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Previewing Larasati’s Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art Auction, Bali, August 2018

dewa putu mokoh "iringan pengantin" image courtesy of larasati                     “Iringan Pengantin” – Dewa Putu Mokoh 

 

Each year Larasati Auctioneer’s, Indonesia’s oldest fine art auction house, present two auctions in Ubud highlighting Balinese traditional art. Upcoming Sunday 26 August is seventy-four items for sale in the Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art Auction. Open to the public, viewing begins 11am Friday 24 August at the Larasati Art Space at Tebesaya Gallery, Ubud, Bali.

The sale is led by a collection of Mr & Mrs Charles Powell, USA, and three beautiful traditional paintings by Wayan Radjin from the 1970’s. The sale presents works by old masters of traditional genres, some unique and rare paintings, works with investment potential, and an array of compositions that allow good entry opportunities into the market for new collectors.

wayan radjin "ramayana membebaskan dewi sita" image courtesy of larasati               “Ramayana Membebaskan Dewi Sita”- Wayan Radjin

 

Catering for a range of tastes works on offer include ink, and watercolour on paper, Indonesian modern art, Balinese modern and contemporary paintings and works in traditional styles, along with a wood carving. Distinguished Balinese artists featured are Ida Bagus Made Poleng, Ida Bagus Made Widja, Gusti Ketut Kobot and Nyoman Gunarsa. For new buyers wishing to enter the market, estimated prices in this sale begin at IDR 500,000 (USD $35). Auctions offer buying opportunities at prices much cheaper than purchasing works directly from the artist studio, or galleries.

These works by respected old masters will be of interest to the connoisseurs of Balinese art. Tjokorda Oka Gambir (1902-1975) is one of the founders of the Ubud School of Painting, lot# 549 Mythological Scene in Kamasan Style is a large 248 x 132cm work in natural colour on cloth with an estimated price of between IDR 65 – 80 million, while lot #550 Garuda & Wisnu is by one of the esteemed masters of the influential Pitamaha Artists Association from Ubud (1936-1945), Gusti Ketut Kobot (1917-1999) with an estimated price of between IDR 95 – 110 million.

dewa ketut rungun "burung burung bangau" image courtesy of larasati                   “Burung – Burung Bangau” – Dewa Ketut Rungun

 

Lot #574 Taris Bali is a superbly balanced composition of traditionally attired Balinese warrior emerging from the forest performing the unique warrior dance by Ida Bagus Made Poleng (1915 – 1999) who is regarded as one of the finest Balinese painters of the past century. This work bears the stamped identification that guarantees authenticity from the Ida Bagus Made Foundation, and has an estimated price of between IDR 165 – 190 million.

The following are rare pieces lot #544, Sarasvati is an early work by the respected Batuan painter Wayan Taweng (1922 – 2004) who trained under Nyoman Ngendon (1906 – 1946) with an estimated price of between IDR 10 – 15,000,000 million. Wayan Radjin (b.1945) is the son of the celebrated Batuan artist I Djata, considered the founding father of the Batuan School. Lot #527 Ramayana Membebaskan Dewi Sita by Radjin is a beautiful acrylic on canvas composition with an estimated price of between IDR 28 – 38 million. Most of Radjin’s works are on paper, and rarely does such a quality work come onto the market.

gusti ketut kobot "garuda wisnu" image courtesy of larasati                          “Garuda Wisnu” – Gusti Ketut Kobot

 

Lot # 572 Iringan Pengatin is a unique work because it is a crowded composition by the renowned painter of the unconventional, Dewa Putu Mokoh (1913 – 2010), and has an estimated price of between IDR 7 – 10 million, while lot #521 Ibu dan Anak, featuring a composition of a mother and child is too an unusual work by Dewa Ketut Rungun (1922-1986), who is noted for his bird compositions. It has an estimated price of between IDR 15 – 20 million.

Opportunities for good investments are lot #513 a. Di Malam Ini and b. Aku dan Dia Bermain, two paintings by Indonesia’s most important woman artist I Gusti Ayu Kadek Murniashi (1966 – 2006), with a combined estimated price of between IDR 18 – 25 million, and lot #520 Bali Life by Ketut Gelgel, which has an estimated price of between IDR 95 – 110 million.

i gusti ayu kadek murniashi "di malam ini" image courtesy of larasati                  “Di Malam Ini” – I Gusti Ayu Kadek Murniashi (Murni)

 

New collectors have opportunities to enter the market with lot #507 Hierarkie by Susilo Budi Purwanto, Berburu Kuda, lot# 512 by Made Wiradana, and two abstract oil paintings, lot #540 Kampung Nelayan Kusamba and lot #541 Gunungan Semar by noted Javanese painter Bagong Kussudiardjo (1928-2004), and the beautiful flowing flora and fauna forms within Burung Burung Bangau, lot #573 by Dewa Ketut Rungun. Emerging Balinese artist Ngakan Putu Agus Arta Wijaya is a young artist worth keeping an eye on, with excellent technical skills, good ideas and a distinctive style, lot# 508 Upgrade comes with an estimated price of between IDR 7.5 – 9 million.

Other popular artists within the sale are renowned Dutch colourist Arie Smit, Otto Djaja, Mochtar Apin, Jehan, Ida Bagus Nyoman Rai, Nyoman Dewa Jati, Dewa Putu Bedil and Agung Mangu Putra.

For buyers seeking to invest it is important to have a strategy, with the view of buying and holding for at least 10-15 years, and to invest early in an artist before everyone is getting on to the market. Look for works that are rare and unique – uniqueness referring to the quality and how often the artist makes such image or composition. A painting’s provenance is important for the established taste and also for authenticity, with the more prominent the previous owners, the better. This also includes the works history of exhibitions and inclusion in books or catalogues.

ida bagus made poleng "taris bali" image courtesy of larasati                           “Taris Bali” – Ida Bagus Made Poleng

 

Potential buyers bidding over the phone, or via real-time Internet bidding who are unable to attend the previews days or auction are advised to contact Larasati and enquire about the colour reproduction accuracy of the images contained within the online catalogue to ensure that what they wish to purchase can be realistically appraised. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue description does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections, therefore condition reports of the works, outlining the paintings current state and whether it has repairs or over painting, are available upon request.

Provenance, the historical data of the works previous owner/s is also important and is provided. An information guide including before the auction, during the auction and after the auction details, including conditions of business, the bidding process, payment, storage and insurance, and shipping of the work is also available. A buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer of each lot at rate of 22% of the hammer price of the lot.

