Category Archives: Global Art

Buying Balinese art at auction?

Wayan Radjin "Ramayana Membebaskan Dewi Sita" Image courtesy of LarasatiWayan Radjin – “Ramayana Membebaskan Dewi Sita” Image courtesy of Larasati

 

Are you interested in Balinese art? Ever thought of buying at auction?

Whether driven by your love of art, curiosity, or an eye for investment – buying at auction can be an interesting and exciting way to grow your collection. To the novice auctions may appear intimidating, for aspiring art collectors, however, auctions can provide an excellent point of entry into the marketplace.

Larasati Auctioneers, Indonesia’s oldest international auction house is a dedicated supporter of Balinese art. Specialists in auctioning Balinese traditional art, this year (2018) marks the tweleth year of its Bali auctions, held twice a year in Ubud. Offering an array of collectible items including paintings, sketches, prints and sculptures, their auctions presents good opportunities for buyers with small to medium, and larger budgets.

"Baris" AA Anom Sukawati                                   Baris – Anak Agung Gede Anom Sukawati

 

Here are some tips for the inexperienced on how to buy art during the Larasati Bali sale:

Open for public viewing the items for auction, or lots, are on exhibition from 11am each Friday immediately prior to the auction at Larasati Art Space in Ubud. There will be an array of beautiful art from the Classical paintings to the renowned genres of Balinese modern traditional art, and some modern and contemporary works, on display. Two and a half days allows plenty of time for inspection and to learn more about the works for sale. The free auction catalogue will be your necessary companion to help in this process.

Not only does the catalogue include the details of each lot for sale with the artist’s name, title of the work, medium, size and of course the estimated price of the works market value, it also has the details of how to participate in the auction, along with the necessary pre and post sale procedures. Be sure to read all the fine print. The Larasati website provides information and sales data from past auctions, access to online live bidding, along with the digital auction catalogue. You may wish to do more research about what you intend to buy and the Internet now has more and more information available on Balinese art.

'Sita Satya' Ketut Madra, 103x103cm, Image Richard Horstman                                        Sita Satya – Ketut Madra

Art is very personal, and everyone has different tastes. The secret to buying art that you will enjoy from the first moment you see it, and everyday on the wall at home is to listen to your heart or inner voice. Buying for investment takes know-how. Taking note of your budget is essential, and a buyer’s premium is payable on top of the final sales price of each lot.

On auction day first register your intention to participate and you will receive your paddle with an identification number, which you shall raise to indicate to the auctioneer your wish to bid for a work offered for sale. Understand all the necessary responsibilities you have as a buyer – don’t hesitate to ask questions to the Larasati staff so that you are clear. Inquire if there is a condition report available on the works you are interested in, and knowing more about the works history (previous exhibitions, past sales records, provenance & certificates of authenticity).

Dewa Putu Bedil, 'Harvest Scene', 1980, acrylic on canvas 136x200cm                                  Dewa Putu Bedil – Harvest Scene

 

What can you expect during the auction?

 Auctions move at a swift pace so be attentive and its best to sit at the front of the room. The auctioneer monitors bids from telephone and Internet platforms along with live bidding from people within the room. Auctions become exciting especially when there is spirited competitive bidding quickly raising the prices.

 How does the bidding process work?

The bidding process is straight forward, simply raise your paddle to indicate that you are willing to accept the amount offered by the auctioneer, which will also be indicated on the screen next to the auctioneer in Indonesian Rupiah, American, Singaporean and Hong Kong dollars. The items price will increase by increments and auctioneer will clearly address you, acknowledging they have accepted your bid. Works at auction often sell for prices much lower than that at galleries, or the artist’s studio, yet remember to set a price according to your budget that you are not prepared to go above.

Gusti Nyoamn Lempad, 'The Rickety Bridge' 1940, black ink and pigment on paper.                                Gusti Nyoman Lempad – The Rickety Bridge

 

Hopefully you will succeed in placing the bid accepted as the final sales price that will be confirmed by the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. Congratulations, your diligence has paid off and you have just won the lot. Finally, complete the payment details and organize the delivery of your new art work.

 This exciting experience will fuel your curiosity about buying art. Do your research and learn as much as possible through books and online, visit museums, galleries, artist’s studios, exhibitions, and more auctions. To train your eye immerse yourself in Balinese art – and enjoy.

