Category Archives: Balinese Modern Art

the curious worlds of Balinese painter Galung Wiratmaja

  Tari-persembahan-150x120cm-2019-ac-on-canvas                           Tari  Persembahan, 2019 – Galung Wiratmaja

 

Intrigue and mystery are powerful psychological elements when effectively utilized within a painting. The ability to make subtle suggestions in a composition that inspire curiosity and ignite the observer’s imagination reflects a painter who is in full control of his canvas.

Colour and form are the potent visual fundamentals of a painting that we respond to – they are the fundamentals that inform our conscious and subconscious minds. We then recognize colours and shapes and immediately make associations with objects in our surrounding world. On the deeper, subconscious level, colour and form are distinct vibrational codes that resonate with our inner architecture and core.

Walau-abstrak-teruslah-150x120cm-2016-ac-on-canvas                         Walau Abstrak Teruslah, 2019 – Galung Wiratmaja

 

Balinese modern artist Made Galung Wiratmaja understands how to create captivating paintings – compositions that balance colour with form to catch the eye and incite fascination. Over the past two decades he has explored the abstract, abstraction and figurative expressionistic painting styles. Abstraction paintings reveal a very simple and incomplete depiction of form, abstract compositions, on the other hand, are in descript arrangements of colour and unknown shapes that are without any physical references that we recognize.

I love painting – I find it such a fascinating and inspirational force. Yet a painting is simply some paint applied to a two-dimensional surface, be it a compelling composition of technical mastery, or an expression that requires little time and skill to complete. What sparks my curiosity is how easily our minds are led, and how quickly we believe in the painted illusions that appear before our eyes. As Picasso once said, “Art is a lie, that makes us realize the truth.”

Galung Wiratmaja - AmbangGalung Wiratmaja at ARMA with his paintings in the 2018 exhibition “Ambang Embang”

 

In “Ambang Embang”, a 2018 group exhibition at the Agung Rai Museum of Art (ARMA), in Ubud, Galung exhibited three abstractions of the Lingga, an upright object symbolizing fertility and representing the phallus of the Hindu god Shiva. Entitled “Totem #1,2 & 3” his compositions ‘evolve’ within a sequential series that wonderfully suggest the shoulders and head of the human body. His use of colour, shape and line imply enough decipherable information for our mind to make immediate associations.

“Facing Reality” Galung’s recent solo exhibition, open 5 March – 6 May at The Oberoi, Seminyak and presented by Indonesian Fine Art, features nine figurative expressionistic paintings. In these works the artist combines an array of human figures positioned, mostly, with their backs to the observer, seemingly peering into the colourful abstract backgrounds. His unusual compositions immediately incite appeal, and we wonder what his figures are indeed doing, and what is it the artist wishes to say.

ORLA-(orang-lama)-150x110cm-2106-ac-on-canvas                           ORLA (orang lama), 2016 – Galung Wiratmaja

 

In “Founding Father”, Indonesia’s first President, Sukarno is the focal subject, while one work features a large group of people, and in another appears a Balinese family in traditional attire. What is particularly alluring is that his figures are not facing and addressing the audience. They are in interrelationships with unfamiliar backgrounds and this conjures up within us many different responses.

“I enjoy making compositions that feature mysterious elements and that provoke the audience’s imagination. I want that observers to discover their own interpretations – all readings are valid,” the artist says. “In the compositions depicting Balinese people I make identity statements of what it means to be Balinese, and of the two worlds in which we inhabit.”

Angel-40x50cm-2019-ac-on-canvas1                                      Angel, 2019 – Galung Wiratmaja

 

The paintings reveal two contrasting visual realities according to the Balinese understanding of sekala/niskala – the seen, and unseen worlds. In the realm of sekala is all that is of the physical form, while the niskala is the non-physical, spiritual world consisting of the gods, ancestors and nature spirits. Balance is the key to Galung’s choice of colours that are a mixture of subdued ochre’s, greens, browns and greys that create interesting and unusual contrasts. They are never over powering. “My colours reflect my personality, not too bright, yet not too dark,” he says with a smile.

“Tari Persembahan” (Dance Tribute) depicting four Balinese Legong dancers is an exhibition highlight. The figures Galung generally depicts are stationary, appearing rigid, in a type of silent contemplation, in a departure of style his Legong dancers blend and harmonize within a field of vibrant motion, and the composition has a distinct visual tension.

Totem #1, 2018 Galung Wiratmaja                                    Totem #1, 2018 – Galung Wiratmaja

 

“Often while painting my mind becomes detached from the creative process,” the painter says. “My hand guides the brush without me being conscious and compositions mysteriously appear before my eyes. At times I work with a clear concept in mind, and others times not. The outcomes are always surprising, and harmonic.”

About five years ago Galung’s works really caught my attention. Born in 1972 in Sukawati, GIanyar, he studied Fine Art at Udayana University in Denpasar and started painting at the age of thirteen. To his distinction Galung has succeeded in creating his own signature style. He certainly deserves recognition and increased exposure.

