Category Archives: Indonesian Contemporary Art

Menjumput Masa Lalu – picking up the past

20170522_131213                         Generasi J.K #1,2,3 2016 – Nyoman Suarnata

Ubud’s Sika Gallery presents Menjumput Masa Lalu (picking up the past), a group exhibition of contemporary artworks by the # PK collective. On show from 21 May are installations, drawings, paintings, videoart, object art, scpultures, and graphics by five young Balinese artists I Gede Jaya Putra, Ngakan Putu Agus Arta Wijaya (NPAAW), I Nyoman Suarnata, I Made Putra Indrawan, and I Putu Nova Ruspika Yanto, along with written text by female arts and language freelancer Savitri Sastrawan.

All the participants were students at the Indonesian Art Institute (ISI) in Denpasar, studying between 2006 – 2009. Their works explore themes from the serious, to light- hearted and include environmental issues, the conflict between tradition and modernity, identity, the erosion of Indonesian democracy, and even thought-provoking themes that incite humour.

20170522_131349                              Home, 2017 – Putu Nova Ruspika Yanto

Full Space 2016, by Nyoman Suarnata (b.1987, Mengwi, Badung) is a progressive representation of iconic local subject matter that is too often translated into conventional painted forms. His installation of two-dimensional canvases taking on 3 dimensional hexagonal forms adds fresh life to the subject matter. Suarnata’s images related to the cultural pasttime of tajen (cock-fighting) are rendered in 3 colours systems evoking different eras; black & white (conjuring up pre modern Bali), monochrome, and dynamic realism (suggesting modernity).

"Black and White" Ngakan Putu Agus Arta Wijaya                   Black & White, 2017 – Ngakan Putu Agus Arta Wijaya

Text by Sastrawan (b.1990 Denpasar) is a response to the collective’s artworks revealing her thoughts related to struggle; not only of Indonesia’s on-going journey of democracy, yet also the everyday challenges that confront young artists. Her writings are set within the form of an installation, centrally positioned is a humourous, yet disturbing illustration. The Garuda Pancasila, the mythical eagle featured on Indonesia’s national emblem, with the motto Bhinneka Tunggal Ika (unity in diverstiy), is hospitalized and receiving care. Corruption, violence, injustice and inquality, seemingly sanctioned by the country’s ruling elite, are current and real threats to democracy.

Tentang aku jendela rumah dan angin, (about my window house and the wind) by Made Putra Indrawan (b. 1987, Denpasar) is a light-hearted and quirky installation. He presents a small box through which an nondescript, whimsical creature peers out through a window, the medium is timber. From a tiny electronic device inside the sound of strong winds emanate, while the words – tentang aku jendela rumah dan angin are emblazoned across the wall. The audience is prompted to imagine the artist as this curious creature.

Savitri Sastrawan               Let’s Pick Up the Past With PK! 2017 – Savitri Sastrawan

Diary Book # 1 & 2, by Putu Nova Ruspika Yanto introduces alternative asethetics and techniques to the exhibition, aiding in its overall strength. His woodcut images are presented within the format of two diaries. While one book depicts images of his young son and wife, the other narrative is his observations of dramatic and disheartening change. The artist’s home environment was once cool, green and clean has, within the space of a few decades, become barren, void of trees. It’s now hot and dry, and polluted.

The work of two promising Balinese talents, Gede Jaya Putra and NPAAW are showcased in Menjumput Masa Lalu, both are worthy of close observation as they mature. Jaya Putra (b.1988, Kerobokan) attracted much attention with Transformation, his first solo exhibition in 2013, revealing remarkable depth in the exploration of his social themes, equally supported by his imaginative works.

"Generasi Sintetis" Gede Jaya Putra                Generasi Sintetis 2017, (Synthetic Generation) – Gede Jaya Putra

Generasi Sintetis 2017, (Synthetic Generation) emphasizes his ongoing theme of the process of change that is confronting today’s yonger generation, specifically the change from the natural, to the synthetic world. The large installation comprises of three elements, and includes more than 20 pencil sketches of the foliage of different trees positioned upon sections of tree trunks functioning as pedestals. Two screens reveal videos, one of colourful flowers and foliage, the other, shot in black & white, focusses upon the physical structure of branches, and its myriad of abstract forms. The contrast between what is real and that which is illusory is powerful, highlighting the demise of the natural environment, which is increasingly threatened by modern development.

The focal piece of Generasi Sintetis is a hybrid character, part human, part machine, the icon central to Jaya Putra’s transformation theme, his representation of the younger generation of Balinese. A black, life sized, two dimensional figure holding a glass jar containing a synthetic eco system.

20170522_131104Tentang aku jendela rumah dan angin, (about my window house and the wind) 2017 – Made Putra Indrawan

The medium of video art IS the most challenging format for an artist to master, and to successfully communicate his ideas. The most effective works are generally short, no longer than two minutes, with simple messages that are easy to read. The audiences’ attention must be captured from the beginning of the video and maintained until the very end. The moment boredom sets in our attention wanders, yearning for fresh stimulus, and the artist loses his audience.