For the online catalogues and more information about the next Larasati Bali auction early in 2019 please visit: www.larasati.com  

'Mothers Love' Ida Bagus Tilem, wood, 62x13x17cm. Image Richard Horstman                                  Mother’s Love – Ida Bagus Tilem

 

Auctions held at: Larasati Bali Art Space at Tebesaya Gallery,

Jalan Jatayu, Banjar Tebesaya, Peliatan,

Ubud, Bali.

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Courtesy: Larasati Auctioneer’s & Richard Horstman

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ArtJog 2018 attracts important international collectors

"Night with Frank L. Wright" Patricia Untario                             “Night with Frank L. Wright” – Patricia Untario

 

ArtJog, Yogyakarta’s unique and vibrant art fair is celebrating its eleventh instalment. Themed Enlightenment – Towards Various Future, open 4 May – 4 June at the Jogja National Museum, this year it presented more than 100 artworks by 54 national and foreign artists. Since its inception in 2008 ArtJog has grown to represent the voice of Indonesian contemporary art to the global audience, while becoming the premiere event within the Indonesian art infrastructure.

The event continues to grow in stature, attracting more-and-more national and international attendees, while improving its presentation, and artwork quality. ArtJog’s educational platform, the Curators Tours & Meet The Artist programs are an annual highlight, each year reaching new levels of popularity.

ARTJOG 2018_Facade and Opening CrowdThe crowd and exhibition space for the ArtJog commissioned art work by Mulyana Mogus during the event opening at the Jogja National Museum.

 

Artjog has successfully endured its first decade – an important test of time. Now past its infancy and into its teenage years the event’s brand consciousness becomes increasingly essential.  “It is not only the event publications and marketing that are important in the promotion of ArtJog, yet also the fair’s content. And this is the most challenging aspect,” said ArtJog Director Heri Pemad, when asked how ArtJog can evolve, becoming increasingly vital and important during the oncoming decade.

“The strength of the ArtJog exhibition themes, highlighting topics of discussion that we wish to raise are increasingly essential in order to attract top class Indonesian and international artists, along with the public’s attention. We need to continually focus upon issues that are globally relevant,” Pemad stated.

"Preserverance 3 series" By Hendra "Blankon"Priyadhani                        “Preserverance 3 Series” –  Hendra “Blankon” Priyadhani

 

This year the event attracted important international collectors, including the Filipino husband and wife duo Lito and Kim Camacho, who recently made their first visit to Central Java to attend ArtJog, and other events held within the region as a part of the Jogja Art Weeks (JAW) program.

“We are astonished by both the city of Yogyakarta and ArtJog,” said Kim Camacho, who along with Lito has accumulated one of the most impressive private art collections in the Southeast Asian region. Influential and visionary, they are renowned for being prolific collectors, with a unique eye for quality, identifying artists and works before they gain popularity.

ARTJOG 2018_Commission Work_Sea Remembers by Mulyana The undersea installation “Sea Remembers” by Bandung artist Mulyana Mogus

 

The Camacho’s first collected Gutai artists, a dynamic Japanese post-war contemporary art movement, well before they became recognized, and were quick to pay special attention to Yayoi Kusama. They began buying art in 1980 and their collection, which started with Filipino genre art, then grew to include Filipino masters and other Southeast Asian art, has evolved into a truly international assortment. “Collecting art in the Philippines is a much older tradition than in other Southeast Asian countries,“ said Lito, who was quoted as saying that ‘he and his wife prefer artists who are global in importance, and who have a place in art history’.

“Given that it is an artist based event, ArtJog is incredibly well-organized, featuring excellent presentation, along with artworks of high quality,” Kim said, and continued, “We are amazed by the number of artists and art communities that have thrived in Yogyakarta, and the standard of exhibitions we have visited during the Jogja Art Weeks program.

ARTJOG 2018_Curatorial Tour                             ArtJog Curatorial Tour hosted by Ignatia Nilu

 

“Attracting important international collectors adds increased credibility to the ArtJog brand,” Heri Pemad stated. “Its not only proof of our success, yet we need them to help promote our brand to a larger audience, and to entice more collectors from other countries to attend ArtJog. It is important that new international buyers not only collect the artworks, yet also gain greater appreciation for the wealth of Indonesian art, culture and history.”

“We have purchased many pieces during our visit to Yogyakarta,” said Kim Camacho. “Works that speak to us, not just as unique Indonesian contemporary art works, yet works that are relevant within the global context.”