The online catalogue, complete with a guide for prospective buyers is available at: www.larasati.com

Larasati Bali Art Space at Tebesaya Gallery

Jalan Jatayu, Banjar Tebesaya, Peliatan,

Ubud, Gianyar Bali, Indonesia

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Courtesy: Larasati

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Smart’s cutting parade of choreography

Chout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) @ Tony Raka Art Gallery - Image Courtesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn PrittChout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) at Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud – Image Courtesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn Pritt

 

Australian contemporary artist Sally Smart has a long and enduring bond with Indonesia, having first exhibited in 2005 at the Jogja Biennale. “I have a special fascination in the shadow theatre, and have had a collection of Wayang Kulit puppets for many years. This has inspired my interest in the representation of the shadow world and its story telling dimension, across cultures,” Smart said.

“I visit Yogyakarta regularly where I have formed relationships with artists and artisans who I continue to collaborate with and engage in immersive dialogue and practice, examining cultural history and the commonalities in the post-colonial world discourse.”

 

P.A.R.A.D.E - Sally Smart @ BIASA - Image Richard Horstman                         P.A.R.A.D.E – Sally Smart at BIASA, Kerobokan

 

In 2012, as the Sackler fellow at the University of Connecticut, USA Smart worked with their School of Puppetry and animation, learning shadow puppet techniques and creating a series of works that also included moving image. Her puppet creations are a fusion of Eastern and Western cultures, the artist also being inspired by the seminal European avant-garde artists of the Dada movement, along with the Constructivism philosophies. She positions early 20th century experimental choreography, costume and theatre design alongside traditional Indonesian shadow puppet performance.

The ‘immediacy and simplicity’ of collage as a potent contemporary art practice is often overlooked. Cutting out and re-assembling, taking from one source to compliment another is a disruptive, yet highly creative method with limitless potentialities. For Smart it is the foundation of the communication of her artistic ideas. “The cut out methodology has been a strong part of my practice since the early nineties – the expression of a cut out – aligns silhouette and the shadow play conceptually and technically,” she said.

Puppets (The Choreography of Cutting) - Sally Smart @ Tony Raka Art Gallery - Images coutesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn PrittPuppets (The Choreography of Cutting) – Sally Smart at the Tony Raka Art Gallery – Images coutesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn Pritt

 

Honold Fine Art (HFA) presents in parallel solo exhibitions Sally Smart’s most recent offerings held in two different venues in Bali, Indonesia. From 19 June The Choreography of Cutting opened at the Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud, and P.A.R.A.D.E. at BIASA in Kerobokan. Her work ‘speaks’ about the human body as a vehicle of expression through movement, performance and gesture, revealing collective and individual anxieties, while questioning the status quo.

At a glance both shows appear worlds apart, yet they are innately connected, P.A.R.A.D.E. being the perfect synthesis of Smart’s two works exhibited in Ubud. Displayed at Tony Raka is Chout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) 2018, an enormous 350 x 900cm wall hanging assemblage in which abstract organic forms and imaginary landscapes come alive upon Smart’s colourful textile curtain that includes dye transfer photographic prints on satin and chiffon, with multiple collage elements. And, Puppets (The Choreography of Cutting) 2016-18 a mixed-media installation of over 30 abstract suspended puppets, with moveable parts and of varying dimensions.

P.A.R.A.D.E - Sally Smart @ BIASA Image Courtesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn PrittP.A.R.A.D.E – Sally Smart at BIASA  – Image Courtesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn Pritt

 

P.A.R.A.D.E is inspired by Smart’s encounter with the immense stage curtain painted by Pablo Picasso for the Ballet Parade in 1917 on display in Rome in 2017. In Smart’s P.A.R.A.D.E which features Parade (In Being Dancing), 2018, Staging the Studio (Blaubart &Pina), 2017-18, and Drama (Staging the Studio), 2018, all floor to ceiling curtains with photographic dye transfers on textile with collage elements, a troupe of figures are represented on transparent textiles intersecting and overlapping to create multiple images of performance.

While Chout Ballet Curtain is predominated by strong colors and dense ‘heavy’ fabrics, the illusory impact emphasizes the laws of gravity grounding the observer to the floor. P.A.R.A.D.E, on-the-other-hand, has the opposite impact. It’s multiple see-through films are soft and delicate, soothing upon the eye. While its transparent qualities with layered figures appear sensual – a most potent allure. Air conditioning choreographs gentle rhythmic waves of motion across the curtain’s surfaces that are seemingly engaged within a dance of their own, and we become captivated in the dynamic interplay of Smart’s layered translucent ‘performers’. Our vision is then drawn upwards allowing us to feel elevated and expansive. The beauty and simplicity of the material is seductive – our experience is potent and ethereal.

Puppets (The Choreography of Cutting) - Sally Smart @ Tony Raka Art Gallery - Image is coutesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn PrittPuppets (The Choreography of Cutting) – Sally Smart at Tony Raka Art Gallery – Image coutesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn Pritt

 

One of Australia’s leading contemporary artists, Smart is the recipient of numerous awards and prizes. She is currently the Vice-Chancellor’s Professorial Fellow at University of Melbourne, and a board member of the National Association for the Visual Arts. She is represented in significant international public and private art collections. Recognized internationally for her large scale cut-out assemblage installations and, increasingly, performance, Smart’s artistic practice engages identity politics and the complex relationships between the body, thought and culture.

The most delightful aspects of Smart’s work are the opportunities for audience interaction, and personal art experiences. Her installations invite the observer to venture closer, to wander within and take part in a make believe other world. In response some people become animated in their own intimate performance, which has the potential to touch them deeply, while being coded into their memories.

Detail of Chout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) - Sally Smart - Image Richard Horstman   Detail of Chout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) – Sally Smart

 

“I am interested to observe the audience physically engage with my work,” the artist said. “As performance and movement are imbedded conceptually in the works, the feeling of movement and dance within the space becomes manifest, with the puppets and the curtains – making it feel dynamic and engaging. I was excited to see this.”

When asked if she believes that as artists seek out new avenues to create more positive opportunities for fresh and personal audience art experiences that society will gain greater benefits through contemporary art? Smart responded, “Yes, always when something is triggered, even the slightest gesture, to reveal and present possibilities for news ways of thinking an engagement in all aspects of society. Art makes essential pathways.”

