Monthly Archives: December 2018

Smart’s cutting parade of choreography

Chout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) @ Tony Raka Art Gallery - Image Courtesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn PrittChout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) at Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud – Image Courtesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn Pritt

 

Australian contemporary artist Sally Smart has a long and enduring bond with Indonesia, having first exhibited in 2005 at the Jogja Biennale. “I have a special fascination in the shadow theatre, and have had a collection of Wayang Kulit puppets for many years. This has inspired my interest in the representation of the shadow world and its story telling dimension, across cultures,” Smart said.

“I visit Yogyakarta regularly where I have formed relationships with artists and artisans who I continue to collaborate with and engage in immersive dialogue and practice, examining cultural history and the commonalities in the post-colonial world discourse.”

 

P.A.R.A.D.E - Sally Smart @ BIASA - Image Richard Horstman                         P.A.R.A.D.E – Sally Smart at BIASA, Kerobokan

 

In 2012, as the Sackler fellow at the University of Connecticut, USA Smart worked with their School of Puppetry and animation, learning shadow puppet techniques and creating a series of works that also included moving image. Her puppet creations are a fusion of Eastern and Western cultures, the artist also being inspired by the seminal European avant-garde artists of the Dada movement, along with the Constructivism philosophies. She positions early 20th century experimental choreography, costume and theatre design alongside traditional Indonesian shadow puppet performance.

The ‘immediacy and simplicity’ of collage as a potent contemporary art practice is often overlooked. Cutting out and re-assembling, taking from one source to compliment another is a disruptive, yet highly creative method with limitless potentialities. For Smart it is the foundation of the communication of her artistic ideas. “The cut out methodology has been a strong part of my practice since the early nineties – the expression of a cut out – aligns silhouette and the shadow play conceptually and technically,” she said.

Puppets (The Choreography of Cutting) - Sally Smart @ Tony Raka Art Gallery - Images coutesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn PrittPuppets (The Choreography of Cutting) – Sally Smart at the Tony Raka Art Gallery – Images coutesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn Pritt

 

Honold Fine Art (HFA) presents in parallel solo exhibitions Sally Smart’s most recent offerings held in two different venues in Bali, Indonesia. From 19 June The Choreography of Cutting opened at the Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud, and P.A.R.A.D.E. at BIASA in Kerobokan. Her work ‘speaks’ about the human body as a vehicle of expression through movement, performance and gesture, revealing collective and individual anxieties, while questioning the status quo.

At a glance both shows appear worlds apart, yet they are innately connected, P.A.R.A.D.E. being the perfect synthesis of Smart’s two works exhibited in Ubud. Displayed at Tony Raka is Chout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) 2018, an enormous 350 x 900cm wall hanging assemblage in which abstract organic forms and imaginary landscapes come alive upon Smart’s colourful textile curtain that includes dye transfer photographic prints on satin and chiffon, with multiple collage elements. And, Puppets (The Choreography of Cutting) 2016-18 a mixed-media installation of over 30 abstract suspended puppets, with moveable parts and of varying dimensions.

P.A.R.A.D.E - Sally Smart @ BIASA Image Courtesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn PrittP.A.R.A.D.E – Sally Smart at BIASA  – Image Courtesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn Pritt

 

P.A.R.A.D.E is inspired by Smart’s encounter with the immense stage curtain painted by Pablo Picasso for the Ballet Parade in 1917 on display in Rome in 2017. In Smart’s P.A.R.A.D.E which features Parade (In Being Dancing), 2018, Staging the Studio (Blaubart &Pina), 2017-18, and Drama (Staging the Studio), 2018, all floor to ceiling curtains with photographic dye transfers on textile with collage elements, a troupe of figures are represented on transparent textiles intersecting and overlapping to create multiple images of performance.

While Chout Ballet Curtain is predominated by strong colors and dense ‘heavy’ fabrics, the illusory impact emphasizes the laws of gravity grounding the observer to the floor. P.A.R.A.D.E, on-the-other-hand, has the opposite impact. It’s multiple see-through films are soft and delicate, soothing upon the eye. While its transparent qualities with layered figures appear sensual – a most potent allure. Air conditioning choreographs gentle rhythmic waves of motion across the curtain’s surfaces that are seemingly engaged within a dance of their own, and we become captivated in the dynamic interplay of Smart’s layered translucent ‘performers’. Our vision is then drawn upwards allowing us to feel elevated and expansive. The beauty and simplicity of the material is seductive – our experience is potent and ethereal.

