowledge, along with connections and an international reputation.

In the meanwhile Carpenter would also begin publishing a series of books on the traditional arts of Indonesia, including Mentawai Art, Batak Sculpture, Nias Sculpture and two books on traditional jewellery. “I am a firm believer that expatriates should contribute to the country they live in. I was blessed with a deep knowledge and appreciation of Indonesian arts and culture which is fast disappearing and I have taken it upon myself to try to record as much of it as possible.

4mpXadWmpPcjnmClhQXP          W.O.J Nieuwenkamp: First European Artist in Bali – Bruce W. Carpenter

In all, Carpenter has written and co-authored over twenty books and scores of articles on Indonesian art, culture and history. However, with the recent release of the book Lempad of Bali – The illuminating Line, the first fully comprehensive study on the master of Balinese traditional artist, Gusti Nyoman Lempad (1862-1978), on the 20th September 2014 at Museum Puri Lukisan, he admits, “this has by far been the most challenging project I have engaged in in my life.”

“As the book concept and project manager my list of tasks was unprecedented. I had to oversee interactions with over forty institutions and collectors in eight different countries, each with different requirements, along with dealing with six authors, one of whom is dead!” Carpenter says. “Our endeavour was to include the broadest range of Lempad’s works available in the book, therefore the detective work required was unbeknown to us and consequentially enormous.” The beautiful volume of over 424 pages is the culmination of more than six years work for the team of dedicated and respected academics and professionals.

“Bali deserves to have world class art exhibitions, books and events to create more interest in its immense and unique culture,” Carpenter states.

“I am dedicated to the publication of illustrated books on the traditional arts of Indonesia which have disappeared or are disappearing. We honor the past by recording its brilliance. I also feel it is important to urge young Indonesians to do the same. It is ironic that westerners play such a critical role in the studies of Indonesian art. This should change.”

Opinionated and articulate Carpenter counts many, including the rich and famous, as friends. A father of two he cuts both a dashing and unusual figure. His trailblazing journey through life is rich in colourful tales that are steeped in the exotic, mysterious and dynamic.

127446                                 Indonesian Tribal Art – Bruce W. Carpenter

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Imam Sucahyo’s Electrifying Outsider Art

Mimpi ke Night Klub - Imam Suchayo                              Mimpi ke Night Klub – Imam Sucahyo

 

In 1919 German psychiatrist and art historian Hans Prinzhorn (1886 – 1933) was assigned by the psychiatric hospital of the University of Heidelberg an unconventional task – to expand the hospital’s collection of art created by the mentally ill. When he left after a period of two years the collection had grown to more than 5000 artworks. The following year in 1923 Prinzhorn published his first, and destined to become highly influential book, Bildnerei der Geisteskranken (Artistry of the Mentally Ill).

Richly illustrated with wonderful, yet unorthodox artworks the book ignited the fascination of a few French avant-garde artists, while the art became the catalyst for the Art Brut Movement, founded in 1948. Nearly a century after Prinzhorn’s book was published, Art Brut, or what became known in the 1970’s as Outsider Art, has taken the art world by storm.

Tired and Need REst                                 Tired and Need Rest – Imam Sucahyo

Enthusiastically embraced by the contemporary art world a succession of art fairs, biographies, retrospectives and collections have sprung up in Europe and North America during the past decade. Now this exciting genre is beginning to receive attention here in Indonesia.

The origins of Art Brut (works that were in their raw state, uncooked by cultural and artistic influences) may be traced to Jean Dubuffet (1901-1985) who understood how works by psychiatric patients fulfilled certain Surrealist ideals, in that they seemed to flow directly from the subconscious mind. Aware of the stigma attached to ‘insane’ or ‘psychotic art’ Dubuffet required a more dignified term in order for the refined cultural circles of the time to accept a collection of works by lunatics. Along with Surrealist artist André Breton, and critic Michel Tapié, together they wrote the Art Brut Manifesto in 1947. Outsider Art, coined in 1972 as a recasting of Dubuffet’s term into the English language, is the label that has stuck ever since.

My Angry Mom - Imam Suchayo                                      My Angry Mom – Imam Sucahyo

While the definition of this style has been a constant source of debate it was generally accepted that it’s creators are not only untrained but often had little concept of a gallery or even any other forms of art other than their own. The art had no relation to developments in contemporary art at the time, yet it was the innovative and powerful expressions from a variety of individuals who existed outside recognized culture and society.