20180620_155042_IMG_4240                           Detail of P.A.R.A.D.E – Sally Smart at BIASA 

 

 

The Choreography of Cutting

at Tony Raka Art Gallery,

Jalan Raya Mas 86, Mas, Ubud

& P.A.R.A.D.E. at BIASA,

Jalan Raya Kerobokan 51 X, Kerobokan

Open from 17 June – 17 July 2018

www.sallysmart.com

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Courtesy of Honold Fine Art with Evelyn Pritt & Richard Horstman

Welcome to Denpasar2018 Art+Design: An Exhibition & Movement

Invited artist Yoka Sara                        Denpasar2018 – invited artist Yoka Sara

 

During the month of October a unique program of activities presented by CushCush Gallery (CCG) in Denpasar highlights the ongoing transformation of the city into a modern creative hub that is evolving side-by-side with its cultural and historical icons. Opening 5 October DenPasar2018 Art+Design – An Exhibition & Movement headlines the program along with other community happenings, including Design Talk, Design Walk, Open Studios, that coincide with the launch of the DenPasar Art+Design Map 2018/2019.

 “In recent years many creatives from throughout Indonesia and overseas have been attracted to Bali for its lifestyle and rich culture. Many decide to base themselves here, while others return regularly. As the island’s multi-cultural society evolves so does its creative potential,” said CCG co-founder Suriawati Qiu, who along with her partner Jindee Chua in July 2016 launched CCG upon the local art and design landscape injecting exciting energy into Bali’s creative scene.

Curatorial Talk #1 with Kevin & Marishka 6 10 2018   Curatorial Talk #1 with Kevin & Marishka 6th October at CushCush Gallery

 

“Nowadays many of Bali’s youths have been educated in universities outside Bali and internationally, and then return. They are important agents of change and vital contributors to Bali’s artistic spirit and are stakeholders in the new emerging creative economy.”

The development of Bali’s contemporary art and design infrastructure (including new art spaces, co-working creative hubs, festivals, and organizations) are the important meeting and showcasing points for the thriving new generation of creatives. Following on from the first edition released in 2017 the DenPasar Art+Design Map 2018/2019 will include a listing of community events celebrating Art & Design in October.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA               Design Talk – Denpasar Inside : Out at Maya Sanur Ballroom

 

The DenPasar Art+Design Map 2018/2019 highlights museums, government and cultural institutions, art and design educational institutions, art galleries and creative spaces, art and creative communities, festivals, artists’ studios, cultural heritage/public spaces/monuments, and the markets within the city of Denpasar.  The map is endorsed by the Denpasar Central Government (Pemerintah Kota Denpasar), Indonesian Hotel and Restaurant Association and the Denpasar Tourism Promotion Board, along with the Indonesian Government’s Agency for Creative Economy, Badan KREATIF Denpasar. Printed in 10,000 copies the map will be distributed at selected Creative spaces and hotels in Bali over the next twelve months. The unique feature of this year’s map is the QR Code to allow direct access to the listed venues via the smart phone App.

“The recent importance given to the creative economy, and its support through government organizations such as Bekraf encourages initiatives in the Creative sectors of economy,” Suria added. “The government plays an important role too.”

Invited artist Alit Ambara                         Denpasar2018 – invited artist Alit Ambara

 

Three invited artists along with 12 Shortlisted Open Call artists will exhibit in DenPasar2018 – An Exhibition and Movement. Themed “Jingga”, which describes the colour of twilight and is a metaphor of how the people of Denpasar feel about both the joys and hardships living in Denpasar. The theme endeavours to capture varying perspectives within Bali’s multi-layered realities in a three-month long exhibition showcasing works of fine artists, designers, architects and performers. Works featured include paintings, installations, multimedia projections, photography, ceramic art, and posters.

Co-curated by Suriawati and Jindee, and independent curator Stella Katherine, the invited artists include Sydney-based painter and performer Jumaadi (b. 1973, Sidoarjo, East Java), who has collaborated with Balinese traditional Kamasan painters, designer and activist Alit Ambara (b. 1970, Singaraja, Bali), exhibiting his poster designs and artefacts used in social movements, and renowned artist and architect Yoka Sara (b. 1965, Denpasar, Bali), who founded and leads SPRITES ART & CREATIVE BIENNALE (est. 2013).

Layung #2 zatkimia 17 10 2018            Layung #2 zatkimia at CushCush Gallery 17th October

 

DesignTalk invites distinguished practitioners and scholars of architecture and design disciplines, including Budiman Hendropurnomo of DCM Indonesia, Maximilian Jencquel of Studio Jencquel, a lecturer and researcher from Warmadewa University Gede Maha Putra, and Japa Wibisana and Magat Kurniawan as representatives of the Indonesian Young Architects community, to share their specialized perspectives on the evolution and transformation of Bali’s architecture. DesignTalk is hosted by Suzy Annetta, the Editor-in-Chief of Design Anthology Magazine and is themed “Bali Inside:Out”.

DenPasar2018 Art+Design is a collective effort to mark the city with its own distinct character as a hub for contemporary arts, design and culture. With CCG’s DenPasar program we aspire to put Denpasar city in the mapping of contemporary Art + Design in Bali and beyond by showcasing the potential in Denpasar and inviting Art + Design lovers to come explore,” Suria stated.

Denpasar2018 Mural Jamming with Kuncir and students of ISI Denpasar on the walls of the Kerobokan prison 30 10 2018Mural Jamming on the walls of the Kerobokan Prison with Kuncir and art students from ISI Denpasar 30th October

 

This combination of an exciting mix of people who are presently in Bali, and the many active platforms give a rise to exciting collaborations and events, to be shared amongst local communities. This visionary initiative helps to lay the foundation for increasing art/cultural/design tourism into the island’s capital and developing the local creative economy.

Located near the heart of the city, CCG is in Gang Rajawali, off Jalan Teuku Umar. An alternative gallery, with an inspiring and unique program embracing interactions and multidisciplinary creativity via explorations at the intersections of art, design, materiality, techniques and crafts, CCG prioritizes community engagement and learning, along with children’s workshops. Open to the public CCG is a must see in Denpasar.