Puppets (The Choreography of Cutting) - Sally Smart @ Tony Raka Art Gallery - Image is coutesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn PrittPuppets (The Choreography of Cutting) – Sally Smart at Tony Raka Art Gallery – Image coutesy of Honold Fine Art & Evelyn Pritt

 

One of Australia’s leading contemporary artists, Smart is the recipient of numerous awards and prizes. She is currently the Vice-Chancellor’s Professorial Fellow at University of Melbourne, and a board member of the National Association for the Visual Arts. She is represented in significant international public and private art collections. Recognized internationally for her large scale cut-out assemblage installations and, increasingly, performance, Smart’s artistic practice engages identity politics and the complex relationships between the body, thought and culture.

The most delightful aspects of Smart’s work are the opportunities for audience interaction, and personal art experiences. Her installations invite the observer to venture closer, to wander within and take part in a make believe other world. In response some people become animated in their own intimate performance, which has the potential to touch them deeply, while being coded into their memories.

Detail of Chout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) - Sally Smart - Image Richard Horstman   Detail of Chout Ballet Curtain, (The Choreography of Cutting) – Sally Smart

 

“I am interested to observe the audience physically engage with my work,” the artist said. “As performance and movement are imbedded conceptually in the works, the feeling of movement and dance within the space becomes manifest, with the puppets and the curtains – making it feel dynamic and engaging. I was excited to see this.”

When asked if she believes that as artists seek out new avenues to create more positive opportunities for fresh and personal audience art experiences that society will gain greater benefits through contemporary art? Smart responded, “Yes, always when something is triggered, even the slightest gesture, to reveal and present possibilities for news ways of thinking an engagement in all aspects of society. Art makes essential pathways.”

20180620_155042_IMG_4240                           Detail of P.A.R.A.D.E – Sally Smart at BIASA 

 

 

The Choreography of Cutting

at Tony Raka Art Gallery,

Jalan Raya Mas 86, Mas, Ubud

& P.A.R.A.D.E. at BIASA,

Jalan Raya Kerobokan 51 X, Kerobokan

Open from 17 June – 17 July 2018

www.sallysmart.com

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Courtesy of Honold Fine Art with Evelyn Pritt & Richard Horstman

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Welcome to Denpasar2018 Art+Design: An Exhibition & Movement

Invited artist Yoka Sara                        Denpasar2018 – invited artist Yoka Sara

 

During the month of October a unique program of activities presented by CushCush Gallery (CCG) in Denpasar highlights the ongoing transformation of the city into a modern creative hub that is evolving side-by-side with its cultural and historical icons. Opening 5 October DenPasar2018 Art+Design – An Exhibition & Movement headlines the program along with other community happenings, including Design Talk, Design Walk, Open Studios, that coincide with the launch of the DenPasar Art+Design Map 2018/2019.

 “In recent years many creatives from throughout Indonesia and overseas have been attracted to Bali for its lifestyle and rich culture. Many decide to base themselves here, while others return regularly. As the island’s multi-cultural society evolves so does its creative potential,” said CCG co-founder Suriawati Qiu, who along with her partner Jindee Chua in July 2016 launched CCG upon the local art and design landscape injecting exciting energy into Bali’s creative scene.

Curatorial Talk #1 with Kevin & Marishka 6 10 2018   Curatorial Talk #1 with Kevin & Marishka 6th October at CushCush Gallery

 

“Nowadays many of Bali’s youths have been educated in universities outside Bali and internationally, and then return. They are important agents of change and vital contributors to Bali’s artistic spirit and are stakeholders in the new emerging creative economy.”

The development of Bali’s contemporary art and design infrastructure (including new art spaces, co-working creative hubs, festivals, and organizations) are the important meeting and showcasing points for the thriving new generation of creatives. Following on from the first edition released in 2017 the DenPasar Art+Design Map 2018/2019 will include a listing of community events celebrating Art & Design in October.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA               Design Talk – Denpasar Inside : Out at Maya Sanur Ballroom

 

The DenPasar Art+Design Map 2018/2019 highlights museums, government and cultural institutions, art and design educational institutions, art galleries and creative spaces, art and creative communities, festivals, artists’ studios, cultural heritage/public spaces/monuments, and the markets within the city of Denpasar.  The map is endorsed by the Denpasar Central Government (Pemerintah Kota Denpasar), Indonesian Hotel and Restaurant Association and the Denpasar Tourism Promotion Board, along with the Indonesian Government’s Agency for Creative Economy, Badan KREATIF Denpasar. Printed in 10,000 copies the map will be distributed at selected Creative spaces and hotels in Bali over the next twelve months. The unique feature of this year’s map is the QR Code to allow direct access to the listed venues via the smart phone App.

