Monthly Archives: May 2018

“Dipping in the Kool Aid” highlights collaborations between contemporary artists & inmates of Bali prisons

Rodney Glick "Pixel Buddha" image courtesy of apexart Gallery New York                                           Pixel Buddha – Rodney Glick

 

What is the value of human life?

How does our society appraise personal endeavour, imagination and creativity when the priority of doctors and medical staff in hospitals is the preservation of life? Governments and penal systems assess prisoners as having little to contribute to community, some electing to terminate the lives of ‘serious offenders’ through capital punishment. Why is it acceptable for governments to execute people, while murder is illegal?

The exhibition “Dipping in the Kool Aid” relates to aspects of prisons and the incarceration system, and opened at Tony Raka Art Gallery, Ubud 4 March. It features the artworks of prisoners, artworks produced from workshops given by contemporary artists in Bali prisons, and independently produced works by some of the invited established and emerging Indonesian and Australian artists.

malaikat copy                                       King Kong’s Land – Malaikat

The works selected from a range of workshops, predominantly in the Klungkung Jail, East Bali, and the Bangli Jail, include installations, paintings, drawings and photographs, along with a painting by a member of the controversial Bali Nine inmates, Renae Lawrence.

“A function of prisons practically everywhere in the world ensures inmates are social outsiders, largely invisible to most citizens,” said Australian artist Mary Lou Pavlovic who organized and curated the exhibition. “Our central concern is to bring aspects of prison life to public view.”

The idea of the exhibition emerged from an art program Pavlovic helped establish with inmates at the Bangli Jail, Central Bali soon after the second round of prisoner executions were ordered by the President of the Republic of Indonesia Joko Widodo in 2015. “Our aim is to cherish and preserve life, the driving motivator for this entire project.”

Mary Lou Pavlovic and prison inmates Mary Lou Pavlovic with input from April, Exyl, Hendra, and Kadek,collaborative installation "Suspended Sentiments" Image courtesy of "Dipping in theSuspended Sentiments – Mary Lou Pavlovic and women inmates from the Klungkung and Bangli jails.

In April 2017 Pavlovic’s proposal written in response to the open call Apex Franchise Exhibition, sponsored by the apexart Gallery New York, offering funded exhibition opportunities, won. More than two hundred international art expert jurors had voted for her proposal to curate an exhibition in Bali about artists and prisoners collaborations arising from prison workshops. A non-profit arts organization in Lower Manhattan, apexart is funded in part by the Andy Warhol Foundation, and offers opportunities to independent curators and emerging and established artists, and challenges ideas about art, its practice, and its curation.

Highlights of “Dipping in the Kool Aid”, in which the cell formation is a theme of the exhibition’s presentation to emphasize the living space – life behind bars within a prison cell, include, the tiny, delicate folded paper birds “Terapi Origami/Orizuru” by Ridwan Fatkhurodin a.k.a. Kriyip on display, yet also given as symbolic gifts to attendees during the opening ceremony, Kenyut Djunaidi’s collaborative etched mirror self-portraits “Kamu Adalah Aku, (You are Me)” and Australian Rodney Glick’s humorously militarized carved wooden icon “Pixel Buddha”. Elizabeth Gower’s “365 Rotations” adds an ethereal element to the show. Multiple circular collages Gower and inmates forged from discarded packaging and advertising material form a constellation of wonderful geometric patterns.

"Angki Purbandono "Out Of the Box" Image courtesy of apexart                                Out of the Box – Angki Purbandono

Popular Indonesian artist Angki Purbandono presents an installation of photographs “Out of the Box” revealing his experience of ‘doing time’. Incarcerated for one year in Yogyakarta during 2013 for smoking marijuana, refusing to accept his imprisonment, Angki declared instead that he was undertaking an artist’s residency, and taught a guard how to take photographs. He also established the Prison Art Programs, a group of inmates and ex-inmates who exhibit art inside and outside the jail; some members are included here.

Three meters by three and a half meters wide, luminescent and sparkling with life “Suspended Sentiments”, features over 1700 individual cells with flowers, leaves, nuts, berries, butterflies, bugs and Christmas decorations embedded within epoxy resin. Pavlovic’s wall installation, the outcome of workshops for women in Klungkung and Bangli Jails is beguiling in beauty and simplicity, yet rich in emotion.