Founding-father-65x80cm-2019-ac-on-canvas2                               Founding Father, 2019 – Galung Wiratmaja

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: Richard Horstman & Indonesian Fine Art

 

 

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Previewing the Larasati Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art Auction in Ubud, 16 Febuary 2019

Ketut Teja Astawa "Untitled"                                       Untitled – Ketut Teja Astawa

 

Balinese contemporary artist Ketut Teja Astawa (b.1971) has experimented with the iconography from the Classical Balinese Kamasan paintings for more than twenty years. He reinterprets the imagery with his own innovations configuring wonderful compositions, often humorous, and with a strong sense of spontaneity. His signature style has become one of the most recognizable, and important recent developments in Balinese contemporary art.

Untitled, Lot 555, by Astawa, with an estimated price of between Rp 30 – 40 million, is just one of 77 items of fine art for sale in the upcoming Larasati Traditional, Modern & Contemporary Art auction on Saturday 16 February at the Larasati Art Space in Ubud, Bali.

Nyoman Kayun "Keluarga di Desa"                                       Keluarga di Desa – Nyoman Kayun

 

In an array of media including sketches in ink on paper, watercolour, gouache and aquarelle works on paper, acrylic and oil paintings on canvas, colour prints, and a lithograph, the auction features works by distinguished Balinese and international artists including Gusti Nyoman Lempad, Ida Bagus Made Poleng, Gusti Ketut Kobot, Nyoman Gunarsa, Arie Smit, Miguel Covarrubias and Donald Friend. The sale has buying opportunities for beginners, as well as seasoned connoisseurs, and mid level collectors.

Two of the highlights are Lot 513, Outriggers Bali by the renowned Australian artist and diarist who lived in Bali from 1968 until1980, Donald Friend (1914 – 1989). This striking 47 x 63 cm pen, ink, gouache and gold leaf composition on paper featuring 3 traditional sailing boats on the ocean comes with an estimated price of between Rp 85 – 95 million. Village Scene in Batuan, 1968, Lot 541, is a vibrant, playful composition by one of the most popular Batuan traditional painters, Ida Bagus Made Widja (1912-1992). This 42 x 82.5 acrylic on canvas work with dynamic coloration has an estimated price of between Rp 65 – 80 million.

Donald Friend "Outriggers Bali"                                      Outriggers Bali – Donald Friend

 

For new collectors with smaller budgets the following works offer good entry points into the market, especially if purchased within their estimated prices. Dasa Muka, Lot 525 is an excellent composition featuring mythological characters from the Balinese religious narratives by Gusti Nyoman Moleh and comes with an estimated price Rp 12 – 15 million. Lot 526, Bima ke Suarga Loka by the renowned painter of the unconventional Dewa Putu Mokoh (1913 – 2010) comes with an estimated price of between Rp 15 – 20 million, and Lot 559 Balinese Temple, by Kartika Affandi (b. 1934), the daughter of Indonesia’s first modern master Affandi (1907 – 1990) which has an estimated value of between Rp 14 – 18 million.

The following works will capture the attention of connoisseurs of Balinese traditional art. Nyoman Kayun (b. 1954) is considered one of the last living masters of the Ubud School of traditional painting and his compositions often depict old oral traditional folktales that are transmitted verbally through songs. Lot 520, Keluarga di Desa by Kayun has an estimated price of between Rp 35 – 45 million and comes with good provenance. Gembala Sapi. Lot 523 by Wayan Radjin (b.1945) the son of the celebrated Batuan artist Made Djata (1920 – 2001) has an estimated price of between Rp 55 – 75 million.

541                               Village Scene in BatuanIda Bagus Made Widja

 

Ida Bagus Made Poleng (1915-1999) was born in the village of Tebesaya, Ubud and was considered the finest of all of the Balinese traditional painters. His paintings, which he referred to as ‘his children’, are in high demand. Lot 524 Mandi di Pancuran, a 49 x 32 cm acrylic on canvas composition depicting two men bathing has an estimated price of between Rp 130 – 180 million. In charming, glowing reddish tones, Lot 543, Nonton Wayang by Ida Bagus Made Nadera (1915 – 1998) features a crowd of villagers watching a wayang kulit performance and comes with an estimated price of between Rp. 30 – 40 million.

An unusual item on offer, Lot 510, Rice Granary, Bali, a 36 x 28cm lithograph by Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias (1904 -1957) comes with good provenance. Covarrubias was a gifted caricaturist and illustrator who wrote the landmark 1937 cultural and social study on Bali, Island of Bali. This work has with an estimated price of between Rp 10 – 13 million.