Jaya Putra has been experimenting with this format for the past five years. Merasakan Ibu Pertiwi (feel mother earth), 2017, his 2-minute performance video, features the artist walking bare-footed through the crowded city streets of Japan, “feeling” the earth. We become observers of contrasting imagery, Jaya Putra’s feet making direct connection, as opposed to the multitude wearing shoes. Jaya Putra attaches the video screen to the gallery ceiling so we must look up to observe what in reality is always witnessed when looking down. Jaya Putra’s work is uncomplicated and thought-provoking, while communicating a facet of Balinese cultural worldview.

"Full Space #1 #2 & #3" Nyoman Suarnata                            Full Space #1,2,&3, 2016 – Nyoman Suarnata

NPAAW (b. 1990 Pejeng, Gianyar) is currently based in Yogyakarta, Central Java, Indonesia’s largest, most diverse and dynamic art community. In Menjumput Masa Lalu he presents three round paintings and one installtion, rendered in black and white tones and representing duality. Two meters in diameter, Black & White is an interguing composition, a part of his ongoing theme featuring animals in metaphorical scenarios representing the never-ending cycle of life, and the constant process of change. His composition features two horses with elongated bodies, one black, the other white, travelling in clockwise motion. The foreground features the Beatles walking in counter-clockwise direction, reminiscent of their famous album cover Abbey Road.

Zebranizasi is a fascinating installation, again emphasizing duality, and that according to Balinese Hindu philosophies, all life and universal order is subject to equal and opposing forces. The installation features 6 individual works, three iconic Balinese cultural creatures, another two the lucky charm of the Japanese, maneki-neko, the waving cat. The final piece reveals a dramatic, yet impossible scenario upon a chess board. The horse or Knight is painted as a zebra, balancing both the positive and negative forces, and has the black and white kings in a check mate position.

"Zebraniasi" Ngakan Putu Agus Arta Wijaya                    Zebranizasi, 2017 – Ngakan Putu Agus Arta Wijaya

The contributions by the Sika Gallery in the support and development of Balinese contemporary art is unsurpassed. The vision of painter, sculptor, writer, critic and provocatur Wayan Sika (b.1949, Silakarang, Gianyar), in 1996 he opened Bali’s first non-commercial artist’s driven space to provide a platform for the avant-garde that was quickly evolving on the island. Continuing in the tradition of exhibiting young and immerging local artist’s the Sika Gallery presents Menjumput Masa Lalu, continuing through until 3 June 2017.

Detail of Installation "Generasi Sintetis" Gede Jaya Putra      Detail of Generasi Sintetis 2017, (Synthetic Generation) – Gede Jaya Putra

20170522_131328                       Diary Book # 1, 2017Putu Nova Ruspika Yanto

Menjumput Masa Lalu (picking up the past)

21 May – 3 June

Sika Gallery

Jalan Raya Campuhan

Ubud, Bali

Open daily 9am – 5pm

Words & Images: Richard Horstman

 

 

 

ART|JOG|10 – Changing Perspective

RJ Katamsi WIP 5Yogyakarta artists work on the R.J Katamsi statue, a project designed and overseen by Wahyu Santoso, honouring the artist, and one of the founders, and the president director of Akademi Seni Rupa Indonesia (ASRI), the first fine arts campus in Indonesia, opened in 1950 (now known as ISI). The work will be erected at the historical JNM, the original ASRI site.

 

A milestone in Indonesian art will be celebrated in May during the Grand Opening of ART|JOG|10, marking a decade in the ART|JOG journey, beginning 19 May at the Jogja National Museum (JNM). Themed: Changing Perspective, the fair will exhibit immerging and established artists side-by-side, while featuring some of Indonesia’s hottest contemporary talent.

An initiative born from the collective will of the Yogyakarta art community, ART|JOG’s significance is its model: a supporting and promotional platform for artists, not galleries, introducing fresh names to the market. The vision of Heri Pemad, who through his support of the local art scene starting some 20 years ago developed strong relationships of trust within the community, the springboard for bigger and brighter things.

"Floating Eyes" Wedhar Riyadi, Jogja National Museum front entry. Image by Richard HorstmanART|JOG|10 2017 commissioned art work “Floating Eyes” by Yogyakarta artist Wedhar Riyadi, at the front facade of the Jogja National Museum.

“ART | JOG has grown quickly since 2008, when it was Jogja Art Fair (JAF). From 2009 we included curators, selected special themes, and artists, and commissioned artists to remodel the façade of the building, originally Taman Budaya Yogyakarta. Wanting to create an international event, in 2010 we renamed it ART | JOG,” said CEO and founder of ART|JOG Heri Pemad.

“We attracted more and more international visitors in 2011 due to increasingly widespread publication, and began inviting international artists for special presentations. From 2012 our curatorial themes evolved. In short, ART | JOG has grown along with the development of the art world itself, because it has presented the development of artwork from Indonesia and the world.”

A Decade of ArtJog's Journey. Image Richard Horstman                                    A decade of ART|JOG’s journey

With a keen eye for the artist’s needs, Pemad launched Heri Pemad Art Management (HPAM) in 2004, an organization that evolved out of his personalized art services. HPAM has since played a defining role in the development of Indonesian contemporary art. This year ART|JOG|10 will exhibit over 120 artworks; 2 & 3 dimensional works, installations, videos, site-specific objects, and performances.