“The recent importance given to the creative economy, and its support through government organizations such as Bekraf encourages initiatives in the Creative sectors of economy,” Suria added. “The government plays an important role too.”

Invited artist Alit Ambara                         Denpasar2018 – invited artist Alit Ambara

 

Three invited artists along with 12 Shortlisted Open Call artists will exhibit in DenPasar2018 – An Exhibition and Movement. Themed “Jingga”, which describes the colour of twilight and is a metaphor of how the people of Denpasar feel about both the joys and hardships living in Denpasar. The theme endeavours to capture varying perspectives within Bali’s multi-layered realities in a three-month long exhibition showcasing works of fine artists, designers, architects and performers. Works featured include paintings, installations, multimedia projections, photography, ceramic art, and posters.

Co-curated by Suriawati and Jindee, and independent curator Stella Katherine, the invited artists include Sydney-based painter and performer Jumaadi (b. 1973, Sidoarjo, East Java), who has collaborated with Balinese traditional Kamasan painters, designer and activist Alit Ambara (b. 1970, Singaraja, Bali), exhibiting his poster designs and artefacts used in social movements, and renowned artist and architect Yoka Sara (b. 1965, Denpasar, Bali), who founded and leads SPRITES ART & CREATIVE BIENNALE (est. 2013).

Layung #2 zatkimia 17 10 2018            Layung #2 zatkimia at CushCush Gallery 17th October

 

DesignTalk invites distinguished practitioners and scholars of architecture and design disciplines, including Budiman Hendropurnomo of DCM Indonesia, Maximilian Jencquel of Studio Jencquel, a lecturer and researcher from Warmadewa University Gede Maha Putra, and Japa Wibisana and Magat Kurniawan as representatives of the Indonesian Young Architects community, to share their specialized perspectives on the evolution and transformation of Bali’s architecture. DesignTalk is hosted by Suzy Annetta, the Editor-in-Chief of Design Anthology Magazine and is themed “Bali Inside:Out”.

DenPasar2018 Art+Design is a collective effort to mark the city with its own distinct character as a hub for contemporary arts, design and culture. With CCG’s DenPasar program we aspire to put Denpasar city in the mapping of contemporary Art + Design in Bali and beyond by showcasing the potential in Denpasar and inviting Art + Design lovers to come explore,” Suria stated.

Denpasar2018 Mural Jamming with Kuncir and students of ISI Denpasar on the walls of the Kerobokan prison 30 10 2018Mural Jamming on the walls of the Kerobokan Prison with Kuncir and art students from ISI Denpasar 30th October

 

This combination of an exciting mix of people who are presently in Bali, and the many active platforms give a rise to exciting collaborations and events, to be shared amongst local communities. This visionary initiative helps to lay the foundation for increasing art/cultural/design tourism into the island’s capital and developing the local creative economy.

Located near the heart of the city, CCG is in Gang Rajawali, off Jalan Teuku Umar. An alternative gallery, with an inspiring and unique program embracing interactions and multidisciplinary creativity via explorations at the intersections of art, design, materiality, techniques and crafts, CCG prioritizes community engagement and learning, along with children’s workshops. Open to the public CCG is a must see in Denpasar.

Invited artist Jumaadi

                          Denpasar2018 – invited artist Jumaadi

 

Gotong Royong Seni with Mella Jaarsma 10 11 2018gotong royong seni with Mella Jaarsma 10th November at CushCush Gallery

 

Denpasar2018 Ceramic Painting Workshop 20 10 2018               Ceramics painting Workshop at CushCush Gallery 20th October

 

 

 

DenPasar2018 Exhibition continues until 5 January 2019

Monday—Friday: 9:00AM–5:00PM
Saturday: 9:00AM–12:00PM

CushCush Gallery (CCG)

Jl. Teuku Umar Gg. Rajawali No.1A Denpasar, Bali

Tel. (62) 361 484558

http://www.cushcushgallery.com

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: Denpasar2018 & CushCush Gallery

 

 

Investing in Balinese traditional art? Now is the right time.

IMG_8546 National Struggle                    National Struggle, 2016 – Pande I Made Dwi Artha

 

Within the sphere of Indonesian art, Balinese traditional art is a small niche market. It has recently, however, witnessed positive developments, and this progression, both in its appreciation and valuation, is leading to increasing national and international popularity.