Ida Bagus Made Nadera," Nonton Wayang", 95x125cm, acrylic on canvas. - Copy                          Nonton WayangIda Bagus Made Nadera

 

Buying art as an investment is possible with the right strategy and this includes purchasing and holding a work for at least 10 – 20 years before selling. Three opportunities are available in the genre of Balinese contemporary art, including the aforementioned Lot 555, by Teja Astawa. Made Palguna has also developed his own ‘voice’ that is distinct within the sphere of Balinese contemporary art. Lot 553, Mencari Orang-orang Marjinal, 2003 by Palguna comes with an estimated price of between Rp 18 – 24 million. The final item for auction, Lot 577, comprises of two paintings, a. Energiku Bertambah, 2003, 70 x 70 cm & b. Malam Bergelora, 2001, 26 x 30 cm, by the iconic Balinese female artist IGAK Murniasih (1966-2006) who raised issues of sexuality, identity and gender politics in her works. These provocative paintings have an estimated price of between Rp 35 – 45 million.

There are many other strong works available in this auction, two are by the renowned traditional painter Gusti Ketut Kobot (1917-1999 Pengosekan, Ubud), Lot 531 Jatayu and Lot 527, Scene from Rajapala Story, while Lot 528, The Witch and the Servant, an ink on paper sketch by Gusti Nyoman Lempad has excellent provenance. For collectors interested in Indonesian modern art there are good works available by artists Widayat, Soedarso and Soedibio.

527                             Scene from Rajapala Story – Gusti Ketut Kobot

 

Potential buyers bidding over the phone, absentee bidders or real-time Internet bidders who are unable to attend the previews days or auction are advised to contact Larasati and enquire about the colour reproduction accuracy of the images contained within the online catalogue to ensure that what they wish to purchase can be realistically appraised. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue description does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections, therefore condition reports of the works, outlining the paintings current state and whether it has repairs or over painting, are available upon request.

Provenance, the historical data of the works previous owner/s is also important and is provided. An information guide including before the auction, during the auction and after the auction details, including conditions of business, the bidding process, payment, storage and insurance, and shipping of the work is also available. A buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer of each lot at rate of 22% of the hammer price of the lot.

Dewa Putu Mokoh "Bima ke Suarga Loka"                             Bima ke Suarga Loka Dewa Putu Mokoh

 

Open to the public at the Larasati Art Space in the Tebesaya Gallery the auction starts at 2:30 pm Saturday 16 February, while viewing begins from 11am Thursday. The online catalogue, complete with a guide for prospective buyers is available at: www.larasati.com

 

Ida Bagus Made - "Mandi di Pancuran"                          Mandi di Pancuran – Ida Bagus Made Poleng

 

 

Viewing:

Thursday,         14 February   11am – 7.30pm

Friday,              15 January     11am – 7.30pm

Saturday,         16 January     11am – 1pm

Auction: Saturday 16 February, from 2:30 pm

Larasati Bali Art Space at Tebesaya Gallery

Jalan Jatayu, Banjar Tebesaya, Peliatan,

Ubud, Gianyar Bali, Indonesia

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Courtesy: Larasati Auctioneers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buying Balinese art at auction?

Wayan Radjin "Ramayana Membebaskan Dewi Sita" Image courtesy of LarasatiWayan Radjin – “Ramayana Membebaskan Dewi Sita” Image courtesy of Larasati

 

Are you interested in Balinese art? Ever thought of buying at auction?

Whether driven by your love of art, curiosity, or an eye for investment – buying at auction can be an interesting and exciting way to grow your collection. To the novice auctions may appear intimidating, for aspiring art collectors, however, auctions can provide an excellent point of entry into the marketplace.

Larasati Auctioneers, Indonesia’s oldest international auction house is a dedicated supporter of Balinese art. Specialists in auctioning Balinese traditional art, this year (2018) marks the tweleth year of its Bali auctions, held twice a year in Ubud. Offering an array of collectible items including paintings, sketches, prints and sculptures, their auctions presents good opportunities for buyers with small to medium, and larger budgets.

"Baris" AA Anom Sukawati                                   Baris – Anak Agung Gede Anom Sukawati

 

Here are some tips for the inexperienced on how to buy art during the Larasati Bali sale:

Open for public viewing the items for auction, or lots, are on exhibition from 11am each Friday immediately prior to the auction at Larasati Art Space in Ubud. There will be an array of beautiful art from the Classical paintings to the renowned genres of Balinese modern traditional art, and some modern and contemporary works, on display. Two and a half days allows plenty of time for inspection and to learn more about the works for sale. The free auction catalogue will be your necessary companion to help in this process.

Not only does the catalogue include the details of each lot for sale with the artist’s name, title of the work, medium, size and of course the estimated price of the works market value, it also has the details of how to participate in the auction, along with the necessary pre and post sale procedures. Be sure to read all the fine print. The Larasati website provides information and sales data from past auctions, access to online live bidding, along with the digital auction catalogue. You may wish to do more research about what you intend to buy and the Internet now has more and more information available on Balinese art.

'Sita Satya' Ketut Madra, 103x103cm, Image Richard Horstman                                        Sita Satya – Ketut Madra

Art is very personal, and everyone has different tastes. The secret to buying art that you will enjoy from the first moment you see it, and everyday on the wall at home is to listen to your heart or inner voice. Buying for investment takes know-how. Taking note of your budget is essential, and a buyer’s premium is payable on top of the final sales price of each lot.