Invited artist Jumaadi

                          Denpasar2018 – invited artist Jumaadi

 

Gotong Royong Seni with Mella Jaarsma 10 11 2018gotong royong seni with Mella Jaarsma 10th November at CushCush Gallery

 

Denpasar2018 Ceramic Painting Workshop 20 10 2018               Ceramics painting Workshop at CushCush Gallery 20th October

 

 

 

DenPasar2018 Exhibition continues until 5 January 2019

Monday—Friday: 9:00AM–5:00PM
Saturday: 9:00AM–12:00PM

CushCush Gallery (CCG)

Jl. Teuku Umar Gg. Rajawali No.1A Denpasar, Bali

Tel. (62) 361 484558

http://www.cushcushgallery.com

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: Denpasar2018 & CushCush Gallery

 

 

Balinese contemporary artist Budi Agung Kuswara: putting arts real values into perspective

21231555_207954026407213_6957891409753761884_nArtist Budi Agung Kuswara (lower, left of center) with staff, friends and patients of Rumah Berdaya

 

Art plays distinctive and irreplaceable roles within the development of a healthy society. Art offers us opportunities to be inspired, become more educated and aware, as well as to observe the thoughts and feelings of our fellow-man. The best contemporary art is essential to our well-being, having something important to say about the era we live in. Due to the onslaught of globalization, however, the financial values of art are becoming increasingly prized, over the real, functional values of art.

Balinese artist Budi Agung Kuswara represents the vanguard of emerging contemporary artists in Bali today who are reshaping the genre. What is significant about this artist, however, is his passion for how art can transform and bring greater meaning to individual lives, while building resilient communities.

26903979_1656075377748886_2074571056155799779_nVisitors at the gallery of Rumah Berdaya looking at art work by “Skizofriends Art Movement”

 

‘Kabul’, as he prefers to be known, was born in Sanur in 1982. From the age of twelve he worked beachside selling souvenirs to tourists, and he learned to surf the pristine waves that race along the coast’s outer reefs. Surfing inspired his deep connection with the forces of nature that influence his physical and non-physical worlds. His father was born in Klungkung, East Bali, the Classical art epicentre of the island. He was raised into the custom of Kamasan painting, the living tradition of story telling art used to decorate the island’s temples and the houses of the aristocracy, and serving to convey peace and harmony within Balinese society.

As a child painting was a readily accessible mode of expression, nurturing and playful, a medium through which Kabul could later explore his feelings, and ideas about identity and life. “My perspective was different to the traditional cultural identity and I came to understand that I didn’t fit in with the mainstream,” Kabul said. “So I learned to follow my own path.”

Anonymous-Ancestors    Anonymous Ancestors – art work by Budi Agung Kuswara for 2018 UWRF

 

The path of an outsider is one of duality – of freedom, yet of isolation as well. Kabul’s solitary experiences eventually led to feelings of lack of confidence; at times he felt depressed. His love of art became an increasingly vital activity – a guiding creative force. Motivated by the desire to share and inspire positive change Kabul wished to capitalize upon what had manifested during his personal struggles while he was a youth – his knowledge of art as a practical tool for self-transformation.

“I am inspired by the intervention of art into the public sphere and how it can become increasingly meaningful by responding to problems and needs of society,” Kabul said. “Through my own psychosomatic experiences I understand art is a potent medium for healing and self-empowerment.”

IMG_4668Art making at Rumah Berdaya – Budi Agung Kuswara with “Skizofriends Art Movement”

 

Kabul became aware of a community rehabilitation initiative established in 2015 by Rai Putra Wiguna, a psychiatrist at the Denpasar Regional Hospital, along with some of his patients. In response Kabul went on to create the Skizofriends Art Movement” in 2016, a group that focuses on both art therapy, and life-skills training programs for local men and women with schizophrenia. “I am committed to eliminating the stigma attached to people suffering from mental illness, while promoting their inclusion in society,” he said.

Following on from the success of Kabul and his colleague’s lobbying of the Denpasar Government Skizofriends Art Movement” in 2017 became a part of the Denpasar City Health Department Care Program, and is still ongoing. “By introducing a simple, sustainable model of how an organized art program can beneficially function for people, we immediately gained the government’s support,” Kabul said. The group was then offered an abandoned building in Jalan Hayam Waruk (next door to the Bali Bakery in Renon) that became “Rumah Berdaya”.

35151724_10216609420728479_6691008827497644032_o           “Skizofriends Art Movement” with artworks at Rumah Berdaya

 

Meaning house of empowerment, “Rumah Berdaya” began as a meeting place for people with schizophrenia, so they could learn new skills, interact and express themselves. Its focus is to create opportunities for the patients to constructively engage with the public, while helping them to regain their status as useful and productive members of society.

From 2002 Kabul spent thirteen years living in Yogyakarta, studying fine art at the prestigious Indonesian Art Institute (ISI), here his work became more politically and socially driven. Charmed by Orientalism and how exotic images led to supposed attitudes and ideas of Bali by westerners, in 2013 Kabul started using an old printing technique to experiment with, and explore his ideas about cultural identity, while creating new inroads in Balinese contemporary art.

Golden-Farmer                            Golden Farmer – Budi Agung Kuswara

 

With his life partner, Singaporean artist Mintio, they are the creative force behind Ketemu Project, in Batubulan. A visual art collective and social enterprise hybrid with a focus on social and international engagement, Ketemu burst onto the scene in 2015 during a critical period in the development of contemporary art infrastructure in Bali, injecting important fresh energy into the Bali art world.

Look out for Kabul’s art “Anonymous Ancestors”, on exhibition, and featured on all promotional media, in the upcoming 2018 UWRF, 24-28 October.

http://www.budiagungkuswara.com

 

Words: Richard Hostman

Images coutesy: Budi Agung Kuswara & Skizofriends Art Movement

 

 

 

 

 

Afghan artist’s “Iron Cocoon” a highlight of Jogja Art Weeks

"IRON COCOON" Amin Taasha - Image Richard HorstmanExhibition view – Iron Cocoon – Amin Taasha, 22 May – 7 June, Galeri Fadar Sidik,  ISI Yogyakarta

 

Indonesian and international art audiences visiting Yogyakarta during Jogja Art Weeks (JAW), a month long program of art events held throughout the Central Java, have a unique opportunity to observe a new direction in Asian contemporary art.

Iron Cocoon, the second solo exhibition by emerging Afghanistan artist Amin Taasha, open 22 May, Galeri Fadjar Sidik at ISI Yogyakarta, features a collection of ‘Abstract-Miniaturism’ paintings, presented together with audio compositions by Serbian composer Vanja Dabic, text, video and installation art, that may be observed individually, or as a whole.