Art work by Kexin Zhang                          Art work by invited Chinese artist Kexin Zhang

 

“We were captured by the beauty of Night with Frank L. Wright, at ArtJog, by Jakarta based artist Patricia Untario, and purchased her artwork. We were also very impressed by the JAW exhibition Bakaba #7Zaman Now by the Sakato Art Community. Outside of the event we loved the rich textural works by senior artist Aming Prayitno. We have recently collected a work by Yogyakarta artist Eddie Prabandono, and our first Indonesian purchases are works by the Balinese contemporary master Made Wianta,” Kim stated, and continued, “Indonesian art is incredibly under priced for works of such excellent quality.”

Other important collectors who attended ArtJog include the President & CEO of Time International, Irwan Danny Mussry, Dr. Oei Hong Djien of the OHD Museum in Magelang, Haryanto Adikoesoema, the founder of Jakarta’s new international standard museum, MACAN, and Iwan Lukminto who recently opened the new Tumurun Museum in Solo, Central Java.

ARTJOG 2018_Daily Performance_Rianto                           One of the daily performances at ArtJog by Rianto

 

flowerAThe Japanese Garden – Interactive installation by Japanese performance artist Hiromi Tango

 

kidA         A child engages with The Japanese Garden – Image by Ayu Mandala

 

 

ArtJog – Enlightenment

Continuing through to 4 June 2018

Daily from 9am – 5pm

Jogja National Museum

Jalan Prof. Ki Amri Yahya No. 1, Yogyakarta

www.artjog.co.id

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Coutesy of ArtJog & Richard Horstman

 

 

Bali’s GWK Statue completed after almost three decades

Image courtesy PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

The epic tale of the Garuda Wisnu statue at the Garuda Wisnu Kencana (GWK) Cultural Park in Jimbaran, South Bali will soon reach its finale. In a monumental saga that stretches back to its conceptualisation in 1989, including the on and off progress of its construction, the sculptures creator, Balinese artist Nyoman Nuarta, has confirmed the project will be completed in early August.

“By the 4th of August this extraordinary combination of art, technology and science will be complete,” Nuarta recently announced. “This nation will have a new cultural icon, that, despite taking more than 28 years, and without help from the Indonesian governement, showes that private sector can contribute greatly to the nation and state. It is a special gift to celebrate the nation’s Independence Day on the 17 August, 2018,” added Indonesia’s most celebrated sculptor.

GWK Image courtesy PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

Originally scheduled for completion in March 2019, in mid 2017 Nuarta was given a new deadline by the Indonesian government. The statue, which is the second tallest in the world, must be finished before October 2018 when IMF and World Bank delegates converge on Bali for their annual meetings to be held 8 -14 October. As a part of their itinerary a dinner will be held for the delegates at the GWK Festival Park, a vast field surrounded by limestone cliffs, within the sprawling 60-hectare cultural park.

In April a special ceremony officiated by the Governor of Bali, Mangku Pastika celebrated the installation of the statue’s 529th module, the Mahkota Dewa Wisnu – the 3.5-ton crown of Wisnu that is covered with gold-platted mosaics. A total of 754 modules of the statues outer skin, made of copper and brass sheeting, each weighing on average 800 kilograms, complete the installation.

Photo courtey PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

The project has occupied as many as 120 experienced wielders working on site to re-assemble the modules before they are lifted up by two cranes and bolted onto the outer steel frame of the statue by workers who specialize in high altitude construction. “During the initial stages of the statues design there was no available technique to enlarge the difficult and complicated three-dimensional forms, nor was there any computer software that could do this,” Nuarta said. “Therefore, I had to find the solution to the problem. Finally, in 1991 we found a theory, and along with the birth of Autocad software we could move forward.”

Rigorous scientific integrity testing has been undertaken on all the construction materials and the statue itself, even taking earthquake resistance into account with the pedestal being able to withstand up to 8 on the Richter scale. Wind tunnel tests have indicated the statue, the largest in Indonesia, could withstand winds speeds of up to 259 nautical miles per hour.

side elevation GWK statue - image courtesy PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

Standing 121 meters at the top of the Ungasan ridge, 271 meters above sea level and with a wingspan of 64 meters, the skin surface area of the statue reaches two and a half hectares or 25,000 m2, during the evening the statue will be a unique feature of the cultural park with its special lighting arrangement that was built-in Singapore. The statue will sit on a pedestal, or building base, which will function as a restaurant serving up to 500 people. There will also be a museum and a viewing gallery that will allow panoramic vistas of the rest of South Bali.

“The target is to attract 6,000 tourists per day,” Nuarta said, then continued. “Hopefully, Garuda Wisnu Kencana will serve as a reminder to Indonesians and the international audience, throughout this divisive period about our cultural roots as a tolerant and multicultural nation.”