On auction day first register your intention to participate and you will receive your paddle with an identification number, which you shall raise to indicate to the auctioneer your wish to bid for a work offered for sale. Understand all the necessary responsibilities you have as a buyer – don’t hesitate to ask questions to the Larasati staff so that you are clear. Inquire if there is a condition report available on the works you are interested in, and knowing more about the works history (previous exhibitions, past sales records, provenance & certificates of authenticity).

Dewa Putu Bedil, 'Harvest Scene', 1980, acrylic on canvas 136x200cm                                  Dewa Putu Bedil – Harvest Scene

 

What can you expect during the auction?

 Auctions move at a swift pace so be attentive and its best to sit at the front of the room. The auctioneer monitors bids from telephone and Internet platforms along with live bidding from people within the room. Auctions become exciting especially when there is spirited competitive bidding quickly raising the prices.

 How does the bidding process work?

The bidding process is straight forward, simply raise your paddle to indicate that you are willing to accept the amount offered by the auctioneer, which will also be indicated on the screen next to the auctioneer in Indonesian Rupiah, American, Singaporean and Hong Kong dollars. The items price will increase by increments and auctioneer will clearly address you, acknowledging they have accepted your bid. Works at auction often sell for prices much lower than that at galleries, or the artist’s studio, yet remember to set a price according to your budget that you are not prepared to go above.

Gusti Nyoamn Lempad, 'The Rickety Bridge' 1940, black ink and pigment on paper.                                Gusti Nyoman Lempad – The Rickety Bridge

 

Hopefully you will succeed in placing the bid accepted as the final sales price that will be confirmed by the fall of the auctioneer’s hammer. Congratulations, your diligence has paid off and you have just won the lot. Finally, complete the payment details and organize the delivery of your new art work.

 This exciting experience will fuel your curiosity about buying art. Do your research and learn as much as possible through books and online, visit museums, galleries, artist’s studios, exhibitions, and more auctions. To train your eye immerse yourself in Balinese art – and enjoy.

For the online catalogues and more information about the next Larasati Bali auction early in 2019 please visit: www.larasati.com  

'Mothers Love' Ida Bagus Tilem, wood, 62x13x17cm. Image Richard Horstman                                  Mother’s Love – Ida Bagus Tilem

 

Auctions held at: Larasati Bali Art Space at Tebesaya Gallery,

Jalan Jatayu, Banjar Tebesaya, Peliatan,

Ubud, Bali.

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Courtesy: Larasati Auctioneer’s & Richard Horstman

Bali’s GWK Statue completed after almost three decades

Image courtesy PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

The epic tale of the Garuda Wisnu statue at the Garuda Wisnu Kencana (GWK) Cultural Park in Jimbaran, South Bali will soon reach its finale. In a monumental saga that stretches back to its conceptualisation in 1989, including the on and off progress of its construction, the sculptures creator, Balinese artist Nyoman Nuarta, has confirmed the project will be completed in early August.

“By the 4th of August this extraordinary combination of art, technology and science will be complete,” Nuarta recently announced. “This nation will have a new cultural icon, that, despite taking more than 28 years, and without help from the Indonesian governement, showes that private sector can contribute greatly to the nation and state. It is a special gift to celebrate the nation’s Independence Day on the 17 August, 2018,” added Indonesia’s most celebrated sculptor.

GWK Image courtesy PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

Originally scheduled for completion in March 2019, in mid 2017 Nuarta was given a new deadline by the Indonesian government. The statue, which is the second tallest in the world, must be finished before October 2018 when IMF and World Bank delegates converge on Bali for their annual meetings to be held 8 -14 October. As a part of their itinerary a dinner will be held for the delegates at the GWK Festival Park, a vast field surrounded by limestone cliffs, within the sprawling 60-hectare cultural park.

In April a special ceremony officiated by the Governor of Bali, Mangku Pastika celebrated the installation of the statue’s 529th module, the Mahkota Dewa Wisnu – the 3.5-ton crown of Wisnu that is covered with gold-platted mosaics. A total of 754 modules of the statues outer skin, made of copper and brass sheeting, each weighing on average 800 kilograms, complete the installation.

Photo courtey PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

The project has occupied as many as 120 experienced wielders working on site to re-assemble the modules before they are lifted up by two cranes and bolted onto the outer steel frame of the statue by workers who specialize in high altitude construction. “During the initial stages of the statues design there was no available technique to enlarge the difficult and complicated three-dimensional forms, nor was there any computer software that could do this,” Nuarta said. “Therefore, I had to find the solution to the problem. Finally, in 1991 we found a theory, and along with the birth of Autocad software we could move forward.”