The profile of an Outsider Artist often includes a traumatic childhood, a history of institutionalization (orphanage, asylum, prison), a stunted education, subsistence jobs, yet a person with a ceaseless drive to create art. The summary is completed by a discovery story; a tale of someone with cultural connections then bringing the outsider into the art world.

Installation by Imam Suchayo               Installation at Cata Odata Art House by Imam Sucahyo

Imam Sucahyo’s life has been a series of ongoing struggles that inspire his prolific creativity. A self-taught artist born in Tuban, East Java in 1978, Imam’s first encounter with the art world was through a neighbour who was a painter. His imagination was sparked at a young age, however, when at elementary school he observed images of paintings by the Indonesian expressionist master Affandi in a library book.

Affandi’s unrestrained freedom would become a potent stimulant for Imam to explore his eccentric painting style. Intuitively he followed his own path into art making while being rejected by the local art community that favoured only conventional styles. During adolescence, with no interest in attending school and influenced by his peers Imam started to experiment with drugs and alcohol. His years of abuse led to psychosis, hallucinations and paranoia. Art became Imam’s sanctuary to calm his troubled mind.

Painting by Imam Sucahyo. Image R. Horstman                                        Artwork by Imam Sucahyo

In his early 20’s confronted with poverty and other issues, Imam had to endure sudden family tragedies. In order to cope with suffering and loss he often avoided social interaction, eventually impairing his ability to verbally communicate. Picking up odd jobs here-and-there in various cities helped sustain his life, all the while art was his foundation, a tool of reconciliation, his visual diary recording every event of his journey, both good and bad. Without it, Imam may have become lost in his self-imposed exile. One of his favourite past times was listening to the local folklore, these stories would then merge with his own experience into his art.

“Art is the most loving place, accepting of all my flaws. It accommodates my feelings wholeheartedly, and never demands or requests me to repay that which has been given to me,” Imam said. “Devotion grows so we may complete each other and I can merge as one with my art. My work is a learning place and a mirror so that my life is more meaningful. My art is my pal who securely guides me through every day.”

Art by Imam Sucahyo. Image Richard Horstman                               Artwork by Imam Sucahyo

Contemporary artists Djunaidi Kenyut grew up on the streets of Surabaya, is a long time friend of Imam’s, and he is the co-founder of Cata Odata Art House in Ubud, Bali. Kenyut has been a pillar of support during Imam’s artistic journey, and three years ago, Kenyut along with his partner have taken on the responsibility of managing Imam and introducing his work to the international art world.

The phenomenal rise of social media portals Facebook and Instagram have within in a few years enabled a new virtual art world to thrive outside of the highly competitive traditional world of galleries, museums, dealers and hardcopy print media. This has opened the door for many artists, especially here in Indonesia where the art infrastructure is lacking and many have difficulties entering the gallery system, along with finding opportunities to exhibit their work.

Art by Imam Sucahyo Image by Richard Horstman                                  Jagat Mawut at Cata Odata Art House

Through Facebook Imam’s work has gained attention from international Outsider Art audiences, attracting buyers from Indonesia, France and Australia. In 2016, his artworks were exhibited in Espace Eqart in Marciac, Outsider Art Fair in Paris, and the Outsider Art Biennale Fair in Museum Ephémères in Rives, France. Recently the Borderless Art Museum NO-MA, Japan visited Cata Odata to observe Imam’s work.

Imam’s memories and ideas come alive in Jagat Mawut (Ravaged World), a collection of over seventy paintings, installations and sculptures feature in his first solo exhibition in Indonesia. Imam’s thrilling and potent art is testament to the wonders and magnificence of creativity, highlighting the resilience of the human spirit. Open 3 October at Cata Odata, this excellent show continues until 4 November.

Art work by Imam Sucahyo - image R. Horstman                          Artwork by Imam Sucahyo

 

Jagat Mawut (Ravaged World) – Imam Sucahyo

3 October – 4 November 2017

Open Monday to Saturday 10am – 7pm

Cata Odata Art House

Opposite the Pura Dalem Temple,

Jalan Raya, Penestanan Klod, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia

Tel: +6281212126096

https://www.facebook.com/cata.odata

 

Words & Images: Richard Horstman

 

Previewing Larasati’s Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art Auction, Bali, 8 October 2017

Lot 549 Nyoman Meja "Subali & Sugriwa" 1997 Image courtesy of Larasati                               Lot 549: Subali & Sugriwa – Nyoman Meja

 

Art auctions are an exciting and accessible way to grow your collection. For the curious observer and new buyers auctions are fascinating processes that give insight into the art world that is often perceived to be opaque, mysterious, and even intimidating. Auctions allow opportunities for new buyers to enter the market often at amounts well below gallery prices and cheaper than purchasing directly from the artist’s studio.