Image Courtesy of PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviewing ART|JOG|10

"Fashion As A Weapon" Hendra 'Blankon' Priyadhani. Image Richard Horstman             Fashion As A Weapon, 2017 – Hendra “Blangkon” Priyadhani

How may we define Indonesian art?

Unlike other nations, Indonesia is without an international standard museum as a foundation through which its distinct art narratives and identity may be imparted internationally, and locally. We can, however, reference a different platform ART|JOG, the art fair that supports artists over galleries. Celebrating this year its tenth edition, it has grown into an icon, presenting the ‘voice’ of Indonesian contemporary art diversity to the global audience.

ART|JOG|10 Changing Perspective opened with a limited preview 19 May, at the Jogja National Museum (JNM), Yogyakarta, officiated by GKR Mangkubumi, the eldest child of Yogyakarta Governor Sultan Hamengkubuwono. Annually the event attracts additional foreign visitors, this year there were more international art industry insiders, many expressing ideas about future collaborations.

Mulyana Mogus "Silent Prayers"                         Silent Prayers, 2017 – Mulyana Mogus

Running parallel with Jogja Art Weeks, a month-long abundance of events set throughout the Special Regency, and now in its second year, (another organizational feat by Heri Pemad Art Management), ART|JOG is a fixture on the international art map, a boon for cultural tourism in Central Java.

“The combination of an art fair founded for artists by an artist, hosted at the Jogja National Museum, over a relaxed time frame with daily performances and artist interactivity against a backdrop of the uniquely engaging energy of the Yogyakarta arts community is highly inspiring in a world where art fair fatigue is prevalent,” said artists, art historian, curator, gallerist and collector Jane Walker, who is London and Singapore based, also on her first visit to the fair.

ART|JOG|10’s Open Call Application granted fifteen artists eligibility, while invited artists numbered 58 of a total of 73. One of the most enjoyable features of its format is the freedom to observe works without any presence/pressure of sales, gallery staff, and infrastructure.

J Aryadhitya Pramuhendra - Holy Lamb               Holy Lamb, 2017 – J Aryahitya Pramuhendra

Both local and foreign, emerging and established artists exhibit side-by-side over 3 floors. The JNM’s design of alternative shaped showrooms offers possibilities for varying art encounters. Artists granted individual space, who understood how to capitalize upon this creating intimate art experiences, were generally the most memorable.

A giant batik parasol depicting the sky spans the ceiling and a mural rendered in clay revealing order and disorder are the two prominent features of Seti Legu’s installation, Universal Syndrome. Observers are immersed within an intriguing reconstruction of opposing positive and negative forces – the world according to Javanese cosmology – where human and environmental exploitation contrasts with ideology, religion and materialism; the modern world in conflict with the past. Legu sits and reads poetry aloud, while a traditionally attired elderly musician completes the distinctive ambience.

Invited Chinese artist Geng Xue presents a 13-minute animation, Mr Sea. Her two characters, set within a surreal forest landscape are all made from porcelain. In this extraordinarily sensitive tale, that takes the art form to wonderful innovative heights, breath-taking beauty and tragedy go hand-in-hand. This is a mesmerizing, emotional journey.

"Mr. Sea" Geng Xue, 13 minute porcelain animation. Image Richard Horstman                                Mr. Sea, 2014 – Geng Xue

Syagini Ratna Wulan’s Chromatic Chimera, and Chromatic Myth 1,2&3 together create a tangible atmosphere. Her ‘gloomy’ skyscapes feature tiny colored ‘figures’ floating seemingly without purpose. A hanging geometric form projected with colored light creates beautiful patterns up into a corner, its energetic distinctions, married with her painted compositions create a potent, mysterious abstract experience. While other artists exhibit abstract works, many fail to excite, Wulan’s imagination, however fully engages our senses via the subtle powers of suggestion.

Season In The Abyss, Jim Allen Abel’s commemorative installation honoring 102 people lost in 2007 on an Adam Air flight from Surabaya, East Java to Manado is thought provoking, and ultimately touching. At front a display case presents facts and details including archive photos. Within the darkened space the installation merges elements, projected images, and flashing lights reflect upon mirrors from the ceiling to the floor, and wall. The experience is intriguing and upsetting, yet beautiful as well. Such a thematic is bold, revealing artistic maturity.