Rigorous scientific integrity testing has been undertaken on all the construction materials and the statue itself, even taking earthquake resistance into account with the pedestal being able to withstand up to 8 on the Richter scale. Wind tunnel tests have indicated the statue, the largest in Indonesia, could withstand winds speeds of up to 259 nautical miles per hour.

side elevation GWK statue - image courtesy PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

Standing 121 meters at the top of the Ungasan ridge, 271 meters above sea level and with a wingspan of 64 meters, the skin surface area of the statue reaches two and a half hectares or 25,000 m2, during the evening the statue will be a unique feature of the cultural park with its special lighting arrangement that was built-in Singapore. The statue will sit on a pedestal, or building base, which will function as a restaurant serving up to 500 people. There will also be a museum and a viewing gallery that will allow panoramic vistas of the rest of South Bali.

“The target is to attract 6,000 tourists per day,” Nuarta said, then continued. “Hopefully, Garuda Wisnu Kencana will serve as a reminder to Indonesians and the international audience, throughout this divisive period about our cultural roots as a tolerant and multicultural nation.”

Image Courtesy of PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: PT. Siluet Nyoman Nuarta

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recognizing extraordinary Balinese artistic talent: the 2018 TiTian Prize

2018-003-D-SUWIDIARTA I KETUT-END AND THE BEGINNING-120 X 100 CM                                       Beginning and End – Ketut Suwidiarta

 

The Bali art infrastructure is undergoing important transformation. This renewal is a timely, yet long and unique process. The intended outcome, however, will be a sustainable art eco system on the island with the benefactors being new buyers, seasoned collectors, art lovers, the curious, and of course the artists and the industry as well.

The infrastructure currently comprises of galleries, museums, art spaces, artist studios, cultural centers, the traditional, and digital media, along with the art schools, institutions and foundations. Art awards and competitions are an essential, supportive part of any art infrastructure. They are renowned for discovering and showcasing noteworthy emerging artists and launching their careers. The exposure to gallerists, curators, collectors, the media and local and international audiences provides excellent networking opportunities, and makes the task of being “discovered” much easier.

2018-034-D-ADI WIRAWAN-MERINDUKAN BALIKU YANG DULU-120 X 120 CM                           Merindukan Baliku Yang Dulu – Adi Wirawan

 

The nine finalists and winner of the second annual TiTian Prize were announced in Ubud, 29 January 2018, during the second anniversary celebrations of Yayasan TiTian Bali (YTB). A new and visionary art foundation, inaugurated on the 80th anniversary of the founding of the famous Ubud based artist collective the Pitamaha, YTB is setting out to change the art landscape in Bali. TiTian, meaning bridge or “Stepping Stone” in the Balinese language, with its annual program of exhibitions, awards, workshops and book releases, is an experimental playground and launch pad. In essence it serves as artist incubation.

“Bali has a vast cultural heritage that is at risk due to the disruptions caused by modern technological, social and cultural changes sweeping the world,” says the YTB Chairman of the Board of Advisors Soemantri Widagdo. “YTB will assist Balinese visual artists not only to navigate and survive this massive change, but to become successful art-entrepreneurs to benefit from and to be the drivers of the new opportunities of the 21st century creative economies in Bali and Indonesia.”

2018-033-D-ARI WINATA I NYOMAN-MENAGKAP RAJA BABI-150 X 200 CM                                Menagkap Raja Babi – Nyoman Ari Winata

 

The TiTian Prize is awarded to the most promising artist who demonstrates talent and courage in breaking new ground in Balinese art. This year’s finalists are Gede Suryawan, Ari Winata, Ketut Suwidiarta, Kadek Yuliantono, Made Suartama, Ida Bagus Suryantara, Made Wahyu Senayadi and Wayan Eka Mahardika Suamba. The TiTian Prize winner is the exciting young painter from Batuan, Wayan Aris Sarmanta.

“Keluarga Bumi”, 2017 (Earth Family), by Sarmanta, is a wonderfully imaginative, glowing ‘family portrait’ featuring the father, mother and child set within and a fertile, idyllic earth playground. Elements of Balinese traditional painting merge with modern and contemporary art genes. Striking color contrasts are balanced with a superbly poised composition, highlighting the strong narrative taken from the Balinese Hindu philosophies. Light hearted elements add to the painting’s story making it a delight to observe.

2018-016-D-ARIS SARMANTA I WAYAN-KELUARGA BUMI-100 X 80 CM   The Winner of the 2018TiTian Prize “Keluarga Bumi” by Wayan Aris Sarmanta 

 

“My painting visualizes the earth family along with the abundance of nature in a harmonic, caring, and self-sustaining relationship,” says Sarmanta, who was born in Batuan in 1995. And continues, “I experienced great pleasure, along with disbelief, upon being announced this year’s winner.”

Photographs do not do “Keluarga Bumi” justice, and the painting needs to be seen to fully appreciate the fresh new approach that is currently revolutionizaring the most loved and critically acclaimed genre of Balinese art – Batuan painting. Inspirational and humourous, Sarmanta’s work is pulsating, and full of life.

