Monthly Archives: December 2019

Kulidan Kitchen Space: building community through creativity, education, activism & food

Volunteer art teacher Mega with local children and the outcome of one of her weekly art workshops.The volunteer art teacher at Kulidan Kitchen Space, Ni Nengah Mega Risna Dewi with local children and the outcome of one the regular art workshops.

 

One of the most satisfying phenomenon’s of Bali’s recent modern development has been the birth of an array of art and creative, multi-purpose spaces that serve as platforms for community co-working and engagement. Kulidan Kitchen Space, a new initiative in the rice fields of the Guwung village, Sukawati, fifteen minutes from Denpasar, is one such venue.

Kulidan is the name of the district’s subak, the world-renown historical irrigation structure found throughout the island defined by a system of canals directing the water into terraced rice fields that were developed on Bali during the 9th century. The Balinese Hindu religion, along with specific temples play a vital role within this agrarian management cooperative. The kitchen is at heart of the venues core philosophy, highlighting farming practices and the environment where the local people live, work and grow together in the spirit of community.

Presentation for design students at Kulidan Kitchen        Presentation for design students at Kulidan Kitchen Space during 2019

 

A priority of Kulidan Kitchen is to gather people, family, friends and guests, both local and otherwise, to sit and converse while appreciating good food and refreshments – most of which is produced by the local farmers. Of course, they enjoy the scenery, with magnificent rice fields views, sunsets, and the vista of the majestic volcanic peak of Mount Agung to the east. The multi-purpose public space consists of a large pavilion with a second storey loft, an external long table for dining experiences, the kitchen and gardens set out upon a 120 square meter expansive of land, roomy enough for events catering for up to 300 people.

The project is the vision of activist Komang Adiartha, the land upon which Kulidan Kitchen was built in 2017 belongs to his father, a local rice farmer. Adi, as he is known, is supported by a dedicated and enthusiastic team including Martino, Vifick Bolang, Ni Nengah Mega Risna Dewi, Supriyati along with the kitchen team of Surya, Didi and Wawah and also family, friends, local residents, and members of the Bali art and creative communities. A glance at Adi’s social media portals reveals an energetic and inspiring character committed to cultural and environmental preservation. He shares his relevant opinions on critical and diverse subjects such as fair trade, conscious business, clean energy, and child labour issues.

Kulidan Kitchen Space - Sukawati Image Richard HorstmanKulidan Kitchen & Space, Banjar Wangbung, Jalan Salya, Guwang, Gianyar, Bali

 

“Building community through children’s art and education are just one of our primary directives,” says Adi. “Our art programs often have an emphasis on activism, creating art to raise the local youth’s awareness of the areas farming practices in order to stimulate appreciation and respect for these time-honoured traditions.” Painting large colourful murals depicting environmental and cultural themes on wall spaces on the outside of, and opposite the venue, are ongoing creative projects led by Bali street artists, with the help of the children.

One of their well attended ongoing events “Meet the Creator”, is an inspirational sharing program where the public can meet, hear stories and engage directly with artists, musicians, designers and other creative activists. “We believe in this program as an alternative reference for young people,” Adi says. “To find or further strengthen their choices about possible professions or hobbies they may wish to pursue.”

Mural Project in the rice fields opposite Kulidan Kitchen Space - Image Richard Horstman        Mural Project in the rice fields opposite Kulidan Kitchen Space

 

During August Nele Gruender, a German art therapy student from the HKS Ottersburg University of Fine Art, Theatre, Performance and Art Therapy conducted weekly art workshops for children as a part of an academic research project involving children’s drawings. A regular visitor to Bali she has witnessed the rapid transformation of the landscape and pondered how such transformation impacts upon the living environments of young children, and how they may respond in their pictures.

“The home is the theme of my workshops,” says Gruender. “A home is a special place for growing children to develop their identity and individuality. Through my freely structured workshops, I will gather photographs of the children’s artworks which I will later research in order to discover reoccurring symbols and patterns that arise in the drawings.” Building a model of transcultural research, she plans to repeat this with German children to reveal similarities and differences in their drawings of what home means to them. “At the moment I am not sure of the outcomes,” she says. “Yet what is important is to grant these children opportunities to express their creativity while building more resources.”

20190812_085316During August 2019 Nele Gruender (top left), a German art therapy student from the HKS Ottersburg University of Fine Art, Theatre, Performance and Art Therapy conducted weekly art workshops for children as a part of an academic research project involving children’s drawings.

 

A recent Kulidan event included live music, and DJ’s performances, along with food, art and creative product stalls providing opportunities for creatives to display their products, demonstrate their creative processes, and then facilitate forums giving explanations on developing concepts with marketing plans and building business models.