ArtJog 10 Merchandise Project - Wearable Art. Scarf by Radi Arwinda, Image by Richard Horstman       ArtJog 10 Merchandise Project – Wearable Art, Scarf by Radi Arwinda

Angki Purbandono collaborated with adventure traveller/actor and advocate for the preservation of Indonesia’s endangered Sumatran elephant, Nicholas Saputra, to make a documentary describing the alarming decline of this specie. Post Jungle – Tangkahan Project introduces an alternative story, in a visual art language aimed to incite the public’s curiosity and concern towards grave Indonesian environmental issues.

Floating Eyes, the commissioned work by Wedhar Riyadi of giant eyeballs floating in water is spectacular. Positioned at the front façade of JNM, evening time it contrasts wonderfully against the white building and the night sky, in the presence of the new, honorary R.J Katamsi statue, flanked by majestic banyan trees. The work, however, lacks local iconography.

Some other works of note include J Aryadhitya Pramuhendra’s Holy Lamb, Mulyana Mogus’ beguiling visual world, Silent Prayers, Agung Prabowo’s linocut reduction print on handmade paper, Study of Convex and Concave by M.C Escher 1955, and Hendra “Blangkon” Priyadhani’s, Fashion As A Weapon. Recipients of this year’s Young Artists Award, a program open to artists under 33 years in appreciation of artistic endeavour are Bagus Pandega and Syaiful Garibaldi.

Indonesian artists, including Wedhar Riyadi, along with art lovers, with "Floating Eyes" JNM. Image Richard HorstmanIndonesian artists, including Wedhar Riyadi, center, along with art lovers, with “Floating Eyes”, Riyadi’s commissioned work.

The popular Fringe Program, headlined by the Curator’s Tour, Meet The Artists, and the ASRI Historical Tour, enhanced the public’s engagement. This year’s new Merchandise Project presents selected local creative communities and artists to showcase their signature works. The strong line-up of Daily Performances including performance art, music, dance, fashion shows and theatre, featured well-known artists Melati Suryodharmo, Garin Nugroho and Rahayu Supanggah, Bimo Wiwohatmo and Astri Kusuma Wardani.

Post preview consensus was, however, the quality of art was down from 2016. “The works were less innovative and less challenging this year compared to last,” said art critic Jean Couteau. “While the local component was minor, the visual and symbolic language is global.”

A deacade of ART|JOG is a huge distinction. Such an event faces great challenges, both internal and external. The vision of Heri Pemad, along with the vigor of Heri Pemad Art Management deserves enormous credit. Indonesia, and the global art world please take note!

20170519_130530                        Universal Syndrome, 2017 – Seti Legu

20170519_125340                             Angki Purbandono, 2017

20170519_131058                Situ Ciburuy; Museum Plan, 2017  – Aliansyah Chaniago

20170519_132125                  Season In The Abyss, 2017 – Jim Allen Abel

20170519_134058                  On the Way, 2017 – “SurantoKenyang

 

ART|JOG|10

19 May – 19 June 2017

Jogja National Museum

Jalan Prof. Ki Amri Yahya No. 1, Yogyakarta

www.artjog.co.id

Words & Images: Richard Horstman

 

 

How Can Global Art Survive a Dystopian Future?

sothebys-auction-scene_modern-and-contemporary-asian-art-evening-sale-image-coutesy-sothebysSotheby’s Hong Kong during the Autumn 2016 Sale of Southeast Asian Art

 

As Art Stage Singapore, South East Asia’s flagship art fair, prepares itself for its seventh installment on the 12-15 January 2017 at Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Center, the Founder & President, Lorenzo Rudolf has made some notable observations.

Responsible for creating the model of what the majority of art fairs are today Lorenzo’s decade of innovative leadership at Art Basel transformed it from a minor art fair to the world leader. Along the way he introduced special packaged tours for VIP’s, corporate sponsorship, and supported emerging artists, plus all the glitz, glamour, money and quality art. In 2010 he founded Art Stage Singapore, a key international event with a specific focus on promoting and fostering Asian art.

In the November Art Stage Singapore 2017 media release that outlines the program highlights of the annual event, Lorenzo presents an analysis of the current global political and economic situation with regards to the future of the performance of the art market.