The YTB presentation also includes the third annual “Anugrah Pusaka Seni” (Art Heritage) Award to artists and a patron who have made extraordinary contributions to the Balinese Arts. The winners are A.A. Gde Meregeg (1907-2001), A.A. Gde Sobrat (1912-1992), Gusti Made Deblog (1906-1986), Dewa Nyoman Mura (1877-1950), Dewa Putu Kebes (1874-1962), and Gusti Putu Sodang (unknown – 1937). The Patron Award (Life Achievement) went to Prof. Drs. A.A Rai Kalam (1940-2017) who played a definitive role in the formation of the School of Art at ISI Denpasar.

2018-012-D-SURYANTARA IDA BAGUS-PALEMAHAN-125 X 120 CM                                   Palemahan – Ida Bagus Suryantara

 

For the first time this year YTB presented children’s prizes for age groups up to 12 years, and between 13 to 17 years of age. “The Titian Prize for children is to encourage the young generation of Balinese children to learn and continue the Balinese painting tradition,” says Widagdo. “The prizes are given in recognition, appreciation and encouragement, and consist of a certificate and art materials. In the future we plan to include a program of mentoring along with museum and studio visits.”

The 2018 TiTian Prize winner will travel to Europe to attend a Bali art exhibition in late fall this year in Leiden, the Netherlands. The exhibition will feature paintings by Sarmanta and Wayan Budiarta, also from Batuan, that have recently been acquired by the National Museum of World Cultures. The winner as well will tour major museums, art galleries and exhibitions in the Netherlands.

Sarmanta’s painting“Keluarga Bumi” is on display until the end of 2018 at TiTian Art Space, located at the end of Jalan Bisma, Ubud. Open to the public daily from 9am – 5pm, except Mondays.

2018-018-D-EKA MAHARDIKA SUAMBA-JIN KURAKURA-35 X 46 CM                            Jin Kurakura – Wayan Eka Mahadika Suamba

 

2018-006-D-YULIANTO I KADEK-RENAISSANCE IN BALI-90 X 70 CM                                   Renaissance in Bali – Kadek Yulianto

 

2018-001-D-SURYAWAN EKA PUTRA-DIALOGUE IN BLUE SEASON- 51 X 71 CM                           Dialogue in Blue Season – Gede Suryawan

 

2018-009-D- SUARTAMA I MADE- BATU TENGAH-80 X 80 CM.JPG                                      Batu Tengah – Made Suartama

 

TiTian Prize Childrens Art A- KETUT SANDRA GAUTAMA-NELAYAN-24 X 36 CM                TiTian Prize Children’s Art – Ketut Sandra Gautama

 

TiTian Childrens Prize - KADEK DWIKA DHARMA PUTRA-KEBERSAMAAN-22 X 32 CM .JPG                   TiTian Prize Children’s Art – Kadek Dwika Dharma Putra

 

2018-034-A- KADEK RIPA RYAN SUPUTRA-ANAK PANTAI-25,5 X 30 CM.JPG                       TiTian Prize Children’s Art – Kadek Ripa Ryan Suputra

www.titianartspace.com

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images Coutesy: TiTian Art Space

Bruce Carpenter: presenting Indonesian art & culture to the world

BruceC-2a                                                          Bruce Carpenter

 

A lust for life and adventure, along with a generous dose of savvy have propelled New York City born and bred Bruce W. Carpenter around the planet.

The son of a young American soldier who returned from WWII with an upper class English bride, Carpenter found himself torn between the idealism and glory of old Britain and the cosmopolitan metropolis of his birth. In the end, the creative cauldron that was NYC in the 60s & 70s would be the winner.

“I found my sanctuary in the great museums and then seminal art scene of the “City” where I was introduced to the Underground Art Scene and the Beat Poets. This would lead on to the first happenings, the precursor of installations, in Soho lofts, Andy Warhol’s Factory, experimental theatre and film,” says Carpenter, who eventually channelled his creativity into filmmaking. Carpenter was also an eyewitness and full-blown inductee into the Woodstock Generation, having attended the concert, and the Age of Aquarius. He played in a Blues band and was a member of several theatre groups.

Lempad_cvr_300dpiLempad of Bali: the illuminating lineCarpenter, Darling, Hinzler, McGowan, Vickers, Widagdo

The election of Richard Nixon and the resurgence of the conservative right, along with the death of a brother who served during the Vietnam War, precipitated a leap across the Atlantic Ocean to the city of Amsterdam where idyllic hippie dreams were still raging on. After experiencing one long and miserable Northern European winter, Carpenter succumbed to exotic tales of the mystic East recited by a new breed of young travellers.

In 1974 he sold his camera and bought a one-way ticket to Bangkok. During the next 18 months he would explore the east crisscrossing the Malay Peninsula and Indonesia starting in Sumatra. Together with the Swiss artist-photographer, Charles Junod, they would scout out wild destinations and create surreal installations that they photographed. These would tour Europe in an exhibition of surreal photography sponsored by the Canon Gallery.