ART|JOG is the anchor event for the Jogja Art Weeks, a month long abundance of openings and events around the Yogyakarta Special Regency, which has developed into an art and cultural tourism boon, attracting national and international art lovers, industry insiders, and collectors.

20170519_125233                                   Poor Yorick – Ichwan Noor

“We have selected 73, national and international artists, this year, via our Open Call Application, whether by invitation, or those who self-applied,” said ART|JOG|10 co-curator Ignatia Nilu. “Our selection process is not only based on the compatibility between the artwork and curatorial concept, but also the presentation method, and the freshness of the artistic concept.” Nilu adds, “The Open Call program is an unsurpassed way to scout the best young talent.”

ART|JOG|10’s main program includes the exhibition by Indonesian, and also artists from Singapore, Japan, England, USA and Australia. Some of the local names showing are Angki Purbandono in collaboration with Nicholas Saputra, Agus Suwage, I Nyoman Masriadi, Tromarama and Agan Harahap. This year’s Commissioned Works are by Wedhar Riyadi, a young Yogyakarta artist, presenting his balloons installation, decorated with eye icons, transforming the main facade of JNM.

20170519_125333.jpg                   Souvenir from Tangahan – Angki Purbandono

“Through the theme, Changing Perspectives: The Challenge For The Artist, we dare the artists to take a fresh look at how they work from various point of views,” said Bambang “Toko” Witjaksono, of the curatorial team. “Not only from technical aspect, but also the interpretation, to hopefully enhance, and achieve beyond what we have had, and have experienced to now.”

A new and special highlight of ART|JOG|10 is The Making Of The Statue Of R.J Katamsi, a 2.5 bronze made in conjunction with Wahyu Santoso. The statue honours the artist, and one of the founders, and the president director of Akademi Seni Rupa Indonesia (ASRI), the first fine arts campus in Indonesia, opened in 1950 (now known as ISI). The work will be erected at the historical JNM, the original ASRI site.

20170519_125429                                   Dasar – Rudi Mantofani

The event’s Supporting Program includes an Open Air Cinema, a collaboration with Jogja-Netpac Asian Film Festival (JAFF). The Young Artist Award, an award for the best young participating artists under 33 years old or below. Jogja Art Weeks, a publication providing comprehensive information about art and cultural happenings in Yogyakarta from May-June, (the free guide book will enhance the visitor experience, while being an essential supportive platform for the art tourism program), and the Merchandise Project has invited 20 artists, including Eko Nugroho, Papermoon Theatre, Oky Rey Montha, Farid Stevy, and Bob Sick Yudhita to create special buyables.

For ART|JOG|10 VIP guests the special preview on 19 May begins 5 hours prior to the exhibition officially opens.

Supporting Program Time & Dates:

Curatorial Tours: Saturday, 27 May & 10 June, 3 PM, Sunday, 4 & 18 June, 3 PM.

Meet The Artists: Sunday 28 May & 11 June, 3 PM, Santurday, 3 & 17 June, 3 PM.

Open Air Cinema: Tuesday 23 & 30 May, 6 & 13 June, 7:30 PM.

ASRI Tours: Tueday 6 & 13 June, 3 PM.

20170519_130238                              Be Ready – Nyoman Masriadi

ART|JOG|10

Open from 7pm 19 May

Continuing through to 19 June 2017

Daily from 9am – 5pm

Jogja National Museum

Jalan Prof. Ki Amri Yahya No. 1, Yogyakarta

www.artjog.co.id

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Courtesy ArtJog10 & Richard Horstman

20170519_132451Study of convex and concave by M.C Escher, 1955 – Agung Prabowo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sutjipto Adi

'Lotuses 5', mixed media on canvas, 2009.                                         Lotus #5, 2009 – Sutjipto Adi

In 1987, thirty-year old East Javanese artist Sutjipto Adi, exhibited paintings at TIM Jakarta Cultural Center, in his second solo show. Sophisticated and highly articulate, Adi’s visionary compositions revealed an extraordinary talent that was to capture the attention of the Indonesian contemporary art world.

Combining meticulous drawing with realism painting techniques, Adi’s symbols, figures, and forms, rendered upon a framework of geometrical designs, come alive in compositions that are mysterious, and futuristic. Within his works the visual information often resonates out from one central point – distinct lines emanating from the canvas’ core – while other lines, both vertical and horizontal, create grids of triangular, fragmented portions. What appear like kaleidoscope visions are in fact perfectly balanced compositions achieved through the execution of a clever and systematic, visual formula.

Sutjipto Adi and unknown character 1987 solo exhibition TIM Jakarta                         Sutjipto Adi 1987, TIM Jakarta

Otherworldly scenarios reveal abstract forms, spherical, planet like objects, and enigmatic symbols floating within interstellar backdrops. The artist often depicts himself in various stages of life: from the embryonic, to the baby, and then the adult. Adi’s paintings are insights into the enigmatic nature of life and its place within the order of the cosmos.