Larasati Auctioneer’s upcoming 8 October 2017 Traditional, Modern and Contemporary Art auction to be held in Ubud, Bali offers eighty lots of fine art for sale in varying categories including Indonesian and Balinese art, and catering to the budgets of new buyers, intermediate collectors, and the connoisseurs.

Lot 532 Arifein Neif "Balinese Temple" 1992 Image courtesy of Larasati                                Lot 532: Balinese Temple – Arifein Neif

Since February 2016 real-time Internet bidding has been available through the Larasati website opening the auction to a global audience. Real-time Internet accessibility allows prospective buyers to follow along observing hammer prices to assess the situation of the market and level of interest of a certain class or individual lot, while also allowing for bidding strategies to be revised.

A feature of the twice-yearly Larrasati auction is always the fascinating array of Balinese modern traditional paintings available for sale; the genre that evolved through the influence of the Pitamaha Artist’s Association established in 1936 in Ubud to oversee the growth of this art style catering for new burgeoning markets that quickly developed during the first wave of tourism to embrace Bali.

Lot 546 Nyoman Kayun "Suasana di Desa" 2008, Image courtesy of Larasati                              Lot 546: Suasana di Desa – Nyoman Kayun

Two works of interest by masters of the Pitamaha are Lot 565, Perebutan Tirta Kamandalu by Anak Agung Gde Meregeg (1912-2000) with an estimated price between Rp.60,000,000 – 80,000,000, and Lot 575, Sang Hyang Jaran by Tjokorda Oka Gambir (1902-1975) with an estimated price between Rp.20,000,000 – Rp. 25,000,000. These paintings offer excellent buying opportunities if purchased within the undervalued estimated prices. Both artists have had enormous influence on the development of Balinese art, Gambir one of the founders of the Ubud School of painting, while Meregeg, one of the first students of Walter Spies (1895-1942) is the grandfather of the celebrated Ubud painter A.A. Anom Sukawati.

New buyers have excellent opportunities to enter the market with Lot 505, Broken Triangle, 1990 by Made Wianta, which has an estimated price between Rp.5,000,000 – 7,000,000, Lot 510, Dua Wanita Jawa, 1988 by Bagong Kussudiardjo (1928-2004) with an estimated price of between Rp.6,000,000 – 8,000,000, and Lot 511, Figur Wayang, 1990 by Pande Gde Supada which has an estimated price of between Rp. 6,000,000 – 8,000,000. Both Wianta and Supada played formative roles in the shaping Balinese modern and contemporary art in the 1970’s.

Lot 561 Dewa Ketut Rungan "Burung-Burung Surgawi" Image courtesy of Larasati                  Lot 561: Burung-burung di Surgawi – Dewa Ketut Rungan

For buyers prepared to hold works for a 10 – 20 period some good long-term investments are available here; Lot 564, Calonarang is an ink on paper work by the respected Sanur painter Ida Bagus Nyoman Rai (1915-2000) and has an estimated price between Rp.10,000,000 – 12,000,000. Lot 566, Mythological Scene is a stunning work by Dewa Nyoman Leper (1917-1984) with an estimated price between Rp.15,000,000 – 18,000,000. Nineteen-year-old Pande I Made Dwi Artha typifies the talented new generation of Batuan painters that promise an exciting future for the most loved and critically acclaimed genre of Balinese art. His dynamic and fascinating take on the culture of corruption, Lot 534, People Are My Toys has an estimated price of between Rp.7,000,000 – 9,000,000.

The connoisseur’s attention will be upon the later part of the auction, especially the final two lots by Ida Bagus Made Poleng (1915-1999). Lot 579, Kawan Rusa has an estimated price between Rp. 140,000,000 – Rp. 170,000,000, and Lot 580 Tari Baris is estimated between Rp. 150,000,000 – Rp. 200,000,000. Poleng is arguably the most talented Balinese painter of the 20th century. Lot 578, Panen Raya is a rare work by Dewa Putu Bedil (1921-1999) with an estimated price between Rp. 70,000,000 – Rp.90,000,000, and Lot 576, by Ida Bagus Made Nadera (1910-1998) Kehidupan Nelayan has an estimated price of between Rp.65,000,000 – 80,000,000.