“The diversity of happenings we can host is limited only to people’s imaginations, we welcome everyone, and new ideas,” Adi says. “Kulidan can be used as a public space for events according to your needs, such as meetings, performances, exhibitions, seminars, collaborations and presentations. People may hire the space and help contribute to the venues running expenses.”

Pentas teater pangeran empasPentas Teater Pangeran Empas theatre performance by children from the Kulidan community

 

Balinese children enjoying research drawing workshop conducted by German art therapy student Nele Gruender at Kulidan Kitchen 11 August 2019- Image Richard HorstmanBalinese children enjoying research drawing workshop conducted by German art therapy student Nele Gruender at Kulidan Kitchen 11 August 2019

 

67506148_696289127476917_6814809954134786048_o An exhibition of urban planning designs at Kulidan Kitchen Space during 2019

 

34579143_444838409288658_419953527016652800_oA community discussion during an exhibition in 2019 at Kulidan Kitchen Space

 

 

Kulidan Kitchen & Space,

Banjar Wangbung

Jalan Salya, Guwang, Gianyar, Bali
Tel: 0813-3866-5862

Follow @ kulidan.kitchen on Instagram

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Richard Horstman & Courtesy of Kulidan Kitchen & Space

 

ART JAKARTA 2019 – evolving into one of the regions most significant art fairs

Japanese artist Takehiko Sugawara "Garyu no Matsu" Image Richard Horstman                   Garyu no Matsu  – Japanese artist Takehiko Sugawara

 

Under wraps, the 11th edition of Art Jakarta, Indonesia’s most significant art fair open from 30 August – 1 September 2019 at JCC (Jakarta Convention Center). And by reports from gallerists, exhibiting artists, attendees and the Fair organization itself, outcomes have exceeded expectations.

Following on from the demise of Art Stage Jakarta in 2017, and Art Stage Singapore in 2018, Art Jakarta has strategically positioned itself, filling the void and consolidating itself as one of Southeast Asia’s most important art fairs. Featuring 70 galleries from 14 countries – Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, USA, Taiwan, Russia, Australia, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam and China, the fair enjoyed strong sales, with more than 39,000 visitors over the three days.

Art Jakarta fairground view Saturday 31 August. Image courtesy of Art Jakarta Art Jakarta fairground view Saturday 31 August. Image courtesy Art Jakarta

 

From Indonesia, 30 of the country’s established and emerging galleries participated, including Edwin’s Gallery, RUCI Art Space, Lawangwangi, CGartspace, Bale Projects, SAL Projects and ART_UNLTD by BEKRAF, a presentation of 51 emerging and established artists from different backgrounds, initiated by Indonesian Agency for Creative Economy (Badan Ekonomi Kreatif ) and curators Asmujo J. Irianto, Bob Edrian, Irawan Karseno and Totot Indrarto.

Just a few of the international gallery participants were Amy Li Gallery – Beijing, Flowers Gallery – London/New York/Hong Kong, Mizuma Gallery – Tokyo/Singapore/New York, Yavuz Gallery – Singapore and Bluerider ART from Taipei. Thirty per cent of the 70 participating galleries made their debut at Art Jakarta, reflecting the brand’s strong reputation and potential. Auction house Phillips Asia was among the new exhibitors, displaying artworks, watches and jewellery.

"Lumina Clorofilliana", 2019 Filippo Sciascia. Lacqured Photo Aluminium And Led Light. Image coutesy of Yeo Workshop

“Lumina Clorofilliana”, 2019 Filippo Sciascia. Lacquered Photo Aluminium And Led Light. Image courtesy of Yeo Workshop

 

“Due to the uncertain political environment of the past few years there has been a subdued market response to the fair,” stated Edwin Rahardjo, founder of Edwin’s Gallery and the Head of the Indonesian Association of Art Galleries (AGSI). “This year, however, we have had a more stable political and economic climate in Indonesia, which has led to a renewed energy. I could feel that the audience was much more positive and upbeat. The increased activity by young local collectors was noticeable.”

Art Jakarta reported several new buyers acquiring art pieces for the first time as well as renewed interest and purchases from buyers who had been inactive for some time. New international collectors were also spotted at the fair, expanding Art Jakarta’s collector base. Collector’s attending the fair hailed from throughout Southeast Asia and the Asia region, Europe, America and Australia.

"Savage Orchid" 2019 - Nus Salomo. Image richard Horstman                                 Savage Orchid 2019 – Nus Salomo

 

Commenting upon the relocation of Art Jakarta from the Ritz-Carlton Jakarta, Pacific Place to the Jakarta Convention Center in Senayan, Rahardjo said, “The JCC has many practical advantages over the previous venue, including being larger. It allows for much easier loading and unloading of artworks, and offers positive tax incentives for international galleries.”