“My work reflects my quest for meaning in the perfection of human life. They simply mirror life itself, while underlining the fact that there is much more going on than meets the eye,” Adi says.

Gifted with unique ability, and a powerfully inquisitive mind, Adi, who was born in 1957, was raised in a multi-religious family in Jember. His mother a follower of the Catholic faith, his father a Buddhist, while his brother a Muslim. Religion is one of the significant forces that shape the Indonesian cultural discourse, yet spirituality is the key dynamic within Adi’s life journey, and how he constructs his worldview.

Work in Progress 2017 - Sutjipto Adi                            Work in Progressive 2017 – Sutjipto Adi

“From an early age I practiced my own techniques of exercise and meditation, yet it was not a traditional style of yoga, rather a personal act that achieved strong feelings. Later I chose to bring the Buddhism doctrines into my life. Not because I believed it to be a superior religion,” to the contrary, the artist said, “I was allowed to feel a personal sense of harmony.”

After studying art at the Indonesian Fine Art School, Adi then continued on at the Indonesian Fine Art Academy (ASRI), in Yogyakarta, Central Java from 1977–1981. “In 1986 I relocated to the Island of the Gods, sensing the ‘spirit of Bali’ as a safe and fertile realm for my continued creative development, and stimulus.”

Living in Bali proved to be a perfect environment for the artists’ deep and reflective nature. His stoic work ethic balanced, while immersed within the Balinese culture, and the creative energy that island is internationally renown. In 1991 Adi’s third solo exhibition was held in Ubud. He continued to exhibit consistently in national and international group exhibitions, and with leading galleries in Jakarta.

'Lotuses 3', 2009, mixed media on canvas.                              Lotus #3, 2008 – Sutjipto Adi

Along with other artists during the 1990’s Adi was one of the forerunners of a new realism movement that was evolving within Indonesian contemporary art. Photography became a crucial part of his technique. A special part of his process, however, is to travel, experience, be still, and observe.

“Meditation not only gives us the light of insight, but also the power for expansive change,” Adi says. “By having faith in our spiritual journey we both may learn and will be provided the tools to steer us through the physical and non-physical labyrinths that encompass us all.”

A strong sense of innovation has driven Adi’s artistic development, he incorporated digital art collage, and the use of pencil in his works well prior to his fellow contemporaries. His depiction of iconic characters such as John Lennon, the Dalai Lama, and Buddhist monks as central subjects in the compositions occurred well before it became a national trend.

'Reincarnation', circa 1985, mixed media on canvas,                               Reincarnation, 1985 – Sutjipto Adi

His process of self-discovery is reflected in the changing colors Adi has utilized during his career. His work is witness to his transformation of spirit; his darker colors during his younger days reflect an unsettled conscience in the process of self-analysis. Lighter, and brighter colors mirrors the easing of internal tensions during his personal growth.

Unlike other Asian cultures, Indonesian art does not have a tradition of drawing. Lead, charcoal, pastel and colored pencils, for the past two decades, have become Adi’s exclusive mediums of choice. The technique he chooses is not only the application of line to give structure and form, rather a method influenced from photographic images, to build form via the subtle, and painstaking use of line to suggest elements of skin tone, facial and body features.

WALK TO FREEDOM 2010                        Long Walk to Freedom, 2010 – Sutjipto Adi

“Within the mind of the photographer, second-by- second, essential elements come together,” Adi says. “Composition, lighting, character, and sensitivity for the object, all fuse within an instance, to capture a special moment. ”

Photography has had an unparalleled impact on modern and contemporary realism art, as well as Sutjipto Adi’s. His drawing technique bursts into life with the inclusion of bright colors and hues from colored pencils and pastels. While the majority of Indonesian contemporary art draws it techniques and themes from outside and the West, Adi is unique within the canons of Indonesian art. If you travel abroad to see the finest museum collections of modern and contemporary art, such a technique cannot be found.

Profile - Sutjipto Adi                                             Sutjipto Adi 2010, Ubud, Bali

In his depictions of the human form Adi deliberately presents both the old and the young side-by-side; a tiny baby contrasted with an elderly monk, or his young son positioned along with himself. While its important to include the iconic figures, he too includes the other ‘heroes’ – the normal, everyday people, and the poor, who endure, and soldier on through life.

“My intention is to present these figures as archetypes of faith,” Adi says. The metaphors he conveys are an essential message about life itself.   “The youth of today’s world require good role models, fine examples of behavior, moral courage, and strength to successfully ‘navigate’ the journey of life.”

As he has matured Sutjipto Adi’s paintings have become less esoteric, and easier to read, yet always ‘speak’ of the human spirit. They are profound, and important messages of hope.

Sutjipto Adi-02.jpg

12705556_130837783971464_8343773337595062100_n

Exotic, 93 x 64 cm, 2008                                      Exotic, 2008 – Sutjipto Adi

 

Words & Images: Richard Horstman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bali Artists’ Camp 2016 Exhibition

Made Budhiana "Badak Taman Ujung Karangasem"                Badak Taman Ujung Karangasem – Made Budhiana

Impressions of some of Bali’s most important archeological sites, the 11th century Gunung Kawi temple in Tampaksiring, and the stone reliefs at Yeh Pulu in Bedulu, along with dramatic landscapes depictions from remote East Bali, went on display at the Bali Artists’ Camp 2016 Exhibition.