Thoughtful SoulThoughtful Soul, 2018  – Amin Taasha. Watercolour, acrylic, ink, gold and sliver on paper 45 x 120cm

 

His compositions are a unique fusion of Asian cultural influences along with contemporary art ideas, featuring ancient script from Persia, Buddhist iconography, figures drawn from the 7th – 11th century miniature painting style of Afghanistan, along with Chinese ink modified calligraphy. Born in 1995 in Bamiyan Province in the mountainous central region of Afghanistan, Taasha draws upon a wealth of traditional art, where elements of Greek and Buddhist art were merged into a distinctive classical style known as Greco-Buddhist art, and then transforms this through the use of abstraction.

The decapitated Buddha is an ongoing theme throughout Iron Cocoon through which Taasha makes reference to the Taliban’s destruction of giant Buddhist statues found in his homeland. But while Forbidden, just one of nine of his larger vertical and horizontal monochrome scenarios makes direct reference to the violence committed by the Taliban, it is his central, and culminating installation, Witness that delivers the graphic evidence, and impact of the events that shocked the world in 2001.

"Witness" Amin Taasha - Image Richard Horstman                       Witness – Amin Taasha  Video installation

 

A circular line of earth becomes the frame for a short video documentary that reveals Taliban tanks and rockets firing at the giant Buddhist icons, while cultural experts lament the demise. A seated Buddha statue grounds the installation, ironically a headless observer, while suspended floating above, its decapitated head is taken away by a black crow inflight. Iron Cocoon is rich in symbolic metaphors, and the crow throughout the exhibition represents the powerful ignorant few that destroy important history and culture.

Within Taasha’s painting his mastery comes alive through his language of aesthetic simplicity. He balances the visual worlds of colour and form into perfect unions of the abstract, along with the recognizable form. He communicates on both the conscious and subconscious levels, through his Zen code of symbolic metaphors. His tiny figures at once connect us with the past while conveying wisdoms from an ancient time. Animals too play important roles.

"Untitled #10" Amin Taasha - Photo Richard Horstman Untitled #7 – Amin Taasha. Mixed media, gold ans silver on old book paper 13 x 19cm

 

Black is the predominant visual feature. It’s enigmatic potency functions on the subconscious level, creating a metaphysical realm with which to engage the audience. This blackness conjures up what the Buddhists refer to as the void – a place of commanding inner peace. Fine splashes of ink appear like smoke, and represent the eternal cycle of life. Gold and silver leaf are another important aesthetic feature, along with a measured array of dynamic colours, they function as powerful aesthetic tools.

Taasha moved to Kabul when the Taliban took over the area and began studying art in 2007, then in 2010 he attended the Kabul Fine Arts Institute where he has studied painting, miniature painting and calligraphy. In 2012 he was invited to participate in a workshop Seeking Study at the National Gallery of Afghanistan, as a part of the Documenta 13 international art project in Kabul. Two of his works were deemed to contain controversial subject matter and were prohibited from the exhibition by the Afghan Ministry of Information and Culture. Taasha was later subjected to police interrogation with the barrel of an AK-44 pushed to his head.

When The Sun Goes DownWhen the sun goes down – Amin Taasha. Watercolour, acrylic, ink, gold & sliver on paper, 45 x 120 cm

 

In 2013 Taasha moved to Central Java, receiving a one-year scholarship to study art at ISI Yogyakarta, the following year he was awarded a one-year scholarship at UNNES Semarang, and in 2014 received another scholarship at ISI, where he has been studying ever since. He has been exhibiting consistently for the past ten years in Afghanistan and Indonesia, as well as in Iran, Bangladesh, Lebanon, Indonesia, US, Canada, Germany and Italy. His works are in collections in the UK, US, Canada, Netherlands, Germany, France, India, Australia, Singapore and Indonesia. Iron Cocoon is his first solo exhibition in Indonesia.

The Iron Cocoon catalogue states, the concept of Taasha’s exhibition takes the metaphor of an armoured cocoon; a flexible protected shell that allows the person within to be able to transform, safe from the conflicts occurring outside. This is partially in reference to Taasha growing up in Afghanistan, a country synonymous with death and violence, and how art is able to first germinate in this environment, before being transposed to another country, where it can begin to grow in its new style.

A naudience members engages in Taasha's work while litening to the audio composition by Vanja DabicAn audience member engages with a painting while listening to an audio composition by Vanja Dabic.

 

Taasha, who exhibited in The Death of Contemporary Art, a group exhibition along side leading Indonesian artist Heri Dono in 2016 in Yogyakarta, is a part of a group of post-contemporary artists. Iron Cocoon follows on from his two sold-out exhibitions in Bangladesh and Iran this year. Taasha’s sensitivity connects with the deepest levels of our psyche, touching the soul. Works of extraordinary precision – beautiful and serene – Iron Cocoon reflects maturity that belies the artist’s years.

Amin Taasha - Image Richard Horstman                                        Amin Taasha

 

Forbidden Forbidden – Amin Taasha. Watercolour, acrylic, ink, gold & silver on paper. 45 x 120 cm

 

 

Iron Cocoon

Open daily 22 May – 7 June,

Galeri Fadar Sidik,

ISI Yogyakarta

Jalan Parangritis, Sewon, Bantul Yogyakarta

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Courtesy Amin Taasha & Richard Horstman

Paradise lost & new frontiers: Gede Mahendra Yasa’s landmark investigation into Balinese painting

"Tamiang" GMY 2011Tamiang, 2011, 150 x 200cm – Gede Mahendra Yasa. Exhibited in “Post Bali”

 

After the fall of President Suharto and the New Order Regime in 1998 Indonesian artists enjoyed new liberties, and their art became increasingly social and political in content. Representing a new generation of the Balinese avant-garde, Gede Mahendra Yasa was inspired by the freedoms of the post refromasi era, and dared to investigate his Balinese roots like no other artist had previously attempted – he questioned the popular ‘narratives’, along with the status quo. What transpired at the beginning of the new millenium has evolved into an ongoing project – a unique, yet essential, exploration into Balinese painting.

Born in 1967 in the island’s former capital of Singaraja, Mahendra Yasa grew up within a ‘multi-cultural’ environment where the Balinese Hindu’s had the freedom to choose a more open interpretation of cultural life. They were not subjected to the religious and cultural structures that were ‘imposed’ within the Gianyar regency during the 20th century, while it was being honed into a pro-Dutch colonial model of a ‘living cultural museum’ to stimulate tourism.