When Carpenter arrived on the island paradise of Bali, Kuta was no more than a small village set in coconut groves adjacent to the beach. “There was a handful of homestays with a cast of international bohemian suffers and roaming hippies as the guests,” he recounts. The two most dangerous moving objects were falling coconuts and the deer-like Balinese cow.

sovarrubias-sketchesMiguel Covarrubias Sketches: Bali – Shanghai – Adriana Williams & Bruce W Carpenter

For the next decade Carpenter led a nomadic lifestyle with regular visits to Bali. In the early 1980s, after meeting Dr. Stanley Kripper, he began organizing cultural tours under the auspices of the Institute of Noetic Sciences in Sausalito. These specialized in visits to traditional healers and religious figures and would end with a book on traditional Balinese healing co-authored with Krippner and Dr. Denny Thong the head of Bali’s mental hospital in Bangli.

In 1985 Carpenter settled in Ubud and began working on a series of research and art projects usually tied with the art, history and culture of Indonesia. As his reputation grew he was invited to author and co-author a growing number of books. In 1993 he gained wide attention as the author of Willem G. Hofker, Painter of Bali (1993), the first major book on an expatriate artist on Bali. Several other books on expatriate artists soon followed including the acclaimed, W.O.J. Nieuwenkamp, the First European Artist in Bali (1997).

“Often in life, its not what you know, but who you know,” says Carpenter. Through a serious of discussions with key figures in the hotel industry in Bali Carpenter was to be granted a wonderful opportunity after he convinced the management of the Four Seasons Resort in Jimbaran that luxury hotels were the natural heirs of the mantle once held by the royal palaces as patrons of the arts. The result was the opening of the Ganesha Gallery, the first dedicated art gallery on the premises of a hotel in 1992. This was hailed as an excellent cultural bridge between the guests and Indonesian modern and traditional art.

9789814068154-us          Emilio Ambron: An Italian Artist in Bali – Bruce W. Carpenter

Initially the resort attracted wealthy and sophisticated international clientele and with the charismatic Carpenter as the figurehead of Ganesha and his sharp eye for art, the timing was perfect and it became an immediate success.

For a 15-year period the gallery held 12 exhibitions a year, an unheard of phenomenon in Indonesian art, confirming it as the fine art gallery in Bali. In its heyday well-heeled guests and local collectors purchased quantities of art, however over the years as the profile of the guests changed, along with events such as the Gulf War, 9/11 and the Bali bombings, and its market gradually faded. This experience for Carpenter gifted him with enormous experience and knowledge, along with connections and an international reputation.

In the meanwhile Carpenter would also begin publishing a series of books on the traditional arts of Indonesia, including Mentawai Art, Batak Sculpture, Nias Sculpture and two books on traditional jewellery. “I am a firm believer that expatriates should contribute to the country they live in. I was blessed with a deep knowledge and appreciation of Indonesian arts and culture which is fast disappearing and I have taken it upon myself to try to record as much of it as possible.

4mpXadWmpPcjnmClhQXP          W.O.J Nieuwenkamp: First European Artist in Bali – Bruce W. Carpenter

In all, Carpenter has written and co-authored over twenty books and scores of articles on Indonesian art, culture and history. However, with the recent release of the book Lempad of Bali – The illuminating Line, the first fully comprehensive study on the master of Balinese traditional artist, Gusti Nyoman Lempad (1862-1978), on the 20th September 2014 at Museum Puri Lukisan, he admits, “this has by far been the most challenging project I have engaged in in my life.”

“As the book concept and project manager my list of tasks was unprecedented. I had to oversee interactions with over forty institutions and collectors in eight different countries, each with different requirements, along with dealing with six authors, one of whom is dead!” Carpenter says. “Our endeavour was to include the broadest range of Lempad’s works available in the book, therefore the detective work required was unbeknown to us and consequentially enormous.” The beautiful volume of over 424 pages is the culmination of more than six years work for the team of dedicated and respected academics and professionals.

“Bali deserves to have world class art exhibitions, books and events to create more interest in its immense and unique culture,” Carpenter states.

“I am dedicated to the publication of illustrated books on the traditional arts of Indonesia which have disappeared or are disappearing. We honor the past by recording its brilliance. I also feel it is important to urge young Indonesians to do the same. It is ironic that westerners play such a critical role in the studies of Indonesian art. This should change.”

Opinionated and articulate Carpenter counts many, including the rich and famous, as friends. A father of two he cuts both a dashing and unusual figure. His trailblazing journey through life is rich in colourful tales that are steeped in the exotic, mysterious and dynamic.

127446                                 Indonesian Tribal Art – Bruce W. Carpenter

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Nyoman Gunarsa (1944 – 2017) One of Bali’s Poineering Modernist

335-maestro_lukis_nyoman_gunarsa_meninggal_dunia_dok_youtube-696x341             RIP Nyoman Gunarsa – One of Bali’s pioneering modern artist

With the recent passing of Balinese artist Nyoman Gunarsa on the 10th September 2017 an important chapter of Balinese art comes to a close. His legacy as an artist, art lecturer, art collective leader and museum owner, however, will be long lasting. Born in Klungkung, East Bali in 1944, Gunarsa was the first post war Balinese artist to rise to national prominence. His contribution to the development of Balinese art as one of the pioneering modern expressionist painters was in the exploration of form, rather than the narrative.