Lot 559 Nyoman Gunarsa "Subali & Surgawi" Image courtesy of Larasati                          Lot 559: Subali & Surgawi – Nyoman Gunarsa

The recent passing of pioneering modernist Nyoman Gunarsa in early September was an enormous loss to the Balinese art world. Born in 1944 in East Bali, Gunarsa was instrumental in helping forge new paths in Balinese aesthetics with his own dynamic interpretation of the wayang figures of Classical Balinese painting. His legacy as an artist, art lecturer and art community leader – one of the icons of the island’s cultural landscape – however, will continue on through the generations of artists he has inspired. Lot 559, Subali & Sugriwa is an excellent work by Gunarsa that will attract attention and has an estimated price of between Rp.45,000,000 – 55,000,000.

Other works of note are Lot 532, by Arifein Neif, Lot 546, Suasana di Desa by Nyoman Kayun, Lots 549 & 550, by Nyoman Meja and Lot 561, Burung-Burung Surgawi by Dewa Ketut Rungan. Lot 558, by Arie Smit, Lot 574, Potret Wanita Bali by A.A Gde Sobrat and Lot 572, The Birth of Ganesha, by Gusti Ketut Kobot (1917-1999) with an estimated price between 65,000,000 – 75,000,000. Good works for mid level collectors include Lot 518, by Made Suarsa, Lot 526, by Gusti Agung Wiranata, Lot 540, by Ketut Tagen and Lot 568, by Dewa Ketut Ding.

Lot 579 Ida Bagus Made Poleng "Kawanan Rusa" Image courtesy of Larasati                           Lot 579: Kawan Rusa – Ida Bagus Made Poleng

Prospective buyers bidding over the phone, or via real-time Internet bidding who are unable to attend the previews days or auction are advised to contact Larasati and enquire about the colour reproduction accuracy of the images contained within the online catalogue to ensure that what they wish to purchase can be realistically appraised. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue description does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections, therefore condition reports of the works, outlining the paintings current state and whether it has repairs or over painting, are available upon request.

Provenance, the historical data of the works previous owner/s is also important and is provided. An information guide including before the auction, during the auction and after the auction details, including conditions of business, the bidding process, payment, storage and insurance, and shipping of the work is also available. A buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer of each lot at rate of 22% of the hammer price of the lot.

Lot 576 Ida Bagus Made Nadera "Kehidupan Nelayan" 1950 Image courtesy of Larasati                          Lot 576: Kehidupan Nelayan – Ida Bagus Made Nadera

Open to the public at the Larasati Art Space in the Tebesaya Gallery the auction starts at 2:30 pm Sunday 8 October, while viewing begins from 11am 6 Friday.

The online catalogue is available at: www.larasati.com

 

Viewing:

Friday,           6 October   11am – 7.30pm

Saturday,   7 October     11am – 7.30pm

Sunday,     8 October     11am – 1pm

Auction: Sunday 8 October, from 2:30 pm

Larasati Bali Art Space at Tebesaya Gallery

Jalan Jatayu, Banjar Tebesaya, Peliatan,

Ubud, Gianyar Bali, Indonesia

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Courtesy: Larasati Auctioneer’s

 

 

Urip – Awakening: Pande I Made Dwi Artha

IMG_8555 Bad Dream                         Bad Dream – Pande I Made Dwi Artha

 

The goal of Yayasan TiTian Bali (YTB), a visionary foundation open January 2016, is to build a new eco system for Balinese art for the 21st Century. Situated at TiTian Art Space, Jalan Bisma, Ubud, it is a venue for developing and nurturing young artists from the genres of traditional, modern and contemporary art, and also scouting for new talent. With its annual program of exhibitions, awards, workshops and book releases, YTB is a launch pad for young talented Balinese artists.

Pande I Made Dwi Artha - "Vacation on the Moon"                         Vacation on the Moon – Pande I Made Dwi Artha

Presenting its third exhibition of 2017, this year’s program highlights the exciting new generation of artists from Batuan, the most internationally recognized, and critically acclaimed genre of Balinese traditional art. YTB showcases artist Pande I Made Dwi Artha on Saturday 2nd September with an open house celebration beginning at 9am and continuing throughout the day until 5pm. Urip – Awakening features 9 acrylic works on paper by the talented young artist who was born in 1998, in his debut solo exhibition.