"Priest" GMY 2011Priest, 2011, 150 x 200cm – Gede Mahendra Yasa. Exhibited in “Post Bali”

 

Mahendra Yasa studied architecture and mechanical engineering in Surabaya, East Java from 1986 to 1988, yet he discovered this to be too limiting, being more attracted to the expressive freedoms of painting. He then began his autodidact journey, and an intensive learning into the history and discourses of Western painting.  Between 1998-2002 he formally studied at the Indonesian Art Institute (ISI) Denpasar where he analyzed his practical and theoretical Balinese art knowledge.

Bali is generally considered to be exotic, and is stuck in a past cultural era. Balinese art is perceived as secondary, as a craft, and not as a legitimate part of Indonesian modern art history. These issues have arisen due to the dense bias of ethnography and anthropology (orientalist in nature) in determining the understanding of Bali, especially during 1920’s – 1930’s within the ‘golden age’ of Balinese development when Balinese traditional art was shaped as a colonial political tool – and this frustrates Mahendra Yasa.  An atheist, Mahendra Yasa was an avid detractor of the local culture, and took a critical stance to the art practices in Bali. This compelled him to continuously investigate and then seek out new frontiers in Balinese painting, in a career long pursuit into its thematic and aesthetic distinctions.

7 Magnficent Masterpieces #1, 2011, 200x150cm Newspaper Collage chinese ink on canvas7 Magnificent Masterpieces #1, 2011, 200 x 150cm, Newspaper Collage & Chinese Ink on Canvas – Gede Mahendra Yasa. Exhibited in “Post Bali”

 

“My entry point is from the contemporary, but using the traditional identity of painting,” he once said. In Post Bali, his landmark 2014 exhibition at ROH Projects, Jakarta, Mahendra Yasa adopted a unique methodology to other Indonesian contemporary artists, driven by his powerful intellect, and an obsession with painting, he delved into local Balinese issues from a western conceptual art perspective. Painting for the artist is not only about the object – it can function as a philosophical and analytical tool.

Post Bali combined an array of western and Balinese painting styles through which Mahendra Yasa revealed his investigation of the complexities of Balinese painting. He utilized various appropriations in his works that have been internationally recognized as modern or contemporary art masterpieces. The exhibition unfolded with photo-realism paintings from 2010 depicting scenarios of Balinese life. It continued via the acclaimed traditional Batuan narrative style of painting, with miniature photo realistic characters as the code through which he explained key parts of Balinese, Indonesian and Western art techniques and history. Within these works he also explored traditional techniques of making canvases, and Chinese ink painting.

7 Magnificent Masterpieces #2, 2012 Acrylic on canvas 200x150cm7 Magnificent Masterpieces #2, 2012, 200x150cm, Acrylic on Canvas – Gede Mahendra Yasa. Exhibited in “Post Bali”

 

Contemporary Art in Paradise Lost, Mahendra Yasa’s enormous 75 x 300 cm epic which included multiple scenes in the one work, taking the artist over a year to complete, was juxtaposed against his dual panel Pollock-esque abstract expressionist works. Post Bali explored three distinct realizations of Bali through different painting styles and ‘tests’ to what extent it is able to interact with materials and ideas familiar to contemporary art. The exhibition can be read as a chronological progression of his work and represents the start of a project that has now become much larger and more complex in nature. Post Bali has defined Mahendra Yasa as one of the few, truly important Balinese contemporary artists, while confirming his position within Indonesian art history.

"Silver Acrylic Paint on Face #2" GMY 2012 Silver Acrylic Paint on Face, #2, 2012 –  Gede Mahendra Yasa (self-portrait)

 

In early June 2018 the following interview was conducted by Richard Horstman and Gede Mahendra Yasa.

 

RH: Since early 2000 you have been driven by the need to question the popular ‘narratives’ and the status quo within Balinese art.

Why did you begin doing this?

GMY: In 2001, only 3 years after reformation and the fall of the new order regime, Indonesian artist enjoyed new freedoms, and political art came to the fore. For a few decades Sanggar Dewata Indonesia (SDI), Bali’s oldest and most influential collective which began in 1970, held power over the art scene. For me, however, they represented the new order regime, with much of their approach to art continuing on from the Dutch colonial methods. I was determined to change the game here in Bali.

The-Death-of-Gatotkaca. 1500x200. 2013The Death of Gatotkaca, 2014, 150 x 200cm – Gede Mahendra Yasa. Exhibited in “Post Bali”

 

RH: As an art provocateur it was essential to ask important questions in order to be able to move forward, as well as to inspire others to be more analytical and critical. Within the sphere of Indonesian and Balinese art, however, there is no culture of criticism, and such an approach is seen as confrontational. You had to move ‘out of the comfort of your studio’ and into the public forum to be heard.  Was this difficult to do?

GMY: Yes, at the beginning it was very difficult. But slowly the art public accepted my criticism.

RH: The formation of collectives has played an important role, while helping you in the exploration of your ideas. (This first began with the Klinik Seni Taxu. The young artists of Taxu reacted to the institutionalized “authority” over Indonesian art which prevailed during in the 1990’s – 2000. They were driven to promote the development of a Balinese art outside the traditional parameters of Balinese religion and culture and were active between 2001-06 releasing publications and exhibiting. In 2001, as students at the Indonesian Art Institute (ISI) Denpasar, the Taxu group received funding from ISI to hold an art event they titled, Mendobrak Hegemoni (Shattering the Hegemony).

"Paradise Lost" GMY Chinese Ink on Kamasan Canvas 2014

Paradise Lost #2, 2014, Chinese Ink on Kamasan Canvas – Gede Mahendra Yasa

 

What occurred was a protest featuring abusive comments in various languages about the commercialization of art. They attacked copies of major artists works and produced effigies of the artists as mummies, posters proclaimed ‘art is dead’. The event shocked both the singled out artists, and the ISI authorities during an era when the pressures of the New Order Regime were still heavy. The protest was of national significance because Bali had become a key site for the formation of ideas about Indonesian art).

Can you explain why the Taxu group came about and what were their aims?