Open from 8 April – May 22 at the Made Budhiana Gallery, Ubud, and featuring more than 30 paintings, sketches, and installations by local and foreign artists, the exhibition marks the fifth year of engagement between the Northern Territory of Australia and Bali, and Eastern Indonesia.

Gede Gunada "Yeh Pulu"                                       Yeh Pulu – Gede Gunada

An art and cultural engagement that began in 2012, the Bali Artists’ Camp’s vision evolves around engagement with the landscape, nature, and the rich Balinese culture. The event brings together artists from Bali and Indonesia, with their counter parts from Australia, and other foreign countries, to visit inspiring sites throughout Bali, to work on location in a visual art and cross-cultural exchange exercise.

The fruits of the 2016 Bali Artists’ Camp, themed engagement with monumental Bali, produced on separate occasions in May, June, July and September 2016 (collectively a period of seven weeks), will be displayed until 22 May. The vibrant collection includes works by renown Balinese artists Made Budhiana, along with Made Sudibia and Gede Gunada from Bali, and paintings by Freddy Sitorus, born in South Sulawesi, and East Javanese painter Nanik Suryani.

Nanik Suryani "Gunung Kawi"                                       Gunung Kawi – Nanik Suryani

The foreign artist’s contributions reflect different artistic approaches and backgrounds, Japanese artist Rie Mandala’s offerings are delicate works in ink on paper. Well-known Australian artist Michael Downs’ compositions have both surreal and abstract sensibilities, fellow countryman Ivor Cole prefers to works in oil, in his realism paintings, while Australian Mary Lou Pavlovic’s presentations are forged from an array of media, including timber and plastic, with the addition of paint and other decorative media.

Ivor Cole said of his experience, “the cultural divide between the artists is quickly wiped away. There is no separation, we are here to absorb and translate the best we can through the visual image, the emotional, spiritual state of this place and this time.”

Ivor Cole                                        Puri Prima – Ivor Cole

“The Northern Territory – Indonesia relationship has a long history of trade and cultural exchange,” said Michael Gunner, the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory, who is one of the co sponsors of the event.

“For hundreds of years trade and cultural exchange flourished between the Macassans (people from present day Sulawesi and related islands) and aboriginals of the Northern Territory. Since the birth of the Republic of Indonesia, and the attainment of Self- Government for the Northern Territory in 1978, there has been an increased focus on acknowledging and strengthening our economic, cultural and social ties within the region,” Gunner adds.

Made Sudibia - "Perwujdudan Dewi Kesuburan"                                 Perwududan Dewi – Made Sudibia

“I had the honor of traveling through the lush tropical landscape with the local artists visiting spectacular temples and monuments,” Mary Lou Pavlovic said. “And I was struck by how close to nature the Balinese and Indonesian artists were, everywhere we went they knew all the fruit and medicinal herbs. I realized although I long to feel this affinity with nature, I am not from a culture that exists in the same way with nature.”

The Bali Artists’ Camp compliments the Artists’ Camp art engagement project run in alternative years by the Northern Center For Contemporary Art (NCCA) in Darwin.      “The Artists’ Camp involves Balinese and Indonesian artists traveling to the Top End of the Northern Territory and interpreting its rugged and diverse landscape, together with an artistic and cultural interaction with Aboriginal artists,” said the founder of the Made Budhiana Gallery, Australian Colin MacDonald.

Michael Downs "Gambelan Landscape"                           Gambelan Landscape – Michael Downs

“The camp started as a concept with the original Director of Museums and Art Galleries in the Northern Territory (MAGNT), Dr Colin Jack Hinton back in 1978.” MacDonald, the former Director and Chairman of the Board of MAGNT, developed the concept further when he took Balinese artist Made Budhiana to the NT to participate in the first international Artists’ Camp, along with Australian and Malaysian artists in 1990.

The vision of the ten-year program of the Artists’ Camp is that the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory, the Australian Prime Minister and the Indonesian President will open a touring exhibition at the Australian National Gallery that will include the first retrospective of the Australian-Indonesian artists’ engagement.

Study for a Monument of Flowers             Study for a Monument of Flowers – May Lou Pavlovic

 

The Bali Governor, Made Pastika, who is also a supporter of the event, will visit the exhibition in early May to meet the artists, and to be presented works by the artists.

This project has had the on-going and enthusiastic support from the Indonesian Foreign Affairs Department, the Australia Indonesia Institute and the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs, especially successive Australian Consul Generals.

20170414_085327                                    Batur – Gede Gunada

Made Budhiana Gallery

Villa Pandan Harum

Jl. Anak Agung Gede Rai

Banjar Abian Semal

Gang Pandan Harum

Lotonduh, Ubud

Tel: 0361 981624

Words & Images: Richard Horstman

 

No place like home – Ari Bayuaji

View of 'No place like home' from outside the front of Kunsthal Rotterdam Image Ari Bayuaji     View of ‘no place like home’ from outside of Gallery 6, Kunsthal Rotterdam

The Kunsthal Rotterdam, a leading cultural institution in the Netherlands, through it’s program Kunsthal Light challenges artists to create site-specific works to be exhibited within a most unconventional space.