“As the performance of art markets is inextricably linked to the health of the economy, maintaining the same market positions is unrealistic in the current economic climate,” states Lorenzo, then points out, “Never has it been more urgent for us to re-examine the role of contemporary art in our societies than it is today. Against the backdrop of the weak global economy and changed political landscapes, art fairs such as Art Stage Singapore must re-think our role.”

art-stage-jakarta-2016_general-fair-view-2-jpg-image-courtesy-of-art-stage-jakarta-2016                                               Art Stage Jakarta 2016

To galvanize this ‘re-think’, Lorenzo is calling upon ‘visionaries, leaders, thinkers, and socially engaged actors’ to act in a role of ‘seismographs and disruptors’. This would seem to indicate that the time has come for a major change in the model and mindset of the art market, and that a much more innovative system is required. How this could happen may be directly tied into the 2017 Southeast Asian Forum, which is being hosted by Art Stage Singapore, with its focus being the theme of art investment, entitled Net Present Value: Art, Capital, Futures.

‘Net Present Value’ is a method used to forecast the profitability of future returns on investments made today. Nobody wants to lose money on an investment, so the Forum seeks to explore the value of art, imagination and progress in different ways. In creating the Forum as a platform for exchange and as a think tank, Lorenzo is reaching out to society’s critical and visionary thinkers, believing they can contribute meaningfully to provide solutions to maintain the financial value of art, by expanding on its other values.

In the last twenty years many potent creative minds in the art world have increased art’s economic model to where it is today, bigger, more successful, with more major collectors than at any other time in its history. But take away the tax breaks, and this grand edifice propped up on solid pillars, seems to be built upon seismic ground that appears ready to shake.

huge-crowds-at-bazaar-art-jakarta-2016-image-courtesy-baj-2016                                            Bazaar Art Jakarta 2016

Art always survives because it has a real value that is composed of many parts, though often these parts are in conflict with one another. What the ‘Visionaries’ that Lorenzo is seeking need to have is the ability to rearrange these components into a working system that gives benefits for all. They do this by seeing a multiple over-lapping system of systems, presented in a dynamic game plan of stages.

There has always been a danger that when too many like-minded people come together, the thinking tends to remain inside ‘the like-minded box’. Finding the different thinkers outside our networks can be tricky, unless the focus is on how to link ideas to ideas. To do this we need to spread our message wider. For this, there exists a connection between Visionaries, Organizers and the Media. The first dream up a radically different state; the second knows how to make the dream a new reality, while the third can link them together to create a viral change of attitudes and responses.

Visionaries are unique because they don’t see the world like everyone else and possess the ability to find a way forward. Organizers recognize potential, they can take good ideas and arrange them in the right order, with an eye for a market. The Media exists to find out what is happening, and to tell others about it. It connects with many types of people, each with their own stories or ideas to tell, and spreads the word in an instant.

To make a new paradigm shift in the art market would mean creating more varied models and methods. Available from the Internet are peer-to-peer linking, block chains and Bio-mimicry systems for finance. The emergence between traditional organized art events, together with large-scale all tickets sold installation events with virtual and interactive platforms offers exciting novel experiential possibilities. If global art can introduce successful innovative changes it could pave the way for other much-needed exponential growth miracles.

20170113_145341Southeast Asia Forum Discussion: Art & Money – A Dangerous Liaison? 13 January 2017, featuring panelists (from left) Alain Servais (Investment banker, entrepreneur & collector, Brussels), Lorenzo Rudolf (Founder & President Art Stage Singapore & Jakarta) and Dr. Franz Schultheis (Professor of Sociology, University of St. Gallen, Switerland and co author of the When Art Meets Money a study into the Art Basel art fairs).

 

PATH FORWARD

Art Stage Singapore seems to have stated its intention to begin a process of reinvention. By providing a forum for ‘visionaries, leaders, thinkers, and socially engaged actors’, combined with its own business acumen, it has the drive to set the wheels in motion.

New solutions are on the horizon, with a potential emphasis on presentation in a more immersive art experience, setting the stage as a stimulator for sales. By changing the mechanisms of the market, it is possible to not only maintain current returns, but to even increase growth with a broader clientele. Periphery programs may also need to alter, taking note from the success of the ‘presentation generation’ and themed workshops aimed to achieve specific objectives. The greater the event, the more it inspires the imagination of the collectors, art industry, critics, and the general public. We are aiming for an all-encompassing, immersive art park experience that invigorates exchanges of ideas, concepts, innovations and finance.

Can Art Stage Singapore lead the way? The stakes have never seemed higher and the timing is just right. The Forum will be an important milestone in the analysis of the current malaise of a troubled world, especially as the most significant dynamic shifts are generally derived from an adjustment of attitude. In raising the flag and making a clarion call, Lorenzo has sent the word out. What remains now is to link the like-minded to the ‘unlikely-minded’, so that history can be made.

Words: Richard Horstman, Soemantri Widagdo & anonymous