GMY: Bali has traditions like the banjar system of communal organization. I learned from the influence of the foreign artist during the 1930’s – 1940’s (Spies and Bonnet) and Nyoman Ngendon from Batuan, and in wider context from the first Indonesian community based artist groups (PERSAGI & LEKRA). I understood that organizing groups, following in the tradition of making “schools” of artists was a more strategic and quicker way to achieve goals. This belief pushed me to find artistic idioms for the groups to function as a“glue” (Social realism for Klinik Seni Taxu, and abstraction for Nu-Abstract, his latest collective which began in 2017).

"Between Me,You and the Bedpost #2 Mahendra YasaBetween Me, You and the Bedpost #1. 2014, 100 x 163cm – Gede Mahendra Yasa, Exhibited in “Post Bali”

 

RH: More recently the Neo-Pitamaha has been formed. Can you share more about this collective?

GMY: The origins of the Neo-Pitamaha began after my 2011 solo exhibition in Milan, Italy because of problems with my “identity” as a Balinese painter. I began to think a lot about my artistic roots, and then started to explore Balinese painting (focussing on painting from the last century – the Classical style referred to as Kamasan, and the Batuan traditional style). I believed that the Classical and traditional styles had come to a dead-end. And then I challenged myself to contemporize what the academic artists (especially the Yogyakarta Indonesian Art Institute (ISI) alumni) thought was impossible. And I proved them wrong! In 2013 I “assembled” a new group to push this idea further.

RH: Can you share please the ideas behind your series of paintings made between 2012 – 2018 which began with 7 Magnificent Masterpieces #1 & #2, and continues on with Origen’s Gambit?

"Contemporary Art in Paradise Lost" 2012-2014, 300x75 cmContemporary Art in Paradise Lost, 2014, 75 x 300cm – Gede Mahendra Yasa. Exhibited in “Post Bali”

 

GMY: I wanted to contemporize the Batuan painting style emphasizing the full compositions, with no empty spaces. Complete with the dualities and horror, the dense and decorative style – very Balinese. Unlike the Dutch miniatures such as Brueghel, Bosch, for example, who use the linear perspective. I use the bird eye’s view perspective, like the Batuan artists. I then realised that the series could be used for telling stories about art history (Balinese, Indonesian and global art history). My inspirations came from the American painter Mark Tansey, and also the comic genres, such as Marvel and DC Comics, and how they make alternative universes. I wanted to mimic their method to create my own universe – an art history universe.

Remember this miniature epic series has taken 6 years to develop, so many things have happened. This is on going, and in the near future, in the third phase of this series I plan my approach to be more a linguistic or semiotic exploration. I will “illustrate” a lot of “ideas” about imagery, icons, logos and symbols. Here, I have been influenced by Xu Bing a main land Chinese painter.

"Yasa Perburuan Rusa" GMY 2014                        Yasa Perburuan Rusa, 2014 – Gede Mahendra Yasa

 

RH: You have a long and ongoing relationship with abstract painting. In 2017 you formed the collective NU-abstract to explore further Balinese abstraction and the collective will be exhibiting at NADI Gallery in Jakarta in early July. Do you find exploring your feelings within this genre is the perfect creative pursuit while other concepts need certain periods of time to fully develop and to be successfully executed and expressed? Does this help you to achieve a type of ‘balance’?

GMY: Yes, I need to balance my other painting series as they demand too much logic. There is, however, another reason. I formed the NU-abstract group because there are some Islamic fundamentalist art groups (Rumah Warna, Khat, Khilafah art networks) in Yogyakarta, and Hijrah in Bandung, who want to use non-figurative painting as a tool to forbid the making of imagery of “living creatures”. They twist modern abstraction for their own political benefits while intercepting the potentiality of this new Indonesian art trend. I want to stop their ideas of controlling and polluting the Indonesian art world.

"Yasa Spiral Frame" GMY 2014                              Yasa Spiral Frame, 2014 – Gede Mahendra Yasa

 

Mahendra Yasa along with Neo-Pitamaha co-founder Kemal Ezedine set out to strategically impact upon the Indonesian contemporary art world in 2016 by participating in high level exhibitions and art fairs in Bandung, Jakarta and Yogyakarta. Their presence was especially visible during the two international art fairs, Art Stage Jakarta 2016 and 2016 Bazaar Art Jakarta that attracted large national and foreign audiences.

The Neo-Pitamaha have taken their name from the legendary 1936 artists association established in Ubud during a revolutionary period when traditional art was being modernized for the new and expanding international market – the Pitamaha’s oversaw the successful development of this new genre of art that helped communicate the Balinese culture around the world. The Pitamaha was formed by the prince of Ubud Tjokorda Agung Sukawati, Bali’s modern master Gusti Nyoman Lempad, and the expat foreign artists Walter Spies, and Rudolf Bonnet.

"BipolarDemons" GMY 2017, 200x160Bipolar Demons, 2107, 200 x 150cm – Gede Mahendra Yasa. From the NU-abstract series and exhibited in the group exhibition “Celebrating Indonesian Portraiture” at OHD Museum Magelang, Central Java, continuing through until 8 October 2018.

 

With their ideology deeply rooted in the historical development of Balinese art during the past century, and with a new discourse about Balinese art the Neo-Pitamaha reinterpreted this art form from a contemporary art perspective – retaining the principles involved with the techniques and methods. By opening this to new viewpoints they awakened a new spirit and introduced a fresh model of possibilities into Balinese art.

 

After Paradise Lost 2014-2016In May 2016 at Christie’s Hong Kong Asian Contemporary Art Day Sale “After Paradise Lost” (2014) by Gede Mahendra Yasa sold for HKD 1,240,000 (USD 158,000), well above the estimated price of between HKD 350,000 (USD 44,500) – HKD 500,000 (USD 63,500).

 

Origen's Gambit" GMYAt Christie’s Hong Kong Asian Contemporary Art Day Sale November 2017, Gede Mahendra Yasa’s painting “Origen’s Gambit” (2016-2017) realised HKD 1,750,000 (USD 220,000), selling well above the estimated price of HKD 380,000 (USD48,000) – HKD 550,000 (USD70,000).

 

Gede Mahendra Yasa’s painting After Paradise Lost has been selected as one of the 15 finalists in the Signature Art Prize. The award, which is presented every three years, is organized by the Singapore Art Museum and sponsored by the Asia-Pacific Breweries Foundation. The winner will be announced at an award ceremony on June 29, and the works are currently on exhibit from May 25 to Sept. 2 at the National Museum of Singapore.