An elongated and narrow slopping showcase ramp, with generous vertical height, Gallery 6, is positioned adjacent to the window at the forefront of the museum. While also functioning as walkway through which visitors cross from one gallery to the next, it becomes a ‘display cabinet’ for artworks, to be observed outside by passersby.

17264168_10154227288921956_8483278281296326009_n                         Detail of ‘no place like home’

During Kunsthal Light #16 Montreal based, ‘Indonesian born’ artist Ari Bayuaji occupied Gallery 6 from 9 March, until the exhibition’s official opening on the 18th, transforming it with his installation ‘No place like home’. Constructed from eclectic 3D sculptures, drawings, paintings and photographs, the exhibition, which continues until 28 June, features references to locations throughout the world where Bayuaji has been, and the resources that people utilize to create their homes.

Beginning early January Bayuaji visited the Kunsthal to gain vital insights and then returned to Canada to select materials from his studio collection to be shipped to the Netherlands. Two months later he was tasked with creating an installation, or a ‘puzzle’ as the East Javanese, former civil engineer, said.

Aji Bayuaji at KunsthalLight16 Image by Marcel Kollen                             Ari installing ‘No place like home’

“The gallery is not just a blank white wall, there are, however other elements, such as the varying height, CCTV cameras, doors, speakers and a balcony that I must consider, and include in my work. I employ plywood, paper, plastic tarpaulin, and canvas to represent urban life in different parts of the world where some people might adopt these materials to build a place they call ‘home’.”

A collector of distinctive, often unusual bits and pieces, items from as far as Mexico to Bali become meaningful icons in this work. Plastic bags and ropes littering beaches are utilized, as too are small weathered windows frame old letters, and pictures from magazines. Throughout the installation Bayuaji creates beautiful and contrasting visual landscapes.

No lace like home - Ari Bayuaji. Image by the artist                             Detail of, ‘No place like home’

“There is no direct connection. The ‘exotic objects’ that came from far away are there for the audience to see, absorb, and to learn more about,” he said. Traditional dancers upon a Bali picture postcard point to CCTV camera, currency notes, discarded keys and utensils he juxtaposes with colorful geometrical forms painted directly upon the 60 meters long wall.

“I love to work with ready-made objects, like wooden architectural ornaments from old buildings found in Indonesia and Canada. Some of these items may be old, but the ‘content’ is new as I inject them with emotions that are influenced by the contemporary issues I seek to address in my work,” said the 42 year-old artist, who admits this project has been confronting, yet a career-defining experience as well.

Visitors during the 18 March opening Kunsthal Light 16 Image Aji Bayuaji              Visitors during the opening evening of ‘No place like home’

“Ari came to our attention via Natasha Sidharta, a friend of Kunsthal’s director Emily Ansenk. Emily and I where impressed and immediately felt he was a perfect fit for our program,” said curator Natalya Boender. “Ari took his cultural background and heritage and by giving the title ‘No place like home’ and using the general ‘home’ as a subject says a lot about him as a person and an artist. We like artists that are not afraid to tell a story.”

“Working in Gallery 6 is akin to performance art where the visitors can observe my process, and can interact with me as they like. This is new for me because normally I work alone in my studio,” Bayuaji said. “Surprisingly I have enjoyed how they respond, or react. European audiences can be very direct, and this engagement has helped me mature as an artist.”

17264927_10154227289001956_4218543065809826751_n                             Detail of ‘No place like home’

“Many asked about the materials I used, opening up bigger conversations about my culture and background. Some shared their ideas of ‘home’, and even about their political point of view.”

A two-meter square black and white photograph reveals a slum dweller peering out from behind a shanty door, while eighty Mexican canvas moneybags are sewn together to form an ‘Alternative Wall’, Bayuaji’s satire of US President Trump’s border wall and a play on ‘alternative facts’.

“The more freedom I am granted by a big institution the greater the pressure I feel. I have to create something that I really like to work on to show the public, while delivering my ‘voice’. These considerations help me to work in subtle ways.” Having the autonomy of creating such a large installation helped Bayuaji learn how to be the ‘curator’ of his own work.

17361632_10154227288736956_8422524388330762822_n                                Detail of ‘No place like home’

“The current geopolitical landscape is rapidly changing the way people live. Many from all over the world have been moving, immigrating and being displaced from one place to the next,” said the artist who in 2004 moved from Indonesia to Canada to study fine art at the Concordia University of Montreal. “There are many places people call home that have been destroyed because of wars and uprisings, or natural disasters too.”

“As a contemporary artist I want to talk about problems that concern me. I trust that the experience will touch people’s heart so they may share a little space of their own home for people who need a place to feel accepted and safe.”

“We were really touched by Ari’s commitment to make political jokes in his work while being very serious and poetic at the same time. This is a rare quality, and it makes his work relevant,” Boender adds. “The fact that Ari comments on critical global issues in a very approachable manner is a beautiful way to share experiences and ideas.”