31052365_10155177701881916_4372840048123445248_n                                   Forgiveness #2 – Mangu Putra

“Physical power is defeated by wisdom,” said renowned Balinese painter Agung Mangu Putra of his composition, “Forgiveness 2”. Inspired by an iconic image, originally popularized by Indonesia’s founding father, President Sukarno, who was photographed bowing to his mother, the state symbolically begs the pardon of not only a mother, but of a citizen, instead of the usual power dynamic in which citizens bow before the state. Mangu’s Putra’s painting reveals a state official – a soldier – bowing and begging forgiveness of his mother, who has taken away his gun.

“American jail slang for entering uninvited into a conversation, the phrase “Dipping in the Kool Aid” pays tribute to the discrete Javanese tradition of Pasemon,” Pavlovic said. Reflecting on Indonesia’s revolutionary era of political art that began under the authoritarian President Suharto’s New Order regime (1966-1998), artists and journalists used an indirect form of satire to criticize the government. Pasemon is elegant because it touches the conscience,” she continued. “Correcting without embarrassing authority.”

30706637_10155177599011916_7359454426228064256_n                Terapi Origami/Orizuru  –  Ridwan Fatkhurodin a.k.a. Kriyip

“Values expressed in this exhibition contrast with aspects of the government’s treatment of prisoners recently in Indonesia. Pasemon has created a space for us in which our political positions are clarified without scratching the wound.”

30741219_10155177702336916_1128266463887491072_n              365 Rotations  –  Elizabeth Gower with inmates from Bangli Jail

30703717_10155176985641916_986154805040775168_o               View of “Dipping in the Kool Aid” at the Tony Raka Art Gallery

 

30708338_10155177599166916_6226232579398303744_n        After Hit n Run  –  Herman Yosef Dhyas Aries Utomo (a.k.a. Komeng)

 

Dipping in the Kool Aid”

Open to the public daily 10am – 5pm,

4 – 31 March 2018

Tony Raka Art Gallery,

JI.Raya Mas No. 86 Mas, Ubud, Bali.

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images courtesy: apexart Gallery New York, Mary Lou Pavlovic & Bima Basudewa

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Fostering Positive Indonesia Australia Relations through Cultural Exchange

Sudibia_Alice Springs                                          Alice Springs – Made Sudibia

Vast and dramatic, yet empty, it’s colours and moods potent, and ever changing – the Top End is one of the world’s extraordinary natural environments. Visitors to the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia are overwhelmed by the space, power, and beauty of this remote and ancient terrain. Until recently, this pristine landscape remained unchartered territory by Indonesian artists.

The Artist’s Camp is a special, biannual initiative that began in 2012, with origins tracing back to the late 1970’s. It has been designed to introduce Indonesian artists to an array of NT landscapes and aboriginal cultures in order to engage and creatively respond to the indigenous environment and people. The 2015 Artist’s Camp has been the most ambitious project to date, with nine foreign artists, mostly Balinese, staying five weeks and traversing the NT 1500 Km’s south from Darwin to Alice Springs and Uluru (Ayers Rock), and crossing the waters north of Darwin to Melville Island.

A view of some of the artwork on display at the NCCA           A view of some of the works by Indonesian artists on display at NCCA

The artists visited and lived with diverse aboriginal communities where they learned about the local cultures, while also painting with the local artists. Touring in the region not only necessitates commitment and preparation, yet also in some instances, special permission from the authorities. Acquiring the deepest insights into the character and wisdom of this foreign environment only became possible along side the indigenous people.

The Balinese artists immediately established strong associations with the aboriginals whose culture is similar to their own, being deeply rooted in the environment and the spiritual world – with parallel universal cosmological views. Their sensitivity to distinctions of the physical and the non-physical worlds of the Top End translated into potent, intuitive artworks.

#2                     A view of work by Indonesian artists on display at the NCCA

The Artists’ Camp Retrospective 2012-2015 Exhibition presented impressions of the NT’s iconic terrains by some of Bali’s most exciting contemporary artists at the Northern Centre for Contemporary Art (NCCA) in Darwin, open from 19 January – 15 February 2018. Thirty-five works and over one hundred photographs revealed the vibrancy and soul of the Top End, while highlighting artistic engagement with the landscape, and the aboriginal culture.