The rapid evolution of information technology has led to greater access to knowledge about Balinese art, along with the publishing of more quality art books. Recent developments within the Bali art infrastructure, and the fact that experts believe the market is undervalued, with strong future growth potential, point to now being an excellent time to buy Balinese traditional art as an investment.

"Tapak Dara - Unity Tapak Dara - Pilar Kebangsaan" Aris Sarmanta. Image Richard HorstmanTapak Dara – Unity Tapak Dara – Pilar Kebangsaan, 2017 – Wayan Aris Sarmanta

 

The dynamics leading to Balinese art being underappreciated and undervalued have been due to its perception. Within world art Balinese art has been maligned, often referred to as ‘tourist’ and folk art – a craft without a legitimate place in Indonesian art history. Some of its finest practitioners, however, were, and are today, from the Balinese high castes therefore, it is not an art form exclusive to the common people. The leading artists nowadays are in a life long, ‘sacred’ pursuit dedicated to reaching new levels of technical skill and aesthetic mastery.

Initially collected and exhibited in anthropological museums of the Netherlands, and not in the renowned art museums of Europe, it was presented with a demeaning colonial narrative, referred to as art made by primitive people. This situation, however, has recently undergone change. The institutions with the most important collections of Balinese art have been rebranded – renamed Museums of World Culture. From now on Balinese traditional art will be presented free from the old narratives, given special curatorial attention to its significance, while being exhibited with the highest technological standards. This will impact positively upon its perception and appreciation internationally, and within Indonesia.

Wayan Budiarta - Drowning - 2017                                Drowning, 2017 – Wayan Budiarta

 

During the past twelve years Jakarta auctioneers Larasati have been tireless promoters of Balinese traditional art. 2018 marks the tweleth year of its Bali auctions, held twice yearly in Ubud. Larasati’s website provides sale data from past auctions, information, and access to online live bidding. Market data reveals strong growth for the Ubud painter A.A Gde Anom Sukawati, if you purchased a work in 2003 for about USD 2,000 – 3,000, it can be sold at auction in 2016 at about USD 23,000. Similarly, a collector invested USD 2,000 – 3,0000 in 2003 on a masterpiece by Ida Bagus Putu Sena that sold at auction in 2012 for about USD 14,000.

The major change maker on the Balinese art landscape is the TiTian Bali Art Foundation, located in Ubud. Open in 2016, and specializing in identifying, and nurturing emerging talent and introducing the best artists to the market. During 2017 TiTian presented some of the finest artists from the renowned school of Batuan painting. Wayan Budiarta, Wayan Aris Sarmanta (winner of the 2018 TiTian Prize), Pande I Made Dwi Artha and Gede Widyantara are young talents on the rise. Six paintings by two of these artists were purchased by Museums of World Culture and soon will be exhibited in the Netherlands.

Made Griyawan ' The Unlucky Monkey"                         The Unlucky Monkey, 2016 – Made Griyawan

 

Each year a new sector of world art comes under the auctioneers spotlight at Christie’s and Sotheby’s. In 2017 it was African art – the market response was increased demand, and new record prices. It is inevitable that more international collectors will turn their attention to Balinese art  because of its quality and cheap prices. Could Balinese traditional art be one of the next booming markets?

Buying the right art requires some know how. Here are some tips for new collectors:

-Do your research and learn as much as possible through books and online information.

-Visit museums, galleries, auctions, artist’s studios, and exhibitions. Immerse yourself in art in order to train your eye.

-Get to know collectors and the experts. Seek out advice while learning about the industry.

-The best investment is with the emerging artists. Their works are cheaper and have a great potential for increasing in value and leading to future gains.

-Identify potential future masters by self-research and scouting, or align yourself with artist incubators.

-Invest early on masterpieces by the potential future masters.

-Think long term and hold for at least 10-15 years to wait for the market to mature for profit making.

-Works at auction often sell for prices much lower than that at galleries, or the artist’s studio.

-When buying at an auction set the price that you are not prepared to go above.

-There are still many Balinese works, often treasures, that remain forgotten, or unrecognized, which are stored away, and are yet to find their way onto the market.

-Young talent is thriving in the villages of Batuan, Keliki and Ubud and these important genres are in exciting new eras of development, driven by well-organized art collectives.

-Look out for the Larasati auction previews published online in the Jakarta Post.

bhineka-tunggal-ika-mungku-muriarti-mura                                     Painting by Mungku Muriarti Mura

 

Words & Images: Richard Horstman