Gunarsa’s energetic style of applying paint to canvas with spontaneous, gestural brushstrokes was likened by some to a musical conductor, and he was affectionately known as the maestro. Raised nearby to the village of Kamasan, which during the 16th – 20th centuries was the epicenter of Balinese Classical art, Gunarsa was renowned for his dedication to the art of his forefathers. Academically trained, he quickly matured as a realism painter, yet in the 1980’s his fresh approach to depicting the characters from the Wayang Kulit shadow puppet theater broke new aesthetic grounds in Balinese art.

nyoman gunarsa, 2006 water color on paper. 115x161cm.Barong Dance,Gunarsa’s dynamic paintings emphasized the energy and movement that typified Balinese performance and ceremony.

The foundation of Balinese art is drawing. The strictly governed rules and techniques that characterize the Classical style begin with the sketching of the composition, the drawing of the fine black ink outlines of all visual information, and the coloring in of figures, forms and motifs. Originally these were collective works completed by a group of artists, as a communal offering of gratitude to the Gods. The application of color involved controlled brushstrokes, layered until the desired results are achieved – a brushwork technique akin to drawing, or penciling in the colorful hues.

Gunarsa’s signature style was an adaptation from western art, in which the individual’s innovative ideas, emotions and energy are omnipotent. Freedom and power of expressive, often minimal brushstrokes defined his visual approach. Gunarsa captured a fresh sense of dynamism in his interpretations of iconic scenarios from the Balinese Hindu legends, along with his revolutionary method of capturing traditional ceremony and performance, especially beautiful women dancing. Fusing his cultural knowledge with elements of expressionism and abstract painting immediately set his work apart from that of his contemporaries.

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Colorful, pulsating movement and vitality categorize Balinese ceremony, performance and dance. This has been a source of inspiration for artists over many generations, yet never had a painter captured the seen, and unseen elements of energy, with Gunarsa’s colorful vibrancy. Form along with the decorative elements of Balinese Classical painting took on wonderful new life, and an exciting, newfound match for the unique, real visual spectacle was born.

As an art lecturer at Yogyakarta’s ASRI (Academi Seni Rupa Indonesia) during the late 1960’s and into the 1970’s Gunarsa was a catalyst to great change. He shared his vast knowledge and enthusiasm with a new, young generation of Balinese artists, the first to venture outside of their cultural structures and restraints, to be academically trained in Central Java. These were the formative days of Balinese contemporary art. Via their fresh approach to exploration and expression using new and unusual media they transformed Balinese philosophies, rituals and symbols into an exciting new visual language.

Gunarsa(DK)

Gunarsa helped establish Indonesia’s longest running artist collective, Sanggar Dewata Indonesia, SDI (Workshop of the Gods) in 1970, inviting his Balinese students to form the new association. SDI grew to create a social collective to coordinate artistic activities, exhibitions and organize debates on art outside the institutional teaching framework. It offered its members freedom to collaborate and create without having to fear being labeled as supporters of certain political parties, during a highly politicized era of Indonesian history.

While the influential 1936 – 1945 Pita Maha artists collective redefined Balinese traditional art with modern aesthetics for the burgeoning tourist market, SDI set about redefining from the artist’s perspective based on the search for new ideas, self-expression, and national identity. This new art movement laid the foundations for the future, while inspiring many young artist to study in Yogyakarta, and Balinese contemporary art evolved to reveal its own distinct ‘voice’ in world art, while spawning generations of talented artists.

Sketch in black ink- Gunarsa

During the 1980’s – 1990’s Gunarsa and others such as Wianta, Sika, Djirna and Erawan enjoyed national and international success. Gunarsa opened the Museum of Contemporary Indonesian Painting in Yogyakarta in 1989. His next milestone was in 1994 when the Nyoman Gunarsa Museum of Classical Painting opened next to his residence in Klungkung. In the 3-storey venue he combined his own works with Classical paintings from the 17th – 19th centuries. Dedicated to the preservation of this unique art form Gunarsa acquired scarce works, including ones painted on rare ulantaga bark paper.

Artifacts, stone and woodcarvings, traditional furniture, masks, sculptures and a collection of sacred ceremonial kris add to the historical significance of his museum. In August 2017 the Indonesian President Joko Widodo attended an official reception at the museum in Gunarsa’s honor. As an international, multi award winning artist Gunarsa held solo exhibitions in more than ten foreign countries.

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A landmark celebration of Balinese art was held from July – October 2012 at Gunarsa’s museum, The First International Festival of Classical Balinese Painting. The festival included works from collections of seven other countries, along with the participation of some of the world’s leading foreign authorities on Balinese Classical art. “Classical Balinese paintings have been admired world wide since the European society first became acquainted with the East in the 15th century,” said Gunarsa. “And since then other countries have searched out these masterpieces to enrich their cultural references because of the extraordinary implied messages, philosophies, and counsels about the life of the Balinese.”

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Words: Richard Horstman