17353277_10154227309541956_4859946872236865801_n                                Detail of ‘No place like home’

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No place like home

IMG_0473                                           Artist Ari Bayuaji, right

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: Marcel Kollen & Ari Bayuaji

No Place Like Home,

Kunsthal Light #16

Continuing through until 28 June, 2017

Kunsthal Rotterdam

Info: +31 (0)10-4400301,

www.kunsthal.nl

 

 

 

Previewing Indonesian Modern & Contemporary Art at Sotheby’s Hong Kong Spring Sale

The 1-5 April Sotheby’s Hong Kong Spring Sales, a highly anticipated auction on the 2017 global calendar, inevitably will draw increased global attention to the Asian region.

Sotheby’s first conducted sales in Hong Kong in 1972. For the first time however, works by iconic Western contemporary artists Andy Warhol, Jean Michel Basquiat and Damien Hirst will be presented during the 2 April Modern and Contemporary Art Evening Sale, to be held at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center.

Affandi, Colosseum, Roma.Image courtesy sotheby's HK                             Lot 1047 Colosseum, RomaAffandi

For collectors of Indonesian modern art the following works will be of interest, especially Lot 1047 Colosseum, Roma. Painted in 1972, this is one of the three known depictions of the famous Roman amphitheater by Affandi, (1907-1990). Arguably Indonesia’s most important modernists Affandi was the first Indonesian to exhibit in the Venice Biennale in 1954.

Capturing afternoon sunlight emblazoning the arena, this rare work would compliment any Affandi connoisseurs collection, and has an estimated price between HKD 2,200,000 – 2,500,000 (Rp.378,070,000–601,480,000). Lot 1048, Barong, 1966, also by Affandi, has an estimated price between HKD 1,800,000-2,800,000 (Rp.3,091,880,000-4,809,600,000).

Lee Man Fong_Balinese Procession                               Lot 1024, Balinese ProcessionLee Man Fong

Lot 1021, The Lotus Pond, is by Belgian impressionist painter Adrien Jean le Mayeur (1880-1958), who fist settled on Bali in 1932. One of several pieces he left unfinished upon his death, it portrays Balinese beautiful women in, and surrounding a pond. It’s estimated price ranges between HKD 3,800,000 – 5,500,000 (Rp.6,527,310,000 –9,447,420,000).

Lee Man Fong, (b. Guangzhou 1913-1988) spent extended periods painting in Bali. Lot 1024, Balinese Procession is an excellent work, highlighted by his fusion of East and West styles with an estimated price between HKD 10,000,000-15,000,000 (Rp.17,177,100,000–25,765,700,000).

Hendra Gunawan_Cucu-Cucu Witarsa Mengenang Bintang PSSI. ALM. Djamiart Dhalhar (The Grandchildren of Witarsa Commemorating Indonesian Football Star, the late Djamiat Dhalhar)Lot 369,Cucu-cucu Witarsa Mengenang Bintang PSSI. Alm. Djamiart Dhalhar (The Grandchildren of Witarsa Commemorating Indonesian Football Star, the Late Djamiat Dhalhar) – Hendra Gunawan

Three contemporary works are offered in this sale. Lot 1056, Cakrawala Warna #8 (Colour Horizon #8) 2012-2016, by renowned painter Rudi Mantofani (b. 1973, Padang, West Sumatra) has an estimated price between HKD 650,000-950,000 (Rp.1,116,510,000-1,631,830,000),  Lot 1057, I Nyoman Masriadi, The Old Master (Snapping Provocation of Samuro) 2016 is estimated between HKD 1,800,000-2,800,000 (Rp.3,091,880,000-4,809,600,000), An abstract composition by the most prized Indonesian woman contemporary artist, Aye Tjoe Christine, Lot 1059, Black and the Small White, 2014, has an estimated price of between HKD 500,000-700,000 (Rp.858,856,000-1,202,400,000).

Arin Dwihartanto Sunaryo_Harmonic Tremor             Lot 219, Harmonic Tremor, 2016 – Arin Dwihartanto Sunaryo

A diverse array of more than 30 works by Indonesian artists, with price ranges to suit all budgets, are offered the following day during the 3 April Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art Sale. Works from emerging, established, senior, and deceased artists are presented.

For new buyers wishing to enter the Indonesian market there are opportunities with works by prominent contemporary names going under the hammer within the lower range of estimated prices, including Heri Dono, Yunizar and Agus Suwage. Some artists in the middle to upper price range are Rudi Mantofani, Nasirun, I Nyoman Masriadi, and Rudi Mantofani.

Agus Triyanto BR_Savana Dance                             Lot 208, Savana DanceAgus Triyanto BR

One of the emerging artists featured is Angki Purbandono (b.1971 Yogyakarta), a pioneer in the use of digital scanning technology (scanography) in Indonesian contemporary art. Lot 212, The Plastic Guns – Violence for Beginners, a scanography transparency in neon box installation has an estimated price of between HKD 20,000-40,000 (Rp.34,351,500-68,703,000). Another is East Javanese painter Agus Triyanto BR (b.1979), Lot 208, Savana Dance, 2016, is a surrealistic composition with an estimated price between HKD40,000-60,000 (Rp.68,703,000-103,063,000).