Australian based Indonesian artist Jumaadi works from his Yogyakarta and Sydney studios and was represented at Art Jakarta by Jan Manton Art from Brisbane, Australia. His exhibition of thematic and aesthetically distinct works stood out amongst the competition. Jumaadi’s feedback was also positive, “We have previously participated in Australian and Southeast Asian fairs; however, this is the first experience for both Jan Manton and I at Art Jakarta – and it was amazing. Comparatively speaking this fair is no worse off, or better off than the others. It is very dynamic, and the number of people during the opening was astonishing. The response to my work was strong, and we are very optimistic about the future of Art Jakarta.”

Art Jakarta fair attendees and installation by Filippino artist Ronald Ventura at Yavuz Gallery. Image by Richard HorstmanArt Jakarta fair attendees and installation by Filippino artist Ronald Ventura at Yavuz Gallery

 

“The move from Pacific Place means that the audience is art-focused and not shopping mall visitors looking for alternative entertainment,” said Kemal Ezedine, a regular participant at Art Jakarta, who exhibited paintings with Jakarta’s CGartspace. “I believe that Art Jakarta is now stepping up to the next level.”

Art Jakarta is an essential meeting place,” said Suriawati Qui co-founder of CushCush Gallery in Denpasar. “Such interactions between the national and international art communities open up opportunities for important issues and conversations to be raised, opportunities for artists and galleries to get to know their peers from across the region, and encourages cross-cultural and cross border collaborations.”

Artwork by Balinese contemporary artist Made Valasara. Image Richard Horstman                   Artwork by Balinese contemporary artist Made Valasara

 

“As an international gallery, we have always enjoyed participating in Art Jakarta and connecting with the Indonesian art community,” said Audrey Yeo, owner/producer of Yeo Workshop, Gillman Barracks Singapore. “The fair allows us to market our artists and programs with familiar faces and new networks. With its rejuvenated format and the new venue, there was a general sense of enthusiasm from the audience and the galleries. Art Jakarta is currently very promising as one of the strongest regional fairs. The fair has good organisers with a solid working style.”

“Although small, Art Jakarta was fascinating and featured some good work. One aspect I especially liked was the smaller booths representing art collectives and artist initiatives,” said Ian Findlay-Brown, editor and publisher of Asia Art News based in Hong Kong. As one of the regions first art magazines in the English language, and one of the most knowledgeable writers in the Asia region with over 40 years of experience, Findlay-Brown has witnessed the major changes in the Southeast Asian art scene during the past thirty years.

Indonesian artist Jumaadi represented by Jan Manton Art. Image Richard Horstman             Indonesian artist Jumaadi represented by Jan Manton Art

 

Commenting on “Jakarta Scene” a designated space in the fair for artist collectives and artist initiatives that offered many diverse artworks, art products and objects, along with valuable information about their activities, that are a cornerstone of Indonesia’s dynamic art scene, Findlay-Brown stated, “You don’t often see this aspect of a local art scene represented in an art fair in the Asia region. It reveals an important facet of the vitality of the local art world that can often be missed or overlooked.”

“Their array of art products, clothing, toys and sculptures emphasizes an important fun aspect of the art world. The Fair directors, by inviting these dynamic young individuals and collectives highlight a fundamental and vibrant characteristic of the Indonesian contemporary art world.”

Sculpture by Chinese artist Cai Lei. Image Richard Horstman                               Sculpture by Chinese artist Cai Lei

 

“The strength of the Indonesian art scene has always been its ‘gotong-royong’ or community spirit. This has lent Art Jakarta its special Indonesian identity which translates into a very unique fair experience for our visitors, exhibitors and partners,” said Art Jakarta Fair Director Tom Tandio. “It is only by working together that we can strengthen the art scenes in both Indonesia and Southeast Asia, which will benefit the community as a whole.”

“We were very humbled by the positive response that we received as it is a measure of the confidence that Indonesia and the region’s art community has placed in Art Jakarta, and the changes that we implemented for this 11th edition of the Fair.”

Art Jakarta enjoyed large audiences and strong sales during the fair the that ran 30 August - 1 September. Image coutesy of Art JakartaArt Jakarta enjoyed large audiences and strong sales during the fair the that ran 30 August – 1 September. Image courtesy of Art Jakarta

 

"Iris" by Singaporean artist Melissa Tan exhibited by ISA. Image Richard Horstman                       Iris by Singaporean artist Melissa Tan exhibited by ISA

 

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy of Richard Horstman unless stated.