 

 

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Coutesy of IndoArtNow, Gede Mahendra Yasa & Richard Horstman

“Dipping in the Kool Aid” highlights collaborations between contemporary artists & inmates of Bali prisons

Rodney Glick "Pixel Buddha" image courtesy of apexart Gallery New York                                           Pixel Buddha – Rodney Glick

 

What is the value of human life?

How does our society appraise personal endeavour, imagination and creativity when the priority of doctors and medical staff in hospitals is the preservation of life? Governments and penal systems assess prisoners as having little to contribute to community, some electing to terminate the lives of ‘serious offenders’ through capital punishment. Why is it acceptable for governments to execute people, while murder is illegal?

The exhibition “Dipping in the Kool Aid” relates to aspects of prisons and the incarceration system, and opened at Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud 4 March. It features the artworks of prisoners, artworks produced from workshops given by contemporary artists in Bali prisons, and independently produced works by some of the invited established and emerging Indonesian and Australian artists.

malaikat copy                                       King Kong’s Land – Malaikat

The works selected from a range of workshops, predominantly in the Klungkung Jail, East Bali, and the Bangli Jail, include installations, paintings, drawings and photographs, along with a painting by a member of the controversial Bali Nine inmates, Renae Lawrence.

“A function of prisons practically everywhere in the world ensures inmates are social outsiders, largely invisible to most citizens,” said Australian artist Mary Lou Pavlovic who organized and curated the exhibition. “Our central concern is to bring aspects of prison life to public view.”

The idea of the exhibition emerged from an art program Pavlovic helped establish with inmates at the Bangli Jail, Central Bali soon after the second round of prisoner executions were ordered by the President of the Republic of Indonesia Joko Widodo in 2015. “Our aim is to cherish and preserve life, the driving motivator for this entire project.”

Mary Lou Pavlovic and prison inmates Mary Lou Pavlovic with input from April, Exyl, Hendra, and Kadek,collaborative installation "Suspended Sentiments" Image courtesy of "Dipping in theSuspended Sentiments – Mary Lou Pavlovic and women inmates from the Klungkung and Bangli jails.

In April 2017 Pavlovic’s proposal written in response to the open call Apex Franchise Exhibition, sponsored by the apexart Gallery New York, offering funded exhibition opportunities, won. More than two hundred international art expert jurors had voted for her proposal to curate an exhibition in Bali about artists and prisoners collaborations arising from prison workshops. A non-profit arts organization in Lower Manhattan, apexart is funded in part by the Andy Warhol Foundation, and offers opportunities to independent curators and emerging and established artists, and challenges ideas about art, its practice, and its curation.

Highlights of “Dipping in the Kool Aid”, in which the cell formation is a theme of the exhibition’s presentation to emphasize the living space – life behind bars within a prison cell, include, the tiny, delicate folded paper birds “Terapi Origami/Orizuru” by Ridwan Fatkhurodin a.k.a. Kriyip on display, yet also given as symbolic gifts to attendees during the opening ceremony, Kenyut Djunaidi’s collaborative etched mirror self-portraits “Kamu Adalah Aku, (You are Me)” and Australian Rodney Glick’s humorously militarized carved wooden icon “Pixel Buddha”. Elizabeth Gower’s “365 Rotations” adds an ethereal element to the show. Multiple circular collages Gower and inmates forged from discarded packaging and advertising material form a constellation of wonderful geometric patterns.

"Angki Purbandono "Out Of the Box" Image courtesy of apexart                                Out of the Box – Angki Purbandono

Popular Indonesian artist Angki Purbandono presents an installation of photographs “Out of the Box” revealing his experience of ‘doing time’. Incarcerated for one year in Yogyakarta during 2013 for smoking marijuana, refusing to accept his imprisonment, Angki declared instead that he was undertaking an artist’s residency, and taught a guard how to take photographs. He also established the Prison Art Programs, a group of inmates and ex-inmates who exhibit art inside and outside the jail; some members are included here.

Three meters by three and a half meters wide, luminescent and sparkling with life “Suspended Sentiments”, features over 1700 individual cells with flowers, leaves, nuts, berries, butterflies, bugs and Christmas decorations embedded within epoxy resin. Pavlovic’s wall installation, the outcome of workshops for women in Klungkung and Bangli Jails is beguiling in beauty and simplicity, yet rich in emotion.

31052365_10155177701881916_4372840048123445248_n                                   Forgiveness #2 – Mangu Putra

“Physical power is defeated by wisdom,” said renowned Balinese painter Agung Mangu Putra of his composition, “Forgiveness 2”. Inspired by an iconic image, originally popularized by Indonesia’s founding father, President Sukarno, who was photographed bowing to his mother, the state symbolically begs the pardon of not only a mother, but of a citizen, instead of the usual power dynamic in which citizens bow before the state. Mangu’s Putra’s painting reveals a state official – a soldier – bowing and begging forgiveness of his mother, who has taken away his gun.

“American jail slang for entering uninvited into a conversation, the phrase “Dipping in the Kool Aid” pays tribute to the discrete Javanese tradition of Pasemon,” Pavlovic said. Reflecting on Indonesia’s revolutionary era of political art that began under the authoritarian President Suharto’s New Order regime (1966-1998), artists and journalists used an indirect form of satire to criticize the government. Pasemon is elegant because it touches the conscience,” she continued. “Correcting without embarrassing authority.”

30706637_10155177599011916_7359454426228064256_n                Terapi Origami/Orizuru  –  Ridwan Fatkhurodin a.k.a. Kriyip

“Values expressed in this exhibition contrast with aspects of the government’s treatment of prisoners recently in Indonesia. Pasemon has created a space for us in which our political positions are clarified without scratching the wound.”

30741219_10155177702336916_1128266463887491072_n              365 Rotations  –  Elizabeth Gower with inmates from Bangli Jail

30703717_10155176985641916_986154805040775168_o               View of “Dipping in the Kool Aid” at the Tony Raka Art Gallery

 

30708338_10155177599166916_6226232579398303744_n        After Hit n Run  –  Herman Yosef Dhyas Aries Utomo (a.k.a. Komeng)

 

Dipping in the Kool Aid”

Open to the public daily 10am – 5pm,

4 – 31 March 2018

Tony Raka Art Gallery,

JI.Raya Mas No. 86 Mas, Ubud, Bali.

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: apexart Gallery New York, Mary Lou Pavlovic & Bima Basudewa