Lot 211, Multicolor, 2016 by Arin Dwihartanto Sunaryo (b.1978, Bandung) is a dynamic composition created by a moving blend of poured pigment paint suspenAgus Triyanto BRded in resin and pressed upon glass. The three panel work, 180 x 465 cm has an estimated price of between HKD 40,000-60,000 (Rp.68,703,000-103,063,000).

189HK0717_XXXXX             Lot 350, Three Balinese Maidens With Offerings – Theo Meier

For seasoned collectors the sale features eight paintings by Lee Man Fong, four by Affandi, three by Srihadi Sudarsono, and three compositions by S. Sudjojono, who is considered the one of the fathers of Indonesian modern art. Lot 372 Pemendangan (Landscape), has an estimated price between HKD 650,000-950,000 (Rp.1,114,630,000-1,629,080,000).

Lot 369,Cucu-cucu Witarsa Mengenang Bintang PSSI. Alm. Djamiart Dhalhar (The Grandchildren of Witarsa Commemorating Indonesian Football Star, the Late Djamiat Dhalhar), is by artist, poet, sculptor and guerilla fighter Hendra Gunawan (1918-1983). It depicts a group of children playing football in a surrealistic landscape and is estimated between HKD 1,000,000-2,000,000 (Rp.1,714,820,000-3,429,640,000).

217HK0717_XXXXX          Lot 213, Pemandangan Dari Atas (Landscape From Above) – Nasirun

Works by noted foreign artists include Dutch painters Willen Gerard Hofker (1902-1981) and Arie Smit (b.1916, The Netherlands – 2016, Bali), along with Theo Meier (Switzerland 1908-1982), Adrien Jean le Mayeur.

Buyers bidding over the phone, and on the Internet, who are unable to attend the previews days or auction are advised to contact Sotheby’s and enquire about the colour reproduction accuracy of the images contained within the online catalogue to ensure that what they wish to purchase can be realistically gaged. Condition reports of the works, outlining the paintings current state and whether it has repairs or over painting are available upon request. Provenance, the historical data of the works previous owner/s is also important.  Estimates do not include buyer’s premium. Prices achieved include the hammer price plus buyer’s premium up to 25% of the hammer price.

HK0717-374_web                      Lot 374, Janger Dancer – Srihadi Sudarsono

 

Previews open to the public 31 March

Modern and Contemporary Art Evening Sale 2 April from 7pm

Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art Sale 3 April from10 am

The Hong Kong Exhibition and Auction Venue,

Hall 5 Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center (New Wing),

1 Expo Drive, Wan Chai, Hong Kong.

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: Sotheby’s Hong Kong

 

 

WHAT’S NEXT – A Group Art Exhibition

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In recent years the visibility of street art in Bali has grown phenomenally. The dynamic crossover of genres, fusing graffiti with murals, social realism, and ever-evolving sensibilities has become a popular urban youth expression. Outside of conventional modes found in gallery and museums, street art is alive in public spaces, transforming bland street walls.

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From the beach side areas of Canggu and Kuta, to Kerobokan, Denpasar and across the city to Gianyar, colorful style, with plenty of visual WOW is adorning the urban landscape. Its techniques range from murals, to stencil and sticker art, even installations, it’s often saturated with social political issues, dissent, or emotions and ideas about identity and life. This democratic form is being exposed where the public can enjoy its aesthetic qualities, and/or ponder the messages presented.

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Some considered it a nuisance, urban visual pollution, whether perceived as vandalism or public art, it has caught the interest of the international art world, and is even seen as a manner of beautification and urban regeneration. Recently, however street has been making its transition onto the walls of Bali’s art spaces and contemporary galleries.

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Open Friday 17th March at Sika Contemporary Gallery in Ubud, WHAT’S NEXT – A Group Art Exhibition presents a mix of street culture art that is characteristic of this burgeoning movement that’s becoming a highlight of the Indonesian contemporary urban cultural scene.

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Organized by Yogyakarta born, Ubud based multi talented Kemal Ezedine, WHAT’S NEXT features ten artists, nine CRWPX from Jakarta, aged between 24 to 45, most below 30 years. A fresh and exciting array of works on paper, canvas, wood panels, and applied directly to the gallery walls is displayed. During the exhibition the artists present an art bazaar, live graffiti displays and a workshop open to the public.

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“Ubud is well known as a place for tradition art and culture, “WHAT’S NEXT“, is a new annual program for street artists to gain experience in Ubud,” said Ezedine. “Each year it will feature different artists and workshops, along with discussions in a kind informal short residency program.”

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“Bringing the work from the streets and into the gallery space allows a different perspective, and new, often spontaneous creative opportunities,” he adds.   “We trust the artists will learn something, while gaining new knowledge on how they see Ubud as an art center.”

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WHAT’S NEXT

Continues until 20 April
Sika Contemporary Gallery

Jalan Raya Sanggingan No.88X, Ubud

opposite Bintang Supermarket

Tel: 0361 975084

Open daily 9am – 6pm

Words & Images: Richard Horstman