IMG_8565 Game Over                                 Game Over – Pande I Made Dwi Artha

Growing up within the rich family tradition of Batuan painting, from the age of nine Dwi Artha was apprenticed to his father Ketut Kenur, learning the painting philosophies and techniques that are unique to Batuan. Aged 12 he first exhibited at Ubud’s Puri Lukisan Museum, in 2015, aged 17 he captured local art observers attention when he exhibited the popular Balinese folktale about the family of Pan and Man Brayut with the imaginative verve of a young and potent creative mind.

IMG_8546 National Struggle                       Unity in Diversity, Pertahanan – Pande I Made Dwi Artha

The Brayut’s have eighteen children, each representative of the 18 syllables within the Balinese alphabet. Dwi Artha’s painting Vacation on the Moon – Keluarga Brayut ke Bulan transforms the old and symbolic tale into a wonderful modern interpretation, beautifully depicting each of the family members playfully engaged while sitting on the moon, set within a fantastic galactic backdrop.

IMG_8561 People are my toys                                People Are My Toys – Pande I Made Dwi Artha

Urip – Awakening can be divided into four distinct painting themes: Balinese folklore, Hindu religious epics, Vedic philosophies and sociopolitical satire. Unity in Diversity – Pertahanan, 2016, is the highlight of the exhibition for its perfectly balanced, symmetrical composition and harmonic colour scheme, complemented by an economy of visual elements. In this work the artist highlights the sociopolitical forces that threaten the ideals of the Indonesian national slogan: Unity in Diversity.

IMG_8538 Three Colors                                  Three Colors – Pande I Made Dwi Artha

It depicts the mythical Garuda bird with the Indonesian coat of arms emblazoned upon it chest (representing the Pancasila – the five founding principles that unite the country), being attacked from all four directions by the elements that threaten the country’s stability – radicalism, illegal drugs, corruption and terrorism.

Pande I Made Dwi Artha represents the future of Batuan painting through which the classic story-telling traditions are injected with new life, via fresh sensibilities.

IMG_8518 Journey to Nirvana                            Journey to Nirvana – Pande I Made Dwi Artha

 

Urip – Awakening: Pande I Made Dwi Artha

Open House from 9am – 5pm

Saturday 2nd September

Continuing through until 3 October 2017

TiTian Art Space

Jalan Bisma # 88, Ubud

+628113988444

www.titianartspace.com

 

Words: Richard Horstman

 

The Art of Pengosekan Village

Ketut Rudi. 2010                             Birds of Lod Tunduh, 2010  – Ketut Rudi

Balinese traditional art is the art of story telling. Its ancient narratives bring to life tales from the sacred Hindu and Buddhist texts, old Balinese and Javanese folklore, and accounts of daily life. Its purpose is to promote harmony within the community via examples of proper moral conduct.

During the past century indigenous art has been revolutionized via the meeting with Western art techniques and ideas into a ‘new’ genre that became known as Balinese modern traditional art. This art form thrived due to the development of new tourist markets, driven initially by the first wave of foreign visitors in the 1930’s, who after holidaying on Bali wished to purchase a memento to bring home. A distinctive feature of Balinese modern traditional art is the different village styles, or ‘schools’ that evolved over time, each with its own individual creative verve.

Cosmic Circle - Dewa Nyoman Batuan                                    Cosmic Circle – Dewa Nyoman Batuan

Stories from the other side of the canvas – both triumphant and tragic – of the artists and the events behind the art have enriched the ‘aura’ of Balinese modern traditional art while endearing a global audience. This is a tale about the art and some of the characters that have distinguished the art from the village of Pengosekan.

Overshadowed by the more famous styles of Ubud, Batuan and Sanur, Pengosekan, one kilometre south of Ubud, has its own art history, complete with unique figures, and signature styles. The most celebrated of all Pengosekan painters is Gusti Ketut Kobot (1917-1999), accredited as one of the leaders of the post-war changes in Balinese paintings, he was also an influential art teacher. Some of Kobot’s finest works are mythological featuring characters from the religious narratives, while he also responsible for creating the prototypes for the scenes of village life that would be ceaselessly imitated for mass production as tourist art.