Officiated by the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory, Michael Gunner and the Indonesian Acting Consul Mohhamed Hanifa, the exhibition opened in classical Indonesian style with three hits from an old Javanese gong. The exhibiting artists were I Made Budhiana, I Made Sudibia, Ni Nyoman Sani, I Wayan Wirawan, I Made ‘Dalbo’ Suarimbawa, I Gede Gunada Eka Atmaja, and I Dewa Gede Rata Yoga (Balinese), and East Javanese female painter Suryani, along with Aboriginal artist Lionel Possum and Australian artist Rupert Batheras. The Chief Minister of the NT, the Australia Indonesia Institute, the Indonesian Department of Foreign Affairs and the Commonwealth Bank Indonesia have sponsored the event.

#5                             Art by renowned Balinese artist Made Budhiana

“Being the first exhibition for the year we wanted to start with an exhibition involving Asian engagement and engagement with Indonesia, in particular,” said exhibition curator, long time collector of Indonesian and Aboriginal art and former Director and Chairman of the Board of Museums and Art Galleries in the Northern Territory (MAGNT), Colin McDonald.

“We wanted to highlight the artistic perceptions and aesthetic interpretations by leading Indonesian artists of the landscape of the Northern Territory and responses to living in Aboriginal communities and Aboriginal cultures.”

“I am so glad to learn that those participating artists in the Artists’ Camp have come together to showcase their collaborative works. I can simply say by looking at the paintings that you have worked so well and shown excellent pieces that represent the uniqueness of the Northern Territory,” said Mohhamed Hanifa during his exhibition opening speech.

Some of the photos of the Artist's Camp and Made Budhiana's other ventures to the NT at the NCCASome of the photos taken during the Artist’s Camp by Balinese artists Wayan Wirawan & Made Budhiana on display at the NCCA

“I would like to especially thank Colin McDonald who has been bridging and maintaining relationships, not only between the Bali Provincial Government and NT Government, but importantly between the Indonesian/Balinese artists and Australian/Territorian artists.”

Delving into new visual and conceptual territories the artists created vital interpretations of the landscape, from the barren wilderness, to mountain ranges and desert springs, along with responses to aboriginal traditions and livelihood. Some of the highlights were “Munupi & Pukumani Pipes” painted on Melville Island, Wayan Wirawan’s reaction to burial poles of the Tiwi Aboriginal community of Pirlangimpi, Made Budhiana’s “In the Darkness of the Night” is his nocturnal observations of the aboriginals and how at night the greater spirit of the people became evident, and Suryani’s pulsating “Beswick-Darwin” capturing the essence colorful native flora.

Indonesian Acting Consul Mohhamed Hanifa, the Chief Minister of the NT Michael Gunner and Colin McDonaldIndonesian Acting Consul Mohhamed Hanifa, the Chief Minister of the NT Michael Gunner and Colin McDonald during the opening at the NCCA.

The photographs, taken by Budhiana and Wirawan, revealed a compelling story of the artist’s time in the NT as guests, and as impromptu Indonesian cultural ambassadors. From their many light-hearted moments to random snaps taken on the road, while exploring, and art making, to images of their meetings with the public, officials at honorary functions, and the aboriginal people.

“What has stood out to me,” McDonald said, “Is the effortless way that the Indonesians interacted with the Aboriginal people, the positive synergy that evolved and the Indonesian’s immense appreciation for the indigenous traditions and art of the Top End.”

Made Budhiana_"In the Darkness of Night."                                  In the Darkness of Night – Made Budhiana

 

Sani Tiwi landscape                                       Twi Landscape – Nyoman Sani

Wayan Wirawan "Honeymoon Gap". Image M. O'Riordan                                 Honeymoon Gap – Wayan Wirawan

Balinese artists Wayan Wirawan, Made Budhiana, Ni Nyman Sani with Australian Artist Rupert Betheras at the NCCA 23 Jan 2016, Image Budhiana copyBalinese artists Wayan Wirawan, Made Budhiana and Nyoman Sani with Australian artist Rupert Berteras at the NCCA.

 

Words: Richard Horstman

Images: Made Budhiana, Richard Horstman, Colin McDonald & Maurice O’Riordan.