Gusti Ketut Kobot, "Triwikrama" 1986, Image couresty of Larasati                                 Triwikrama, 1986  –  Gusti Ketut Kobot

Kobot’s renditions of characters that still today are brought to life in the Wayang Kulit shadow puppet theatre are executed with extraordinary attention to compositional balance. According to the Balinese paintings that achieve perfect visual equilibrium indicate the artist’s excellent skills, and his strong connection with the divine. Brahma on Wilmana, Kobot’s painting of the Hindu god of creation riding the monster headed mythical bird Wilmana, on permanent display at the Neka Art Museum in Sanggingan, Ubud is fine example of his talent.

Structured with outer layers of decorative patterns the central characters appear framed and effortlessly poised, Wilmana wears a magic protective poleng (black and white checkered cloth) around the waist to avert harmful forces, since it has positive white and negative black in balance. Kobot is renowned for such depictions, honing them to the height of refinement. He is acknowledged as one of the masters of the original Ubud artist’s cooperative, the Pita Maha that thrived between 1936-1945, helping establish Balinese modern traditional art.

Gusti Ketut Kobot."Scene from Ramayana Story" 50x70cm                         Scene from the Ramayana story  –  Gusti Ketut Kobot

The inhabitants of Pengosekan were predominantly farmers, tending the agricultural fields surrounding their village. In the process of breaking away from the orthodox subject matter that featured in their paintings, the artists began to look outside of the conventions for new creative inspiration, and started paying more attention to nature.

A signature style developed in Pengosekan during the 1960’s featuring images of local flora and fauna painted in fresh pastel colours. At first the artists focussed on depicting bird life set within beautiful scenarios of forests and trees, others then explored nature close-up, their compositions highlighting an array of insects, often grasshoppers or butterflies rendered in great detail.

Pengosekan Style                              Pengosekan fauna and flora style

One of the finest practitioners of the flora and fauna style is Ketut Rudi who was born in Lotonduh, just south of Pengosekan in 1943. His works were commissioned and collected by the second President of Indonesia, Suharto (1921-2008) and hang in the Presidential State Palaces around the country. Rudi often painted at the State Palace in Tampaksiring, Central Bali, while Suharto was on retreat from the nation’s capital city, Jakarta. To ease his mind Suharto would often sit for hours watching Rudi at work.

Another painter, Ketut Liyer (1924-2016) was a local village priest (pemangku) who painted agricultural scenes and the sacred cloth amulets known as rerajahan. Liyer, who was also a paranormal and ‘healer’, shot to international fame via the Hollywood movie Eat, Pray, Love released in 2010 and starring Julia Roberts. Liyer’s paintings occasionally come up for auction at the twice-yearly Larasati Bali art sales held in Ubud.

Dewa Put Mokoh, 2006, Acrylic on canvas 60x90cm.                                      Dewa Putu Mokoh, 2006

Dewa Nyoman Batuan (1939-2013) was an icon within the world of Balinese art. Painter, entrepreneur and artist community visionary, he was graced with an effervescent personality. Batuan had a dream for his village that manifested into the Pengosekan Community of Artists in 1970.  Through his entrepreneurial endeavor he helped establish international markets for the local paintings and was able to contribute enormously for the well-being of the community of poor farmers, many who became painters to supplement their family income. Batuan’s contribution to the development of Balinese modern traditional art was to fuse traditional narratives within the Buddhist structural icon of the mandala, designing compelling, unique, and highly original works.

His older brother, Dewa Putu Mokoh (1934-2010) broke free from the restraints of Balinese art to introduce personal and intimate visual stories of another side of life that was often quirky, lurid, and even taboo. Simplified forms dominated his compositions, a self trained artist, Mokoh’s works boarded on both the modern and contemporary, simplifying and extending the range of images in Balinese art, especially with his close-up focus on intimate scenes.

I GAK MURNIASIH - SEMBAHYANG 104 - AOC - 170 x 100 cm - 2004                                   Gusti Ayu Kadek Murniasih

Pengosekan became the adopted home for the most important woman artist in Indonesian art history, Gusti Ayu Kadek Murniasih (1966-2006). Murni came from Tabanan, Central Bali to study with Mokoh. She rose from the life as a child of a farmer, poor and uneducated to the ranks of artistic distinction. Her father sexually abused her at the age of nine. Murni’s minimalist figurative/surrealistic style featured powerful coloration while communicating via the language of the sub conscious. Her outsider art is confrontational, daring and even violent, yet always electrifying. Murni’s work broke significant grounds into the social taboos of gender politics and feminism.

 

Words & Images: Richard Horstman